Wrist Bend?


#1

My 9 yo is a very flexible little pitcher. When in his power position and the ball pointing at the shortstop, his wrist is bent (extension) 90 degrees to the forearm. He fields/throws this way as well. He is very accurate but a velocity reducer? A problem?


#2

Should be fine, its a hitch some people throw with to add sling the to ball, but not really a pitch move. It might be a way to coordinate shoulder power to the hand because the hand is not going down and back enough. It should be fine and will go away as he gets older. Its actually a good thing for a youngster because he is understanding how to " sling " the ball.


#3

Pitchers with this kind of wrist action are common in the game. In fact, every pitcher that I’ve coached or witnessed using this wrist action as a natural part of their overall movement and the way their body readies itself. I wouldn’t be all that conserned at this point - however, this kind of form is not subject to change, at all.

One of the most frustrating things that a player and coach can experience is trying to adjust or change this style - so don’t. If your youngster is comfortable and handles himself well, he’s doing fine. Now, he won’t be hitting the high numbers velocity wise, but then that can change as he gets older.

Pitchers in the set with runners on first can be subject to giving up second because of the extra time it takes many pitchers to ready themselves, prior to completing their pitching motion. Now, not all pitchers are subject to this but enough of the population to warrant a close look-see at your youngster and his ability to hold runners “checked”.

Also, the breaking pitch can be an on-gain-off-again thing in latter innings of work. The reasons for this complexion are many and vary with the size and physique of the individual.

Infielders that use this kind of wrist action can be subject to throws that can go high and wild, if rushed. If your youngster plays short or third, and his throws to first are rushed, look for high throws. This means that his timing is being rushed and beyond his body’s ability to properly set himself up, using this wrist action. So, the down side to this kind of wrist action for a fielder is the extra second or two it takes to properly maintain control of their throws on close plays.

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#4

I am glad you posted the pictures-my son has his wrist flipped the opposite direction of the pitchers in those pictures. He does it more often with his fielding now than with pitching.


#5

When you say your son’s “wrist flipped in the opposite direction”, do you mean that his fingers are pointing up?

I’m not sure of the hand/wrist configuration that you’re describing, but if you could post a picture, it would help.

On the other hand if what’s here is good enough and satisfies what you’re looking for, then I guess this can stand as-is.


#6

My 12 year old bends his wrist big time. Been working on how to fix it, and he just can’t grasp it to do it right. Been working on it for 2 years now to fix it. Any suggestions?

At least I think that’s the thing that makes his throwing motion look so unconventional.

Love some feedback!


#7

The answer is the same today

nccy,

“ When in his power position and the ball pointing at the shortstop, his wrist is bent (extension) 90 degrees to the forearm.

This is where it ultimately ends up, no matter how you start your shortening sequence.
In order to flex the wrist powerfully during the shortening phase, you must attain extension in the wrist during the lengthening phase. If you take it back nominally positioned, the forwards force of the pitch bends the back involuntarily any ways, just not with as much acceleration starting length.

He fields/throws this way as well.”

It takes time usually to get kids to do this, it’s one of the velocity adders and the crack at the end of the whip.

“He is very accurate but a velocity reducer?

No, this is a velocity adder

“A problem?”

Only with kids who are static with the their arrival and less than nominally extended.

Tydowns

Been working on how to fix it

Fix what? This is pretty much what occurs intuitively on all 3 fast balls types whether forearm pronated or supinated.

“he just can’t grasp it to do it right.”

Good for him, he’s a feeler. What is right according to what you have learned?

“ Been working on it for 2 years now to fix it. Any suggestions?”

Ya, let it go and teach him on off speed each pitch has a different hand orientation depending on lateral movement intent. All fast balls should be launched from full extension.

“At least I think that’s the thing that makes his throwing motion look so unconventional.
Love some feedback!”

You need to teach him how to follow his throws with 175 degrees of body rotation, so that his arm will recover back in line with his shoulders so that his recovery is not eccentrically (lengthening while contracting) pathomechanical. This will give him more rotational acceleration length right when they need it.