Work on hitting or pitching?


#1

I am having trouble deciding on whether or not to focus on pitching or hitting on off-weeks. Here are my stats from last season (if it matters): * = team leading

Hitting:
AB H 2B* HR RBI* BB SO HBP* SB* AVG
50 13 4 0 18 9 7 2 20 .260

Pitching:
IP ERA SO BB
12 19.89 4 9

As you can see my stats for hitting are far better. But the problem is my coach is reworking my swing and im having difficulties with that. As for pitching my stats were really bad, and im still working on my slider. Help?


#2

Work on both of them. No reason you can’t spend time working on pitching AND hitting.

If you really want to give undivided attention to one of them then you will know what it is. I would recommend hitting. Based on your stats (I’ve never seen video of you) I’d say that In all likelihood you are probably more apt to hit.

I guess decide whether you want to get that average up or that era down.

If you can though, work on both. You have a lot of room for improvement in both areas.


#3

[quote=“Johnny Cello”]I am having trouble deciding on whether or not to focus on pitching or hitting on off-weeks. Here are my stats from last season (if it matters): * = team leading

Hitting:
AB H 2B* HR RBI* BB SO HBP* SB* AVG
50 13 4 0 18 9 7 2 20 .260

Pitching:
IP ERA SO BB
12 19.89 4 9

As you can see my stats for hitting are far better. But the problem is my coach is reworking my swing and im having difficulties with that. As for pitching my stats were really bad, and im still working on my slider. Help?[/quote]

The problem you have identified is a valid one. There is only so much time available to devote to baseball, and how it gets used is important. I’d say the only person who can answer how to allocate your time though, is you. What do you want to do?

If you want to be the best hitter or best pitcher you can possibly be, you’ll have to totally give up the other one so you can devote all of your time and effort toward reaching your goal. But what generally goes on in youngsters is, they truly don’t know what they want to do because they haven’t had enough experience at either one yet.

The result is, and I think rightly so, that they try to become as versatile as possible in order to take advantage of the most opportunities possible. After all, you can’t really improve a lot by not being able to get into the game. That mindset means splitting time, and that means you have to prioritize everything.

The best I can make out is, you’re not yet in HS. Am I correct? Just trying to get a handle on where you’re at.

I can’t tell you how to break out your time allocations, but I can offer a teeny bit of help with your stats.

Right off the bat I can say that the stats you shared with us, are probably not the best indicators of performance. And, standing alone with no reference to compare them with other players makes it even more difficult to use them as any kind of measure.

Let’s look at the hitting stats 1st. The only thing I can confidently say about you, is that you have above average foot speed. Other than that, I’m in the dark. In the current game, the metric that’s come to be the most “popular” offensive stat is OBP. It isn’t a perfect stat in any way, shape, or form, but its infinitely superior to BA.

What many people have come to like even better than OBP though, is OPS. That’s a combination of OBP and SlgP, which not only gives some idea about a hitters ability to reach base, but how much power he has as well.

I see you showed RBIs which is ok, but not a stat I much care for on its own because its so dependent on who bats in front of you. I much prefer what I call run production which is a combination of RBIs and Runs scored.

One of my biggest problems with offensive stats is how heavily weighted people make hits. My reason for not caring for that isn’t so much that I don’t think hits are important, but rather that having scored for so long and at so many levels of amateur baseball, I know there can be a problem with how hits and errors are scored, and that in turn has a tremendous effect on BA, and also OBP and SlgP.

Although I do compute BA, what I do to try to remove any bias or lack of scoring skill on my part by including something else, Reached on Errors. I also sometimes include Reached on Fielder’s Choice too, as well as Walks and HBP’s, and what I end up with is a Reached Base Average. Now I can look at a player and have a much better idea about how likely he is to get on base.

If you’d like to see what those things look like in practice at the HSV level, go to http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/cbatting.pdf pages 19, 62, and 64.

While Wins/Losses, ERs, and IPs were pretty much the metrics pitchers were judged by, that’s also changed in the modern game. I do a little metric in order to have a way to measure the pitchers for myself. I look at what I call pitcher “mistakes”.

ERA has given way to something very easy to compute, and a much better indication of a pitcher’s skills. WHIP has become almost as common as ERA, and in many people’s minds has replaced it as well.

While IPs are still used to give some idea about a pitchers time on the mound, in the amateur game the number of pitches and the amount of rest has been something people are interested in.

If you’d like to see examples of those things, you can go to
http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/cpitching.pdf pages 16, 20, and 30.

There are about a million other metrics, and each shows something different, and therefore each has value. The more you know, the more easily you can pick out those things you need to work on more than others.

Good luck! :wink:


#4

Thx scorekeeper. I guess you might want to look at those stats you mentioned?

OBP: .393 (4th)
OPS: .733 (5th)
Run Production: 30 (2nd)

WHIP: 3.079 (?)

You mentioned somewhere that a comparison to my teammates would be good so i put a ranking next to them.


#5

[quote=“Johnny Cello”]Thx scorekeeper. I guess you might want to look at those stats you mentioned?

OBP: .393 (4th)
OPS: .733 (5th)
Run Production: 30 (2nd)

WHIP: 3.079 (?)

You mentioned somewhere that a comparison to my teammates would be good so i put a ranking next to them.[/quote]

Judging only by those numbers, here’s what I’d say. Compared to the other hitters, you seem to be in pretty good shape. Of course there are other things that are involved, but just from those numbers I have to assume you’re at least a well above average hitter.

Now pitching is something else again. At any level, a 3+ WHIP is pretty bad, and to me there’s little doubt that the main reason is because of your walks. Youngsters hear from coaches all the time that they have to throw strikes and not walk batters, but while that advice is absolutely on the money, IMHO, that advice would be a lot more effective if those coaches would show the P’s as many effects of walks as possible.

Go back to the combined pitching data on my site http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/cpitching.pdf and go to pages 121 thru 124. Look closely at what happens when the 1st pitch is a strike or ball, and what the likelihood of something happening after is. Look especially at BBs and Ks, but I think its pretty easy to say that in general, more good things happen when the 1st pitch is a strike as opposed to a ball.

Then take a look at pages 72 thru 74. It shouldn’t be too difficult to figure out what that one shows you. Look at the percentage of total runs that score that are either a walk or a HBP! Remember, both of them are directly attributed to the pitcher, and for both, there is absolutely nothing the defense can do to try to keep them off the bases.

Next, take a close look at page 75 and see if you can figure out what its telling you. After you’ve figured that one out, go to pages 76 thru 81 and see if you can figure out where the different individuals were helping or hurting themselves.

You already know about strike percentage and 1st pitch strike percentage, so I’m hoping you’re getting to see a more clear picture why you should be doing some of the things you’re being told to. :wink:


#6

Im not sure if this affects WHIP but I rarely have a walk. I tend to me lay a pumpkin down the middle instead.


#7

Here’s the definition of WHIP from Baseball Almanac:

[color=blue][i](Hits + Walks) divided by Innings Pitched

An extremely popular statistic that is primarily used and discussed with the Fantasy Leagues and Rotisserie Leagues. Developed to measure the approximate numbers of walks and hits a pitcher allows in each inning he pitches then compares the value received to other pitchers to formulate a pitcher’s index. [/i][/color]

The reason I made my assumption about your pitching and walks, is that you said you had 9 walks in 12 innings pitched. That by itself would be a WHIP of 0.75 if you never gave up a hit. It would be a walk every 1 1/3 innings or 4 outs.

I’m not trying to scare you at all because there’s no reason to be worried. Like every other metric, all WHIP does is give you a way to measure your pitching performance compared to others. If you looked at the WHIP metric on my site, you should have seen the little note at the top. A good WHIP for a ML pitcher is considered to be 1.00, anything below 1.00 is considered to be outstanding, and anything over 1.75 is considered to be poor.

But those are ML pitchers, the very best pitchers in the world! That’s why I wanted you to see the WHIPS of the pitchers I score for, who are HSV pitchers. The “average” WHIP for a pitcher on our team is 1.38, but the “average” whip for all the pitchers in regular season games I’ve scored, is 1.73.

Last season our average JV pitcher was 1.75 and the average for all JV pitchers in our games was 2.13. I don’t know where you’re at as far as your level, but as you can see, as the levels get lower, the WHIP goes up, and the biggest reason is usually the walks. As pitchers gain skill, they walk fewer batters and the WHIP comes down. Your WHIP of 3.08 is definitely high, but certainly isn’t very worrisome to me, as long as you know what your weak point is and work on it. :wink: