Work so far


#1

Here are a couple of pictures of me pitching trying to work on shoulder / hip seperation. All feed back is greatly appreciate!!

I have posted the video at the bottom

In this one my hips looked closed and my back foot has not turned over, which believe me is very hard to do.

In this one I tried very hard to get that back foot to be laces down when at foot plant. This is probably the best I have ever done this.

Here’s the video of the whole thing

Explore Jose Santiago

#2

do you feel like your following through? your back leg isint swinging forward like it should, it just kind of stays back at the rubber area, probably causing a loss of separation and momentum, you might be opening your hips up to quickly, it should be at the last second, yours seems a little early


#3

What format is the video in? If you have it in mpg, mov or avi, I’d like to get a copy so I can step through it frame by frame. It looks like you’re staying back far too long and, as a result, the back hip never really rotates fully. The centre of gravity needs to get forward more to get your release point and upper body out over the front foot. Your c.o.g. stays back behind the front foot through release.

A video that Quicktime can play would help a lot.


#4

My first impression is that you’re taking a REALLY long stride. I think this can be problematic for two reasons…

  1. It can limit hip/shoulder separation (not everyone is as flexible as Roy Oswalt). Your hips can’t turn as much as they should because your PAS foot has to stay back there for balance.

  2. It lowers the release point.


#5

your also landing with your left foot pointing towards third base, can cause arm and back problems, ex. kerry wood, did this and has never been the same since he was young


#6

This can be caused by taking too long of a stride. The back foot has to stay back there for balance.

If you take a shorter stride, you can get more of your weight onto your front leg, which lets the PAS foot come forward (which means the hips keep turning).


#7

This can be caused by taking too long of a stride. The back foot has to stay back there for balance.

If you take a shorter stride, you can get more of your weight onto your front leg, which lets the PAS foot come forward (which means the hips keep turning).[/quote]so chris, would the foot dragging be a result of this too, cause i do it and want to change it badly, i never get the leg swing that the pros get, would a shorter stride help?


#8

I don’t think this is a big deal.

I think Kerry Wood’s problems have a different root cause.


#9

This can be caused by taking too long of a stride. The back foot has to stay back there for balance.

If you take a shorter stride, you can get more of your weight onto your front leg, which lets the PAS foot come forward (which means the hips keep turning).[/quote]so chris, would the foot dragging be a result of this too, cause i do it and want to change it badly, i never get the leg swing that the pros get, would a shorter stride help?[/quote]

Foot dragging may be a sign of overstriding.

If you have to drag your foot, then that means your weight is too far back of your GS foot. It has to drag (stay on the ground) to maintain your balance.

If you shorten your stride, then your weight will be more on your GS leg which means your PAS leg can come free of the rubber (and maybe slightly in the air) which means your hips can keep turning which means that they will more powerfully pull your shoulders around.


#10

good, well i always thought my stride was too long and tried to change it, i just cant do it, any tips to shorten your stride, cause mines somewhere around 72 inches and im 6’6, so it should be around 60-66


#11

[quote=“dm59”]What format is the video in? If you have it in mpg, mov or avi, I’d like to get a copy so I can step through it frame by frame. It looks like you’re staying back far too long and, as a result, the back hip never really rotates fully. The centre of gravity needs to get forward more to get your release point and upper body out over the front foot. Your c.o.g. stays back behind the front foot through release.

A video that Quicktime can play would help a lot.[/quote]

Dm the video is mov format. Send me an email (santijo@optonline.net) so I can send you the whole file (it’s 39mb) or if you could recommend a host site.

I used to have the back leg come up but since I started playing with my mechanics and working on this shoulder / hip seperation thing it no longer comes up.

Thanks for the feedback. It was exactly what I was looking for.


#12

Your stride is not too long just because it isn’t in that range. :roll: It does NOT have to be in that range you specified. Nolan Ryan had a stride length longer than his height. So did Tom House. Your stride should be as long as possible while still being able to maintain good posture and balance and have good hip rotation. If you can’t maintain one of these attributes, then maybe your stride is too long.

However, before you go shortening your stride (which will change your timing, by the way), you should first consider getting your hips moving sooner and faster to build up more momentum. Too many times coaches tell pitchers to make an adjustment by descreasing one attribute when they really should be increasing another attribute. Maybe you need to get going and get out over the front foot more. (This would be in line with DM’s comment above.) Then maybe your stride will actually be just right. :wink:

Note that these are general comments in reaction to the reply above. I haven’t reviewed the above video yet (though I will shortly).


#13

Tanner. You are correct (about the hips opening up early) but it might be because as others pointed out that my stride is too long ad the only way I can open them up is to start them early. Maybe this is why I am having such tough time with opening up the hips at the last instant.

So far I have… shorten stride… rotate hips at last instant… point lead foot more towards home plate. I look forward to DM’s feedback also.


#14

Whoa! That video comes up sideways. Am I the only one with this issue?


#15

Yeah. I took it with the camera sideways. Forgot about that :?


#16

haha the same here. Fortunately I’m on a laptop so I just turned it around hehe instead of turning my head hehe

Sorry, but I don’t think I can really help you JKDJose, but what problems are you experiencing? Control issues? Loss of velocity? Pain?

I have the same problem as you, my back foot stays sideways while my front foot has already planted. I feel like when I turn it sooner I can hit the strike zone easier. I’m constantly missing high now and when I do this I can throw it lower.


#17

Well I have been working on what DM said to get the center of gravity moving forward… (he was right… my weight was back way too much. This was restricting my back side from coming through! What a difference, velocity jumped up big time… like 10 mph… (yes I have a gun). I will give it a couple of weeks and then post more video after trying the suggestions made in this post.

Thanks for the feedback!


#18

BTW, don’t worry about your back foot dragging. That is normal. The top pitchers in the game drag their back foot and they don’t lift it off the ground until after they release the ball. It’s part of rotating the shoulders around an upright spine and keeping the spine upright into release.

If you get your c.o.g. going, then dragging the back foot is a non-issue.


#19

Ok, I reviewed the video on my laptop so I could rotate the screen instead of my head. :stuck_out_tongue:

My take is that it looks like you keep your weight back and then reach with the front foot. This results in a slight rearward lean of your upper torso. You also seem to (sometimes) open the front foot early.

Since you said you’re working on separation of hips and shoulders, let me make a comment. Separation needs to occur while the total body tracks forward. You don’t want the shoulders to stay back while the hips go forward. Not sure if that’s what you’re trying to do.

My suggestion would be to try getting the hips going sooner so that you get your weight out front more. Since you don’t appear to start the hips forward until after your knee lift has peaked and your knee is on its way back down, I recommend starting the hips forward closer to when the knee lift peaks. This will let you build more linear momentum down the hill which will then be translated into rotational momentum and help make hip and shoulder rotation more explosive. Separation will be determined by your flexibility and by the timing your front arm gives you. In other words, the glove arm can’t do something that takes away the timing needed to delay shoulder rotation while the hips open up. Things like dropping the glove or pulling the glove can cause your shoulders to open up too soon.


#20

[quote=“JKDJose”]Here are a couple of pictures of me pitching trying to work on shoulder / hip seperation. All feed back is greatly appreciate!!

I have posted the video at the bottom

In this one my hips looked closed and my back foot has not turned over, which believe me is very hard to do.

In this one I tried very hard to get that back foot to be laces down when at foot plant. This is probably the best I have ever done this.

Here’s the video of the whole thing

http://s33.photobucket.com/albums/d59/santaigo/?action=view&current=DSCN1305.flv[/quote]

You would be doing yourself a favor by listening what Roger and D.M. have told you. Separation between the upper/lower is key for a pitcher to reach his max potential. It is NOT an instant panacea for success. As one poster on this site seems to be fixated with one single aspect of the pitching delivery, important all be it but again NOT an instant panacea for success. Perhaps more importantly may be impossible for some to pull off for strength reasons more than any other reason.

Your stride is not to far. Your stride may be to far for the amount of effort/force/energy your developing from your backside its pretty much nonexistant. That may arise from several other reasons and I can GUARANTEE you that those have NOTHING to do with separation between the lower and upper. In your case you could have what may be deemed as perfect separation BUT your not going into landing with enough force to have that perfect separatrion do anything for you or enhance your potential. To me your biggest problem may be in what your trying to achieve aside from the lack of good powerful lower drive while staying stacked. It seems like your main goal, which is valiant, is to get your hips WAY in front of your upper. The problem you have is your doing exactley what D.M. I believe said. Your center of gravity is also stopping leaving you looking like your ready to heave something uphill instead of pitch a baseball. That is NOT a result of to long of stride. That is a DIRECT result from not staying stacked WHILE MOVING OUT without enough energy to boot. Its also a posture ineffiency. Not meaning to digress but this is a perfect example of why “backward chaining” is good from a learning point. In other words stop the video at the exact time you hit footplant and actually SEE the position of your body/posture. From there you GO BACK and see what CAUSED you to get into this position. Meaning if you see the adverse effect first you than can go back and find the cause. You do not see the cause than go find the effect. The bottom line for you is you need to get your center of masss moving and keep it going INTO footplant WHILE staying stacked and connected as well as keeping good posture the whole time.