Work down


#1

I have a kid who has good mechanics til he throws the ball. he can’t get the ball down, him working down is at the letters. IS his arm lagging behind his body or is it as simple as he just not finishing his pitch. no video. any theory’s and any ways to correct this. drills etc. thanks.


#2

Well, make sure he follows through… if hes having a problem thriowing low then get his release point fixed. Something to do is have him one hop it it to the catcher… then just get it up by there.


#3

[quote=“SchillingBeckett”]Well, make sure he follows through… if hes having a problem thriowing low then get his release point fixed. Something to do is have him one hop it it to the catcher… then just get it up by there.[/quote] no he can’t get the ball down everything is up.


#4

if he tried he could throw it in the dirt. Have him hold on to the ball longer… before he releases


#5

cardsdave33:
There’s a old pitching drill called a “chair drill” you mite try.
Take a chair or a bench and put it 20 feet or so from a wall.
Have your pitcher from the set position , put the arch of his pivot (post) foot on the chair, and shuffle ahead with his stride foot till its the proper length in front of him with the toe’s pointing toward the target. (proper stride length is where the belt/belly button is over a bent front knee at release)
Without moving the stride leg , the pitcher will throw a ball softly at a low target —concentrating on rolling the foot on the chair so the toes are facing down , heel up .and transferring the body weight to the stride (front) leg and following through with the pitching arm finishing below and across the front knee. THE FOOT ON THE CHAIR STAYS ON THE CHAIR.
Note: This drill can be done inside the house using a ball of rolled up sox and throwing low at a taped spot on a bedroom door.
Remind him to " think low on the release"
Another reminder I haven’t heard in a while " throw your chin at the target on release".
This drill should help, cause it sounds to me like he’s got a “Rushing” porblem where his lower body is basic’ly finishing ahead of his upper body causing high release.
Bill


#6

Sounds like a timing problem. If he’s doing anything that causes him to open up early, then his throwing arm will drag and his release point will move back and up resulting in high pitches. Look for mechanical flaws such as balance and posture problems, pulling the glove, dropping the glove, abbreviated glove arm movement (i.e. not getting into an equal and opposite arm position at foot strike), staying back, etc. A good checkpoint would be to look at the release point to see if it is 8"-12" in front of the front foot.


#7

[quote=“Bill Chapones”]cardsdave33:
There’s a old pitching drill called a “chair drill” you mite try.
Take a chair or a bench and put it 20 feet or so from a wall.
Have your pitcher from the set position , put the arch of his pivot (post) foot on the chair, and shuffle ahead with his stride foot till its the proper length in front of him with the toe’s pointing toward the target. (proper stride length is where the belt/belly button is over a bent front knee at release)
Without moving the stride leg , the pitcher will throw a ball softly at a low target —concentrating on rolling the foot on the chair so the toes are facing down , heel up .and transferring the body weight to the stride (front) leg and following through with the pitching arm finishing below and across the front knee. THE FOOT ON THE CHAIR STAYS ON THE CHAIR.
Note: This drill can be done inside the house using a ball of rolled up sox and throwing low at a taped spot on a bedroom door.
Remind him to " think low on the release"
Another reminder I haven’t heard in a while " throw your chin at the target on release".
This drill should help, cause it sounds to me like he’s got a “Rushing” porblem where his lower body is basic’ly finishing ahead of his upper body causing high release.
Bill[/quote]

Funny we did do this drill before I wrote this and will continue to do so.


#8

Roger thanks for the insight I will look for these.


#9

Sounds like he’s rushing; that he’s trying to get too much power from his stride and screwing up his timing.

If so, then he needs to not stride forward so hard.

Read this…


#10

Chris – regarding your pictures of Francis, Wood, Hennessey et al who are “rushing” … I wouldn’t use the word “rushing” for that.

It seems the point your trying to make is that the forearms of their throwing arms are not vertical at the point of planting the front leg. This would suggest that their arms are LATE, that they are LAGGING or delayed …

If I get your correctly, it is this lagging that will upset the positioning of their pitching arms as they rotate their shoulders … right?

it just seems confusing to call this rushing… rushing in this context would imply to me that their forearms and shoulders would be turning at the point the foot plants.


#11

I suppose you mean they’re rushing their lower halves ahead of their arms … But I always associate timing and staying back as an upper body concern, thinking the emphasis should be on getting the shoulder and hip seperation by delaying shoulder rotation.


#12

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]Chris – regarding your pictures of Francis, Wood, Hennessey et al who are “rushing” … I wouldn’t use the word “rushing” for that. It seems the point your trying to make is that the forearms of their throwing arms are not vertical at the point of planting the front leg. This would suggest that their arms are LATE, that they are LAGGING or delayed …

If I get your correctly, it is this lagging that will upset the positioning of their pitching arms as they rotate their shoulders … right?

it just seems confusing to call this rushing… rushing in this context would imply to me that their forearms and shoulders would be turning at the point the foot plants.[/quote]

Andrew, I hear you but…

First, I’m trying to stick with what is generally called rushing. Perhaps “Late Arm” or “Lagging Arm” are other (or better) terms for what’s going on. However, I think that rushing is the generally used term.

Second, I believe that a late or lagging arm is generally the result of rushing (the lower body).

Third, as I understand the problem, what happens is that if you speed up the lower body and get to footstrike sooner (by striding forward faster), then the PAS arm will not be in the correct position at the moment the shoulders start to turn (and it’s important to keep in mind that in most cases the shoulders start to turn at or just after footstrike).


#13

This isn’t the right way to think about it because, in most cases, the shoulders will start to turn (almost automatically) as soon as the GS foot plants. In other words, the upper and lower bodies are pretty tightly synchronized by default. In my experience only in very rare cases (e.g. drop and drivers like Tom Seaver) is there a significant delay between the plant of the GS foot and the rotation of the shoulders.

With respect to hip/shoulder separation, since shoulder rotation pretty much automatically starts when the GS foot plants, the two things to work on (in this order) are…

  1. Making sure the shoulders stay closed as the hips open into the planting of the GS foot.

  2. Keeping the shoulders from rotating until just after the GS foot plants.

In my experience, it’s much easier to work on 1 than 2 (since 2 seems to happen pretty much automatically).