Would a college consider a knuckleball pitcher?

Okay as many of you know my main pitch is a knuckleball, my fastball sits in the 70s somewhere I would guess. My knuckleball has been getting outs when I’ve pitched and I utilize my other pitches from time to time to get outs so it’s not like I don’t know how to pitch, I just have a unique style.

My catcher’s tell me that my knuck moves a lot, a softer one will usually get a lot of small flutters and a big drop, the harder thrown ones have less flutters but they’re bigger and a little bit less drop but still a lot.

If anyone has any information on colleges that might consider having a knuckleballer pitch for them please let me know.

You have any video of this knuckle?

I don’t, I got video of it once and it was a mini disc which I can’t use in a mac.

Most college coaches will want their guys to be above 80. I would give it a shot though, never know what might happen.

Well I have one more year left to play before I play for a college and I think that this off-season I’ll be working out a lot and throwing and try to get an 80+ fastball.

Expectations wouldn’t be much different, you’d have to dominate like anybody else trying to pitch in college.

Work on your fastball, great knucklers are designed when its the last resort to stay in the game. (See Tim wakefield.

Well that’s not always the case, Haeger came up through the minors with it and Fernandez over in Japan has been throwing it his whole life. The Niekroa already had it before becoming renowned for it. Wilhelm had always thrown it. Sean Flaherty and Andrew Connor both pitched in college with the knuck at University of Miami and Savannah State University.

I’ve been throwing it for a long time and that’s mostly what my coach has me throw. I’m a first baseman for the most part but I do pitch as well like many people at lower level baseball I’m not just a pitcher. I’ll be honest if I go anywhere it’ll probably be as a 1st baseman because I can hit and I can field.

I do work on my fastball, a knuckleballer has to because the fastball mechanics are the foundation of any pitch how else do you think it’s possible to throw a ball 55 to 70 mph with a grip such as that of a knuckleball when the average human being can only throw a ball around 40-50 mph?

I guess I kind of answered my own question by mentioning Flaherty and Connor because they did pitch in college with it. I actually used to talk to Andrew Connor a lot but I haven’t talked to him in a long time since he wrecked his elbow and had to stop playing baseball.

But still, only 2 of those guys were super-productive(wilhelm and Niekro). I guess you can say Wake’s done good, but still the colleges want Tim Lincecums and Jon Lesters, not Tim Wakefield. (I am a huge fan of all 3).But still, give it all you got. My goal is to make it to the majors. But if I dont make it and I give it my best shot, I’ll be happy.

Never said a college WANTS a knuckleballer I asked whether or not they would CONSIDER a knuckleballer.

The point is the knuckleball is my strength as a pitcher and I needed to know if it was possible to go anywhere with it

By the way Dickey, Haeger and all those other guys who had the knuck they’re whole life I’d say making the MLB is more success than I needed for that example as I’m reffering to college, in which case Flaherty and Connor are good examples because they got into division one schools with it.

[quote=“Pustulio”]Well that’s not always the case, Haeger came up through the minors with it and Fernandez over in Japan has been throwing it his whole life. The Niekroa already had it before becoming renowned for it. Wilhelm had always thrown it. Sean Flaherty and Andrew Connor both pitched in college with the knuck at University of Miami and Savannah State University.

I’ve been throwing it for a long time and that’s mostly what my coach has me throw. I’m a first baseman for the most part but I do pitch as well like many people at lower level baseball I’m not just a pitcher. I’ll be honest if I go anywhere it’ll probably be as a 1st baseman because I can hit and I can field.

I do work on my fastball, a knuckleballer has to because the fastball mechanics are the foundation of any pitch how else do you think it’s possible to throw a ball 55 to 70 mph with a grip such as that of a knuckleball when the average human being can only throw a ball around 40-50 mph?

I guess I kind of answered my own question by mentioning Flaherty and Connor because they did pitch in college with it. I actually used to talk to Andrew Connor a lot but I haven’t talked to him in a long time since he wrecked his elbow and had to stop playing baseball.[/quote]

Haeger was drafted out of high school based on a hard fastball, he didn’t have a knuckleball yet. He developed it after arm trouble and not being able to get anybody out.

If you can dominate with a knuckler, then I’m thinking a college would consider you. Colleges like good pitchers, and if you prove that you are a good pitcher who can get college hitters out with a knuckler, then I’m sure someone will give you a shot.

The issue here might be: how good is the knuckler, and how can you tell how good it is? You have to resign to the fact that you’re a “trick” pitcher so you’ll have to be successful at all times. A guy with a 90 mph fastball who struggles gets a second chance. A trick pitcher who struggles does not.

So would a college consider it? Sure, why not? But it better be a heckuva pitch. There’s a reason why we can only name a handful of successful knuckleballers in recent history.

Thanks for all the posts guys.

To the above, I understand what you’re saying but I’m little touchy with the word trick pitcher. See it’s not a trick, they’ll know it’s coming and I’m not afraid to let the batter know that. The fact is basic pitching principles still apply such as changing speeds and elevation on the pitch. I get what you’re saying but think about it a conventional pitcher is more of a trick pitcher than anyone because he’s throwing pitches to fool the batter to get outs by throwing a variety of pitches.

I do understand what you mean though a knuckleballer will get less of a chance than a flamethrower.

Ya know, I wouldn’t be one to give advice to you, pustulio, because we are 2 different types of ballplayers, we are both good, but we are both different. I throw 69mph already, and you have a hell of a knuckler. I suck at 1st base, you have a good glove(I either pitch, catch or CF). Also, you are older than me in that you are looking for a college. My point is though, more people are successful if they are a Lincecum or Pujols rather than a Wakefield or Kendall. But again, just give it all you got, because you never know what will happen.

I’d say Wakefield and Jason Kendal have been pretty dang successful, considering they have both had long careers in the majors.

Yes, but Lincecum and Pujols are future hall of famers. Kendall ruined my Pirates by being the million dollar slap hitter. Wake is awesome, but he isnt a HOFer.

I wouldn’t be too sure about Pujols and Lincecum yet they’re great now but let’s see how long the domination lasts. Wakefield well I think he needs a few more wins and to get over 200 wins before he gets in and if he does he won’t be a first ballot guy but he’s a great knuckleball pitcher, has the most wins in Boston Red Sox history.

See Wake is awesome. And he is a great guy.

I actually think a knuckleballer is a good thing for a college team, because it mixes speeds. Most of the players do not see one, therefore they can have great success. The only problem is that when you do not have velocity in a fastball the hitters can wait out the knuckleballs and work the count for the slow fastballs. Now I know you think you wouldn’t have a problem with the strike zone, but typically the rule is that a knuckleballer that has great stuff has a tendency to throw a lot of balls, and college hitters are more disciplined to work the counts. When that happens you need something to keep them honest. if you can get your fastball in the 80’s you have a better chance to make a team, and my advice would be to show your mechanics and see if one of us can find something in your motion that would help your velocity.

As of 12-08-12, Edward Ruggers is throwing the knuckleball at Galveston Jr. College and is in his second year. He has thrown it since he was 12 years old in competition. He has a short youtube video.