Would graciously accept any criticism (constructive) please!

Hey everyone, this site has been an invaluable tool for me. I was hoping for some help/tips/drills for my mechanics. Here’s a quick background:

I’m 30 years old. I’m prior military and in the upper ranks of physical fitness and conditioning. This is my second season pitching for an adult wooden bat league. My fastball sits at an average of 68 an occasionally hits 73-74. My goal was to be sitting at 81-82 by this season. I feel like I have a ton left in me, but I’m struggling to throw harder.

I am incessant about practicing drills and conditioning. If anyone has any specific drills relating to improving my mechanics, that would be fantastic. Thanks so much for the help and guidance!

Normal speed videos in addition are helpful, and your video’s angle doesn’t highlight all the angles in your delivery. Side and rear views are best.

I think I see only a couple things: There’s very little shoulder and hip separation, so your torso isn’t doing much work. And your release looks like it occurs just barely past your shoulder when it should be way more in front. Extention and pronounced follow-through can lead to a more forward release.

I heard that the “towel drill” is good for exaggerating a more forward release and follow through, I may try and incorporate reps of that in my work out.

…as for hip/shoulder separation. I know it’s a vital piece of transferring power. Is there a drill that will focus on that motion or a way to learn separation? I am 99% sure that my flexibility is not the problem.

I noticed that I have zero back toe drag as well. My foot seems to come off the mound right after ball release, unlike other pitchers I see who have a long toe drag. Am I not turning my rear foot over or something?

you clearly aren’t pushing off the mound AT ALL, you can tell because your foot is off the ground before you’ve even released the ball
try using all the force in your pivot leg to push off the mound without throwing, once you’ve done that for a while start throwing the ball with that same full force push off the mound

You also seem to have a lot of swing with your leg. I would bring it straight up and strait towards the plate.

Two things:

(1) You need to get the hips moving forward sooner to create some momentum.

(2) Get the arms into an “equal and opposite” position (equal bends at teh elbows) and maintain that until as close to front foot plant as possible. This will keep the shoulders closed longer allowing the hips to rotate furter before the shoulders rotate. That’s more hip and shoulder separation and, hopefully, more velocity.

-Roger

In regards to getting the front hip moving sooner, is that just timing your push off the mound and starting the hips towards home?

Is this [the following link] equal and opposite separation position?

-Fran

Is the movement towards home a push off like ice skating or a long “reach” with your front foot? I guess I’m asking…would you suggest picking a spot ahead of me and trying to toe that or just push off as hard as I can I guess like a speed skater starting?

-Dave

Watching myself I see that I have a huge rocker step and a lot of leg movement. I see most professionals with very minimal movement. I am going to correct that and make everything more compact.

-Beard

I am going to try incorporating the towel drill in my pitching workouts to get me in the habit of a pronounced follow-through and see what that does for my release point. I do feel that I’m not out front when I throw.

yup just like a skater yoou want to push off it as hard as you can, it creates momentum and in turn velocity

the reason your back toe doesnt drag is because you arent pushing off like pro pitchers do

I didn’t even look there. The push off can give you +5 MPH easily, maybe more.

[quote=“PenmanVA”]-Roger

In regards to getting the front hip moving sooner, is that just timing your push off the mound and starting the hips towards home?[/quote]
Yes. But I prefer pitchers focus on moving this hips forward instead of pushing off as it helps you lead with the front hip better.

[quote]Is this [the following link] equal and opposite separation position?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmtip21/5528336500/[/quote]
Can’t really see how much the front arm is bent but it looks pretty “equal and opposite”.

1.you need to stand properly as you followthrough,

your upper body should face the catcher, instead the left hand side of the mound when you followthrough,

this is what your finish motion is, and i suggest you that should not have this kind of finish position

below is an example of what i mean your upper should face the catcher

if your upper body do not want to face the catcher,
at leat you should have a stable balance as you followthrough like this

thats why Tim lincecum sometimes, still off balance and has bad followthrough phase motion because his upper body is towards left hand side of the mound instead of the catcher

  1. you need to stride longer to reach, at least 95 % of your height

look at the stride angle between 2 legs and stride distance

this is what you should take into consideration in order to reach 95-100 % stride distance of your height

last thing to notice is that at 0.17-0.18

look closely , your front foot actually moves, instead stand properly~~~

recommandations: to improve your stride distance and stride angle between 2 legs, you should do some drill to strengthen of your front legs (left legs)

and you should extend your front foot, after leg kick, in order to have a good stride angle and stride distance

im sorry i can not see your arm swing action,

[quote=“hydejing”]1.you need to stand properly as you followthrough,

your upper body should face the catcher, instead the left hand side of the mound when you followthrough,

this is what your finish motion is, and i suggest you that should not have this kind of finish position

below is an example of what i mean your upper should face the catcher

if your upper body do not want to face the catcher,
at leat you should have a stable balance as you followthrough like this

thats why Tim lincecum sometimes, still off balance and has bad followthrough phase motion because his upper body is towards left hand side of the mound instead of the catcher

  1. you need to stride longer to reach, at least 95 % of your height

look at the stride angle between 2 legs and stride distance

this is what you should take into consideration in order to reach 95-100 % stride distance of your height

last thing to notice is that at 0.17-0.18

look closely , your front foot actually moves, instead stand properly~~~

recommandations: to improve your stride distance and stride angle between 2 legs, you should do some drill to strengthen of your front legs (left legs)

and you should extend your front foot, after leg kick, in order to have a good stride angle and stride distance[/quote]

Do you have any reasoning for any of your advice? Your mechanical advice has no answer to the question why? Why should we follow through to home plate in good landing position. Dan Haren doesn’t do it and is quite successful. Why should he stride longer? Can you even tell how long his stride is from his video.

You need evidence for your arguments if you ever want anybody to take you seriously.

yes you are right, i do not have any arguement for striding long ( 95-100 % of your height)

if anyone here got evidence to argue, please feel free to add

if you can command very well like Dan Haren, and still off balance,
then please ignore my comment

why upper body should face the catcher and stay well balance is because, i believe that if you have a better balance, you can command or control the pitch better than off balance

maybe someone can do the survey or research about why they should face the catcher and stay well balance

or

why they should off their balance and consider that is a good example of followthrough motion

A longer stride requires a harder push which usually generates more power (or pitch speed). I’d say that facing the catcher allows for more controlled, repeatable pitches. Which is desired, isn’t it?

Thanks for all the input. We’re finishing up our summer league. I threw about 50 innings in 16 games. At the beginning of the season, basically my very first bullpen session, I was clocked around 70 mph with my two-seamer. I worked a lot on my stride length and leading with my front hip. Last week I had a bullpen session and with the adjustments I made throughout the season I am now throwing 78-80 mph consistently. It’s amazing how much easier it seems to be to throw hard when you utilize your lower body more efficiently. I plan on working hard on my hip/shoulder separation this off season and continuing my lower body work. I am hoping to sit in the low to mid 80s by next season

Many moons ago, I learned something that I call “The Secret”, and I pass it on to you for what it’s worth. It is this: you need to get your entire body into the action.
I used to go to the original Yankee Stadium every chance I got, and I would watch the pitchers. I noticed that the team’s Big Three rotation—Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi and Ed Lopat—were all doing the same thing; they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, so that there was an uninterrupted flow of energy all the way to the shoulder and the arm. Not only were they getting more power behind their pitches, they were also taking a lot of pressure off said arm and shoulder, so they could throw harder and faster with less effort (even Lopat, who was by no means a fireballer). Seeing this, I realized that what they were doing was the real key to a pitcher’s power, and I made a note of it and started working on it on my own. And as I worked on this I discovered that I was doing the same thing they were—throwing harder (if not faster) with less effort. That’s right, I didn’t have a fast ball to speak of—but I did get more power into my pitches.
A good place to start is with something called the “Hershiser drill”, which aims at getting the hips fully involved in the process. And you don’t need any special equipment, just a fence or a wall. Fact is, the hips are the connection between the lower and upper halves of the body, and once this connection is established everything else will fall into place. You can find details on this drill and how to do it on this website. 8)

Just an update…thank you for all the advice! I took into account all your suggestions and drilled insanely hard this off season. I designed some of my own drills focusing on the areas that were in serious need of tweaking. These were the main focuses of those drills:

[i][b]1. I cut out the wind up and am throwing purely from the stretch now.

  1. I concentrated on lengthening my stride (I am striding out to nearly 73" consistently) while maintaining a sideways trajectory. No more horrible leg swing or turning my whole body away.

  2. I have really focused on stage separation i.e. turning over my back foot, then firing my hips, and then turning my shoulders. Now (unlike my previous video) my back foot is still in contact and fully turned over upon ball release.

  3. I am forcefully flexing my trunk forward and “picking up the dollar bill from the ground” when following through.[/b][/i]

Concentrating mainly on these four changes, I made huge improvements coming into this year. Last year I was maxing out at around 74 mph on a Bushnell gun (which I have a feeling is a little slow) and was experiencing some unnatural elbow soreness. I was gunned during practice this year and to my surprise, I was sitting around 79-80 and maxed out around 82-83. I would really like to see what I am throwing on a legitimate gun like a Stalker or Jugs.

I’ll post some video of my next live or bullpen session. Again, I thank you all for the suggestions and help! Maybe 90mph will be in my future.

I would imagine that you didn’t just use this site for advice and certainly it didn’t put all the hard work in to get you to where you are at…so…congratulations to you, seeking out advice, for opening your head to ideas and for putting in the time and effort. It doesn’t end there, this is just the start…

Thanks buwhite, I put in a lot of hard work drilling to correct my faults. I’m still off from where I want to be, but I am continually improving. I think the greatest thing I have learned from this site, other sites, and pitching in general is that improvement is constant and change is necessary. No one is ever perfect and there is always room for improvement.

I hope to get some new video to post soon of my improve delivery and mechanics.