Yes another gyroball post

i have finally perfected the gyroball and unlike dice-K its not a fluke. and ive also converted it into another pitch. im a RHP and so i would turn my wrist into my body. but instead i grip it the same but i turn my wrist out the oppisite way. it moves the same as a gyroball just in the oppisite way and with way more break… would it still be a gyroball or would it be somthing else?

Could you post a video i’d like to see it.

thats called a screwball. A gyroball is supposed to move in on a lefty

here’s a video about it.

ohhh thx kaz, yea i guess thats just another way to throw my screwball, cause i thought so, its just a different way to grip it i suppose, thats why it had movment, so i just assumed i was throwing it. but when i throw it the other way like i said i guess thats the gyroball. ill post a video of me throwing the gyroball tomorrow if its not raining.

Sounds like a slider to me. That is if you’re throwing the gyro the way the Japanese pitchers do, and pronate hard on release so that the ball comes off the index finger and not the middle finger.

Hose

Sounds like a slider to me. That is if you’re throwing the gyro the way the Japanese pitchers do, and pronate hard on release so that the ball comes off the index finger and not the middle finger.

Hose[/quote]

haha well thats a good thing then because i guess i can finally throw a slider and ive always struggled with that and ive never been able to throw a slider.

god why does everyone post that long vid with no information of a gyro? ive thrown it a couple times and it works real well as a gyro and also as a 2seam .kinda like if you wanted to throw a cutter opposite ways heres a 15 sec link on a perfect view. its throw exactly like a fastball but with the fingers offset to the left. tired of this big mystery http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdr0N9HDptg

Sounds like a slider to me. That is if you’re throwing the gyro the way the Japanese pitchers do, and pronate hard on release so that the ball comes off the index finger and not the middle finger.

Hose[/quote]

When I throw my cutter I throw it off of my index finger. I think that I have natural pronation so it feels natural for me to throw my cutter off my index with pronation.

[quote=“Bower”]
When I throw my cutter I throw it off of my index finger. I think that I have natural pronation so it feels natural for me to throw my cutter off my index with pronation.[/quote]

From the videos I’ve seen, it (the gyro) takes a hard pronation right at release, and instead of staying “on top” of the ball, the wrist is angled so that the fingers are directly on the outside of the ball. On a cutter, your fingers stay more on top of the ball and the wrist snaps down with a pronated finish.

Hose

Jason,

Here’s the bottom line on your question but it bears thinking about carefully if you really want to understand it:

A gyroball, by definition of its inventors, has the spin axis perfectly aligned with the direction of flight of the ball.

The force that can cause spinning balls to have “extra” movement in the direction of their spin is called the Magnus force. The Magnus force is at its maximum value when the spin axis of a ball is exactly perpendicular to the direction of flight (for example, this principle applies equally to curves and FBs–the Magnus force is at its greatest for both of these pitches…but it works on these oppositely spinning pitches in opposite directions, with the obvious results).

However, the Magnus force on a ball is actually zero if the spin axis happens to exactly coincide with the direction of the ball’s flight. (That is why, for example, rapidly spinning bullets whose spin axis is directed toward their target do not veer off in the direction of their spin. Thus, it is also the fundamental reason for rifled barrels.)

So, the Magnus force on a perfectly thrown gyroball is zero and this pitch does not have any spin-induced movement up, down, or sideways.

Since the Magnus force is zero when the spin axis is collinear with direction of flight it also doesn’t matter whether you throw a gyroball with clockwise spin or counter-clockwise spin. (By analogy, it does not matter whether a gun manufacturer rifles his barrels to impart clockwise spin or counter-clockwise spin–the end result is the same: No Magnus force on the projectile = no spin-induced movement.)

Thrown by any given pitcher, a slider will move one way laterally and a screwball will move laterally in the opposite direction. This is because these two pitches not only have roughly opposite directions of spin but neither of their spin axes are collinear with the direction of flight (Magnus force is not zero) so their spin is able to induce movement. (Again, the induced movement is in the same direction of the spin for balls that experience a non-zero Magnus force).

Basically… A gyroball shouldnt break left or right

We’ve already gone through the Gyroball crap enough. It’s just a bullet type spin which causes it to go straight which is the purpose of a 4-seam fastball and therefore the gyroball is just another way to throw a fastball.

That shows what you know about the gyroball (nothing)

This is what a gyroball is supposed to do.

Why did matzusaka have to come along and start all this? lol

FutureKazmir: Bullet spin makes the projectile RESIST any deviation from its trajectory meaning straightness

yea its exactly what spencer said. if a bullet spun like that it would be hard to shoot something now wouldnt it? the hitter reads the spin and says, “this doesnt have fastball spin its gonna break.”. and it doesnt. fooling him and making them hopefully take the pitch right down the middle, expecting it to dive out of the zone.

are you people really serious? i know im not a master poster but wtf my short post +vid explains everything if you cant get that whats the deal? its a screwball it goes down and in to a right handed batter. ths held with a closed fastball grip and offcenter to the left…its faster than a screwball because theres still fastball pressure and throw like a fastball…a cutter is held offcenter right and a gyro offcenter left its pretty much a modified 2 seam…the vid shows the grip the throw and the movement,what more do you want?

Kaz, you think you know more than you do. You are not an expert on anything, stop acting like it.

Anybody actually read what the scientists that came up with the idea had to say?

[quote]

Figure 1. Forces on a spinning baseball in flight. The velocity vector v indicates the direction of motion and the angular velocity vector w indicates the direction of the spin. The spin axis points out of the plane of the figure.

Aerodynamics of the Gyroball
The gyroball is a unique pitch in that the spin axis is aligned with the direction of motion. According to our present understanding of aerodynamics, such a pitch should experience very little lift, as explained in Figs. 2-4 below. These figures were provided me by Dr. Ryutaro Himeno, the Japanese computer scientist who discovered the gyroball through elaborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. The captions are mine.

Figure 2: A “pure” gyroball in which the spin axis is exactly aligned with the initial direction of motion. The left figure shows a top view. The right figure is a side view from 3rd base. The pure gyroball has no horizontal break and no vertical “lift”. A typical fastball has backspin, which gives it an upward lift, opposing gravity. Therefore, the pure gyroball drops more than a typical fastball, as shown in the right figure. In fact, the principal action is similar to that of a split-finger fastball. Actually this pitch has a very small amount of break away from a right-handed batter because the direction of motion of the ball develops a small downward component due to gravity.

Figure 3: A gyroball in which the spin axis is slightly tilted horizontally to the right (i.e., toward 3rd base) relative to the direction of motion. The left figure shows a top view. The top right figure shows a side view from 1st base and the bottom right figures shows a side view from third base. The horizontal tilting of the spin axis gives the ball a little backspin which gives the ball lift. Therefore the ball drops a little less than a pure gyroball but still significantly more than a fastball. As with the pure gyroball, there is no horizontal break. Himeno call this pitch the “gyroball with lift force.”

Figure 4: A gyroball in which the spin axis is slightly tilted upward. The left figure shows a side view from 1st base. The top right and bottom right figures show a top view. Such a pitch will have a slight sidespin, causing it to break to the left, away from a right-handed batter, similar to a cut fastball. As with the pure gyroball in Figure 2, the ball drops more than a typical fastball with backspin. If instead the spin axis were tilted slightly downward, the ball would break in the opposite direction, toward a right-handed hitter. Himeno call his pitch the “gyroball with side force.”

Conclusions:
The foregoing analysis suggests that there is very little sideways break of a gyroball, a conclusion that is at odds with many of the claims I have seen on the web. The primary motion of the pitch is that it drops much more than a typical fastball. [/quote]

This is coming from scientists here in the United States that are involved with baseball. It appears to me it is a fastball that sinks, just another way to throw a sinker. I learned something new in here and hopefully you all do too.