working out

if you use a arm band and go through your pitching motion can that increase your velocity .

Probably not, because most of a pitcher’s power is generated in the torso, but it will help to condition your shoulder and may make you less vulnerable to injury.

dtrain, I want to elaborate on what Chris has said here because it is resaid time and again on this site. The bands are there to help your shoulder conditioning, you have decellorator muscles on the back side of your shoulder, they should be conditioned in the same way you condition other parts of your body.
The very best ways in which a pitcher (In my experience) can increase his velocity is to approach what he does in a planned manner in which every aspect of pitching is considered. There is no shortcut that is healthy.
In my opinion you should do a few things and avoid a few others.

1st, condition your entire body, don’t lift for “beach muscles”, lift in a way in which your entire body is strong, yet limber (Remember these are only my recommendations and many folks have written many books on the subject). Running is great because it’ll not only condition your legs but increase your stamina.
2nd, throw the ball, there is worlds of drill work out there (Find out which ones help you in controlling your mechanics and use them…you’ll find a whole lot of arguement out there about stuff like weighted balls and towel drills…I like the simple ones that allow for better control of mechanics…step behinds and having your catcher sit at 50’ instead of 60’6" which helps you get and keep the ball low) but nothing quite beats just getting out there and on flat ground (Which has less arm/body impact) toss the ball. The Japanese throw crazy amounts of warm up (8 hours or more).
3rd, have someone that knows, look at your mechanics, it could be your hs coach, or a certified instructor, but getting your mechanics as smooth as possible is one of the quickest/safest ways I know to get your velocity up (An adage I have heard from D-1 coaches is the harder you fight yourself the slower you throw, no matter how strong you are).
4th, practice and visualize your motion. Easy work but can help you much, pitching is a very mental art and the more in control and confident you are the better you will pitch.
You’ll notice I’ve spent no time talking about “getting faster”, the reason is, and one of the reasons many hate the radar gun is when you concentrate on throwing harder you lose control of your mechanics and are wandering down a road that could lead to injury. My son has been clocked anywhere from 82 to 90, I really just hate that because the times I’ve seen him throw his best and hardest, he was worried only about delivering the ball in a mechanically sound fashion. He was very disappointed at his last time getting gunned at a local university because he only hit 86, frankly this passed me off because he hit his spots really well and had all of his pitches going exactly where he wanted them…To me that is the point (He wanted to “show” his HS coach that he could pop 90…That is crap!!! do not think that way! He has since changed his opinion).
The things to avoid are gimmicky things like using one directed thing, whether weighted balls or bands, or med balls as a shortcut to speed. Speed comes when you pull it altogether in a nice neat heap.
Get a plan dtrain, work towards the goal, this is how you learn in life. Heck even if you ultimately don’t make it as a pitcher you’ll have learned one of the biggest secrets to success, which is to set a goal and work towards it. If things aren’t working in one way, well adjust, but keep moving in the direction of the goal.
Good Luck
jd

I like lots of old fashioned throwing because it automatically works all of the muscles involved in the throw.

The problem with too much weight lifting, and not enough old fashioned throwing, is that you can end up with muscle imbalances, which means that you upsize your engine without also upsizing your brakes.

It’s much harder to get a muscle imbalance if your development program is based on old fashioned throwing.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”][quote=“jdfromfla”]1st, condition your entire body, don’t lift for “beach muscles”…2nd, throw the ball, there is worlds of drill work out there (Find out which ones help you in controlling your mechanics and use them…you’ll find a whole lot of arguement out there about stuff like weighted balls and towel drills…I like the simple ones that allow for better control of mechanics…step behinds and having your catcher sit at 50’ instead of 60’6" which helps you get and keep the ball low) but nothing quite beats just getting out there and on flat ground (Which has less arm/body impact) toss the ball. The Japanese throw crazy amounts of warm up (8 hours or more).[/quote] Cant wait to see the pitchers of the major league team thats courting you out there at 6am for an afternoon game “warming up”. Man you are truly truly out there!!! There is such a thing as time invested/reward or return Chris.

I like lots of old fashioned throwing because it automatically works all of the muscles involved in the throw. You have said in the past that weighted baseball are NOT heavy enough to provoke a response in regards to strength if that is true than how in the hell is throwing a regular baseball gonna get anybody stronger?? To put your misconception to rest I would ask you, "if that is the case than why on Gods green earth can a pitcher NOT throw a 7ounce ball as hard as he can a 5 ounce ball??? Or how is it that a pitcher can throw a 4 ounce ball harder than a 5 ounce ball?? Can you pass along some information on how to perform some “good old fashioned throwing” as opposed to to some “new old fashion throwing”. Do you read what you write dude??? This should be priceless!!

The problem with too much weight lifting, and not enough old fashioned throwing, is that you can end up with muscle imbalances, which means that you upsize your engine without also upsizing your brakes. WRONG again guru ending up with ANY imbalance is associated with lifting the wrong way and/or not lifting for balance, has NOTHING to do with throwing!

It’s much harder to get a muscle imbalance if your development program is based on old fashioned throwing. Of course your not building/adding any real muscle by throwing a baseball. You may be conditioning throwing muscles involved but if you honestly believe your adding any form of starting strength or actually becoming stronger as a whole… well… you probabaly do so Ill just let that end right there. YOu know about as much in regards to training as you do about throwing a ball so I guess I will have to give you a pass there too. Under the guise of a person who does not know and they do not know they do not know! Thats WHY you are a danger!!!in my opinion of course!

In order not to confuse dtrain, chin do you feel the same about what I recommended to dtrain?

[quote=“jdfromfla”]Speed comes when you pull it altogether in a nice neat heap.[/quote]Nice!!

[quote=“dtrain”]if you use a arm band and go through your pitching motion can that increase your velocity .[/quote]i know a lot of colleges that use this technique to increase velocity.

Yes I do! Putting together the whole heap is the end result of what was done prior. I have always said it all comes down to “preparation” preparation enhances potential. I train pitchers for strength. Than I train pitchers for stength and velocity. The throwing aspect is adifferent entity altogether but as you said perfectly, that part of the whole heap that gets blended together. I separate the velocity training and the “bullpen” type training. THe bullpen stuff comes after everything else. Not in the same session but moreso in a different training cycle. They also throw weighted balls but those are also done under the guise of training not pitching. Again I separate the velocity specific training from the pitching specific training. Once it is all blended together the training is more of a maintainence type program. Thats when the pitching specifics are put into place.

Tanner, real velocity increases happen when you “bring more to the table to begin with” this is in direct regards to STRENGTH. Strength comes in many forms. In this discussion the best form of strength trained would be for starting strength or absolute strength. Simply put the amount you bring to the table to begin with. Mechanics will only so some much. Once your mechanics are good by whoevers standards all the work in the world will not increase velocity. At some point “strength will become an issue” regardless of how good ones mechanics become. In other words a 4 cyclinder motor is only going to put out some much power REAGRDLESS of how well its tuned up. At some point that car is going to hit the wall due to the fact that it has reached its max level output. New tires or anything else will NOT help it after it reaches its max level of output. At that point one can only work to keep it running at its max level. It takes a bigger engine to produce change as in more power. In my opinion this is why so many high schoolers smack the perverbial wall after they hit the low to mid 80’s. There engine has reaches its peak level of operation. They dont realize that no matter how well they keep it tuned up its not going to produce faster speeds or higher velocities due to a strength /power deficit. Im not saying the bands are bad either they are infact very very good, after saying that they are only good for what they are designed to be doing. Building real strength is not their primary purpose.

“In other words a 4 cyclinder motor is only going to put out some much power REAGRDLESS of how well its tuned up.”

I’ll put in Tanner that my son has been told by every coach and scout that has looked at him that he has to get stronger. As a matter of fact all that I hear in regards to hitting is the same at his point (He’s a jr and as I said he has broke 90).
He strained his back in late Aug. and he had to lay off of the conditioning for a couple of months, this is why IMO he didn’t sit at 91 or 2 in Dec. It really opened his eyes as to the work he had to continue to do (Ain’t no cheating at this level…either you work on it or be satisfied with what you have). This is why I tried to lay out so much to dtrain…he’s all over the boards looking at every which way to get “faster”, but there isn’t a “gimmick” out there that will substitute for good hard work and a comprehensive “OVER-All” plan in which you set forth and stick to. Figure if there was a shortcut the guy who invented it would be one rich sucker…but as you know and are learning, once you start talking college and above the amount of guys doing it gets less and less, as you know that is because to work at that level is difficult and it gets harder. My sons hitting and pitching coach is Rick Wilkins, he was in the bigs for around 10 years, he has told me many times that his general workout (Non baseball specific) was at least 6 hours per day, just to stay in major league shape. It ticks me off to see folks that want to sell a kid some thinggie and claim it’s gonna get the kid “better”. The word is panacea…there isn’t any that will do it.
Dtrain, get enough cash to buy Steven’s “Tuff Cuff”, it is a comprehensive workout/throwing/conditioning book that IS baseball/pitching specific…A very high quality aid in which you can be assured that if you follow it and work your tail off you will improve (As Chin said) what you bring to the table.

Good Luck fellas!

“In other words a 4 cyclinder motor is only going to put out some much power REAGRDLESS of how well its tuned up.”

I’ll put in Tanner that my son has been told by every coach and scout that has looked at him that he has to get stronger. As a matter of fact all that I hear in regards to hitting is the same at his point (He’s a jr and as I said he has broke 90).
He strained his back in late Aug. and he had to lay off of the conditioning for a couple of months, this is why IMO he didn’t sit at 91 or 2 in Dec. It really opened his eyes as to the work he had to continue to do (Ain’t no cheating at this level…either you work on it or be satisfied with what you have). This is why I tried to lay out so much to dtrain…he’s all over the boards looking at every which way to get “faster”, but there isn’t a “gimmick” out there that will substitute for good hard work and a comprehensive “OVER-All” plan in which you set forth and stick to. Figure if there was a shortcut the guy who invented it would be one rich sucker…but as you know and are learning, once you start talking college and above the amount of guys doing it gets less and less, as you know that is because to work at that level is difficult and it gets harder. My sons hitting and pitching coach is Rick Wilkins, he was in the bigs for around 10 years, he has told me many times that his general workout (Non baseball specific) was at least 6 hours per day, just to stay in major league shape. It ticks me off to see folks that want to sell a kid some thinggie and claim it’s gonna get the kid “better”. The word is panacea…there isn’t any that will do it.
Dtrain, get enough cash to buy Steven’s “Tuff Cuff”, it is a comprehensive workout/throwing/conditioning book that IS baseball/pitching specific…A very high quality aid in which you can be assured that if you follow it and work your tail off you will improve (As Chin said) what you bring to the table.

Good Luck fellas!

“In other words a 4 cyclinder motor is only going to put out some much power REAGRDLESS of how well its tuned up.”

I’ll put in Tanner that my son has been told by every coach and scout that has looked at him that he has to get stronger. As a matter of fact all that I hear in regards to hitting is the same at his point (He’s a jr and as I said he has broke 90).
He strained his back in late Aug. and he had to lay off of the conditioning for a couple of months, this is why IMO he didn’t sit at 91 or 2 in Dec. It really opened his eyes as to the work he had to continue to do (Ain’t no cheating at this level…either you work on it or be satisfied with what you have). This is why I tried to lay out so much to dtrain…he’s all over the boards looking at every which way to get “faster”, but there isn’t a “gimmick” out there that will substitute for good hard work and a comprehensive “OVER-All” plan in which you set forth and stick to. Figure if there was a shortcut the guy who invented it would be one rich sucker…but as you know and are learning, once you start talking college and above the amount of guys doing it gets less and less, as you know that is because to work at that level is difficult and it gets harder. My sons hitting and pitching coach is Rick Wilkins, he was in the bigs for around 10 years, he has told me many times that his general workout (Non baseball specific) was at least 6 hours per day, just to stay in major league shape. It ticks me off to see folks that want to sell a kid some thinggie and claim it’s gonna get the kid “better”. The word is panacea…there isn’t any that will do it.
Dtrain, get enough cash to buy Steven’s “Tuff Cuff”, it is a comprehensive workout/throwing/conditioning book that IS baseball/pitching specific…A very high quality aid in which you can be assured that if you follow it and work your tail off you will improve (As Chin said) what you bring to the table.

Good Luck fellas!