Wood Bat Info


#1

Here’s a great source for info on wood bats. You’ll find the expertise to know what’s-what if you have serious intentions of going pro and what’s expected of you swinging lumber.

http://www.slugger.com/technology/wood.html

Then take a look at an example of a wood bat and the grain that the web page obove is talking about.

http://www.slugger.com/baseball/wood/mlb/gs318hr.html

Do you wonder why a pitch, hard on the inside, cracks a wooden bat if not swung properly? Take a look at the grain of the bat on the web page below and you’ll find the “ring tail” grain - that semi-circle wood ring, that extends down the handle (barrel) can be a factor.

http://www.slugger.com/baseball/wood/mlb/gi13el.html

Selecting a wooden bat requires a lot a practice, along with how to use the bat properly. Tight grains and balance vary from model to model, and even with the same model types. Wood is a natural product of nature, and as such, no two wooden bats will be the same with respect to balance and feel. So it helps your game, not to mention the duration of your wooden bat, to put all the right factors together.

What factors? Here are some of the things to consider:

Are you a full swing, chopper, sinking ball hitter, hacker, what?
Are you a power hitter or a contact hitter?
Do you make contact in front of your leading hip, at mid point (belly), or at the back off your rear hip?
What is your prime hittable pitch - FB inside, FB outside, up or down (away), sinker, slider, curve, what?
What is you body type - heavy set, bulky, muscular, slim, tall, compact?
Can you place hit, or do you just swing away and let lady luck take it from there?

A wooden bat is a tool that should be “used” by a craftsman that knows himself/herself pretty darn good. Like any tradesman/tradeswomen you use the right tool for the right job. Sounds simiple enough, but it’s not. And like any craftsman/craftswomen, you have to go through a process of being an apprentice - journeyman/journeywoman phase that’s as frustrating as it can be rewarding.

The bottom line to all this is, if you plan to make this a living, I mean really intend on making money at this game, as a business, somewhere along the line you’ve got to collect and understand the tools of this trade.

Coach B.