Work so Far Part 2 (new video)


#1

Here’s the video from today.

Explore Jose Santiago

Feedback is greatly appreciated. Goal is to be able to spot my pitches with fundamental mechanics so that I won’t destroy my arm.


#2

[quote=“JKDJose”]Here’s the video from today.

Explore Jose Santiago

Feedback is greatly appreciated. Goal is to be able to spot my pitches with fundamental mechanics so that I won’t destroy my arm.[/quote]

Some things I see…

  1. Action up to and through your stride looks good. Good leg lift, arm swing, and striding sideways.

  2. You still land with your GS toe pointing a little too much toward the 3B side of Home. This is probably related to number 3.

  3. It looks like your shoulders are still rotating too soon, which reduces the separation between your hips and your shoulders. I would try to keep your GS upper arm (if not your glove) pointed to the 3B side of the batter for longer. I think you’re pulling your glove in too soon. You could also try not pulling in your glove and instead throwing your glove out there and then letting your body come to it. Either way, it looks like your shoulders are still turning to soon.

  4. I would keep working on increasing the flexibility of your torso.


#3

Thanks Chris. Believe me, I try to point my foot closer to home plate but I can’t. I believe that my pitching delivery will not get any better until my torso flexibility improves.

Does anyone have any stretches in mind to help me?


#4

[quote=“JKDJose”]Believe me, I try to point my foot closer to home plate but I can’t. [/quote]My belief here is that you are possibly in too much of a hurry to get the foot down, thus not providing time to rotate into landing. Also, it looks from this angle (which makes it difficult to really see) as if your c.o.g. doesn’t actually move toward the target until well after your front foot has dropped all the way down.

I’d suggest 3 things:

  1. As soon as that front knee reaches its apex, start getting that c.o.g. moving toward the target.
  2. Keep it moving longer.
  3. Rotate to get the knee pointing at the target.

#5

DM59. I see what you mean. I am basically still stuck with this balance point mentality which was the way I was taught to pitch in high school and college.

Would it be correct to keep the stride leg up while striding towards the plate? Sort of pushing my butt towards the plate? When I do that it feels like I am going fall on my butt.

Here’s the other angle for the video from today.

Explore Jose Santiago

#6

[quote=“JKDJose”]Would it be correct to keep the stride leg up while striding towards the plate? Sort of pushing my butt towards the plate? When I do that it feels like I am going fall on my butt.[/quote]I wouldn’t go that far. I wouldn’t attempt to “keep the stride leg up”. I’d just think about getting the body going WHILE the leg is naturally coming down. I’ll email you a couple of still images ( :shock: Easy now Chris :D) that show just this. Not that one should necessarily strive for this but there are those who do it more than others. Sometimes, it’s a point that you go through because of the fact that you’re driving the front hip away from it’s support. The leg then catches up.

My advice is similar to what I just suggested to Tanner earlier this evening. Let’s simplify for a bit, as an exercise. Think about driving the front hip toward the target, then rotate the cp out of your back foot, leg and hip into landing, then rotate the torso like hl to throw. Don’t worry about anything else, especially your finish. Just relax and go for it.

Your back foot remains down far too long. It should be turned over nearly all the way by the time you land. That would mean you start turning it earlier. Not at the beginning of the stride, mind you but somewhere in the middle, as you approach landing. It’s part of your stride. You don’t stride, then rotate, like some out there seem to think you should. The pros don’t do that but it does get thrown about in some circles. Think of the back foot rotating and extending along with extending the rear leg, as part of the forward momentum generation.

So, hip moves to target just at the top of the knee lift, then say half way through the stride rotate and extend the back foot, leg and hip into landing, then fire away. Don’t hold back rotation.


#7

what is “c.o.g”?

This looks much better than the other one… You may be rotating your shoulder just a little bit to early, but when you focused on delaying them in that first video, it created more problems, it seemed to throw a lot of things out of wack, so I would advise that you not worry about getting such seperation right now.


#8

c.o.g. is “centre of gravity”