Winter Workouts


#1

I am 13, going to be 14 in December, I haven’t really lifted weights or anything except running and cardio work.

Does anyone have any ideas on what my winter workouts should look like?

How many times a week, what exercises, how often should I run, how often should I throw a bullpen, long toss and if you have ideas even hitting (3,5 or 6 spot hitter) and fielding (I play 1st, 2nd and outfield too)?

Thanks for any help!


#2

I’m only 14 myself, so i’m sure some other people can give you better info, but heres what i like to have. I split my days into upper body, lower body, and then med ball/plyo’s. I try to do these all twice a week, but start out with once a week and build up. Make sure you have the heavy lifting, cardio, explosion/power, and throwing parts all in your workouts. If you have never lifted before concentrate a little more on the heavy lifting and you should see some nice gains.


#3

#4
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#5

Yeah, right. Our warmups take longer than that. Each day.


#6

Yeah, right. Our warmups take longer than that. Each day.[/quote]

Haha, well you can’t argue with science. I’m also sure you look kinda chubby lol, big boy


#7

Yeah, right. Our warmups take longer than that. Each day.[/quote]

Haha, well you can’t argue with science. I’m also sure you look kinda chubby lol, big boy[/quote]

And I’m sure he’d kick your butt in a squatting contest


#8

You’re right. You can’t argue with science. As in, science doesn’t back up any of your beliefs in Nautilus workouts over free weight training. Or that higher bodyweight is correlated with faster release velocities.

But I’m sure you know all this, since you’ve studied it for the past five years. As evidenced by linking to twelve minute workouts on Amazon.


#9

I’ve been told that I shouldn’t really lift weight until at least next summer (when i am 14), you know for growth plates and all. Is this just things that I have heard.

I don’t turn 14 till December. I’m 5’9", 130, not chubby at all but growing all the time.


#10

Yeah, right. Our warmups take longer than that. Each day.[/quote]

Haha, well you can’t argue with science. I’m also sure you look kinda chubby lol, big boy[/quote]

you are unbelievable.


#11

Those myths are not true. A google search will confirm it.


#12

[quote=“buwhite”]I’ve been told that I shouldn’t really lift weight until at least next summer (when i am 14), you know for growth plates and all. Is this just things that I have heard.

I don’t turn 14 till December. I’m 5’9", 130, not chubby at all but growing all the time.[/quote]

If you can’t start lifting weights - start some general strength building exercises that you can do isometrically - sissy squats, pistol squats, pushups, pullups, etc. at 14 years old these exercises will help you build strength.

Sometimes a scientific source won’t get by a parent who doesn’t want you to start lifting weights.


#13

My son went through the same thing when he started to think more seriously about pitching and starting some kind of off season/pre season workout routine.

I would suggest starting with what you want to achieve. What do you want to gain from your workout, flexibility, strength, size, endurance… ? I’m assuming this is baseball specific, pitching focused?

I would suggest avoiding goals like gaining more velocity. Focus on goals specific to your training regime, achieve those goals, and then work on your mechanics to let your added strength, flexibility, etc… express themselves in your pitching.

The first thing to understand is that you’re not going to get a generic training regime recommendation from most people who are serious about working out on these boards.

Your training regime needs to be specific to you and your needs.

When my son started looking into a workout routine, he and I had a lot of the same fears and believed some of the same myths about working out with weights that are prevalent in the general community.

Working out with weights should not be a problem at your age, but working out with weights and lifting incorrectly or lifting too much weight without maintaining correct form or choosing the wrong kinds of weight lifting exercises for your needs would cause problems.

Look, do a little research on weight lifting exercises that baseball players/pitchers do to keep themselves in shape.

Kyleb and others turned my son and I on to Eric Cressey’s web site as a reference: http://ericcressey.com/baseball-content

He has some excellent content and an expert’s perspective on some do’s and don’ts in developing a workout routine.

My son’s routine is built around developing core and leg strength while improving flexibility and range of motion. His upper body routine is based around working with dumbbells; medicine ball exercises; and non weight lifting exercises like pushups, pullups, and chinups; and lots of stretching.

I would suggest finding a range of exercises, stretching, and cardio work that fits together in a program for you. Then make sure that you start slowly and learn how to do everything correctly and then do your exercises correctly.

A lot people spend a lot of wasted effort in doing exercises incorrectly, which can be a waste of time and effort and worse a cause of injury.


#14

Thanks for all your advice, I worked out with a new coach this week and he gave me some help on how to use bands, I liked the stretches and exercises, I am going to start there for a few weeks.


#15

Hey buwhite,

Also coming with your age is the increase in bat wight which posed a huge problem for me in middle school. I’m sure you’ve already experienced this and I was actually able to create a very affective way to increase bat speed and make you bat feel lighter in you hands. It is basically a weighted bat work out and takes less than 30 min. on average and I am doing it myself to prepare for the spring season.

The best way to get used to a -3 bat weight is to use wood in practice which is a lot heavier, but it is difficult to take batting practice while its snowing unless you have an indoor facility which can become very expensive. So I created a workout that targets all of your swinging muscles in your arms and upper body.

Alls you need is a bat (any weight but preferably as heavy as possible) and a couple of contour foam ankle weights.

----example of the pair I have----

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160485090298&hlp=false&rvr_id=163727811112&crlp=1_263602_304652&UA=WVS%3F&GUID=1db385ee12c0a0aa15405f70fff00931&itemid=160485090298&ff4=263602_304652

Now on to the workout.

  1. Wrap at least one weight around the bat and secure it with the strap (please note that the weight should be placed on the bat 2 inches lower than the ideal place and tighten as much as possible because it will slide forward slightly as you swing)

  2. Now take the baseball bat in your hands and do a good amount of chops like you would with an ax but stop when the bat is parallel to the ground. I do about 30.

3)Now take your bat and do a good amount of swings making sure that you focus on good form instead of speed. I do about 20.

  1. Now take your bat and touch it to your right shoulder. Then using a v pattern, put it on your left. When the bat reaches each shoulder count one. I do a about 30.

  2. Repeat as many times as desired.

  3. Wait 2 days and repeat exercises to allow muscles to heal.

  4. Another good idea is to take a little league bat and swing it as fast as you can to get the muscles used to moving faster.

I know that this works because I recently purchased a 31 oz/33 in. bat which felt heavy in my hands. After about two weeks of doing these exercises, I picked up my bat (on a day before I did the exercises) and it felt about 2 - 3 oz lighter and I had much more control over it. If you would like more detailed information or a video of the exercises please contact me.


#16

Swings with a baseball bat loaded with 10 lbs is going to be contraindicated and will change the mechanics of the swing. You can read any number of Dr. Coop DeRenne’s studies on this. I highly recommend against these concepts.


#17

I have actually given this much thought. I am constantly working on good mechanics which is what I strive to do whenever I swing a bat, even when I’m just looking at them in the store. I think about it so much that it has become second nature and I forgot to include it in the list. Before and after doing the bat exercises I take at least 20 swings with my best mechanics constantly looking at everything; stride, hand positions, barrel placement, etc. I am also trying to improve my swing as I do this. Also I used to be very off balanced when I would swing while taking batting practice. This got worse when I added the extra weight. But, I forced myself to try many different feet positions and I eventually found the one where I had the most balance, so swinging a heavy bat actually forced me to improve my mechanics.