Wood Bats


#1

Which wood bat is a better bat. Ash or Maple?


#2

Here’s an article to read (might help you with your question).


#3

I personally have a maple/bamboo wood bat. The handle is maple, the barrel is bamboo, and I love the bat. I got it for $35 (usually $75, but we have a deal with the company), and so far it has been great for everyone on the team.


#4

It wouldn’t make any difference with Mariano Rivera pitching. We all know how he breaks bats! :slight_smile:


#5

Here is some advice from a current pro player:

" As far as wood goes: I use Maple but it really is personal preference. Maple is a little heavier, and lasts longer. Ash can be made a little lighter but tends to start to flake if you use them too much. I do know that professional players get better quality wood than the stuff sent out for retail. I actually just visited the bat factory that makes my bats and they had all their wood separated into “Pro” and “Retail” piles. Last year I used Nokona bats, but the guy that made them just started his own company called Axis, so I will be using his bats this year. They usually ship around 18 bats to our spring training complex, and if during the year I need more they will send them out to our stadium. I don’t bone my bats but that’s because I use Maple and you don’t need to bone them. I know a lot of guys that use Ash do like to bone their hitting surfaces. Hope this helped. If you have anymore questions let me know. Take care!"


#6

What do you think boning a bat does that you need to do it for ash but not maple?


#7

re: “What do you think boning a bat does that you need to do it for ash but not maple?”

--------I don’t really have an opinion about it. The quote in my post was exerpted from a note written by someone who is familiar with wood bats because he uses them in his job. I thought the subject matter in the note, as a whole, was relevant to the OP’s question.

Aside from this person’s opinion, which is self-evident from his remarks, you can undoubtedly find lots more opinion about “boning” the surface of wood bats elsewhere on the internet. Historically, it was a popular thing to do. In fact, you can probably bone up on the subject to your heart’s content. ha ha.


#8

[quote=“laflippin”] --------I don’t really have an opinion about it. The quote in my post was exerpted from a note written by someone who is familiar with wood bats because he uses them in his job. I thought the subject matter in the note, as a whole, was relevant to the OP’s question.

Aside from this person’s opinion, which is self-evident from his remarks, you can undoubtedly find lots more opinion about “boning” the surface of wood bats elsewhere on the internet. Historically, it was a popular thing to do. In fact, you can probably bone up on the subject to your heart’s content. ha ha.[/quote]

Just goes ta show ya, just because someone uses a piece of equipment in his work, it doesn’t mean he know a great deal about it. :wink:

My dad was a finish carpenter and cabinet maker for over 60 years, so when I 1st heard about boning a bat as a very young kid, guess who I asked about it? He explained to me how it closed the pores of the wood, helping keep out water and making the surface harder. Now with today’s finishes, that prolly isn’t nearly as important as in days gone by, but it hasn’t got a whole lot to do with the type of wood.

Wood bats are all made with some kind of hardwood, with some being harder than others. But if you know much about the history of bats, in the old days, hickory was what was mostly used, and its much harder than the hardest maple, is harder than ash. Trouble is, its also about 20% heavier as well, and that’s why bats began to shift to ash. But the old players used to bone bats, even when they were almost all hickory. If this current player doesn’t understand that even a maple bat might benefit from being “boned”, I’m not surprised. :wink:

Now it could be my dad was full of BS as a Christmas goose, but from what research I’ve done, he’s the one I’d listen to on this one. lol!


#9

You two keep this up and I’m going to have to look outside and see if the world is coming to an end :shock: :lol: (It ain’t 2012 yet is it???)

I can see ash because of the pores and grain, where maple’s grain is closed…and when sanded just shy of waterproof.


#10

[quote=“jdfromfla”]You two keep this up and I’m going to have to look outside and see if the world is coming to an end :shock: :lol: (It ain’t 2012 yet is it???)

I can see ash because of the pores and grain, where maple’s grain is closed…and when sanded just shy of waterproof.[/quote]

OK. I bow to someone with great expertise in hardwoods.