Winter pitching


#1

When it’s cold out (like it is where I live),
what do you guys do to practice your pitching?
Where I am, I don’t have access to an indoor facility where I could practice.
So what should I be doing on days that it’s too cold outside
to practice pitching?


#2

[quote=“CardsWin”]When it’s cold out (like it is where I live),
what do you guys do to practice your pitching?
Where I am, I don’t have access to an indoor facility where I could practice.
So what should I be doing on days that it’s too cold outside
to practice pitching?[/quote]
If it isn’t wet from snow or sleet outside, I will go throw, unless it is below 30 degrees. I usually just bundle up.

If you have access to a gym, even just a basketball court, you can use this for flat ground work. All you have to do is be 60 feet apart with someone to catch you. Focus on control and mechanics, and essentially it is less stressful for your arm.

You can also do the towel drill just about anywhere that you have a little bit of room to move. I actually do it in my dorm room if I have spare time.

Remember, you do not always have to be pitching but should be throwing consistently.


#3

[quote=“CSOleson”][quote=“CardsWin”]When it’s cold out (like it is where I live),what do you guys do to practice your pitching?
Where I am, I don’t have access to an indoor facility where I could practice. So what should I be doing on days that it’s too cold outside
to practice pitching?[/quote]
If it isn’t wet from snow or sleet outside, I will go throw, unless it is below 30 degrees. I usually just bundle up.
If you have access to a gym, even just a basketball court, you can use this for flat ground work. All you have to do is be 60 feet apart with someone to catch you. Focus on control and mechanics, and essentially it is less stressful for your arm.
You can also do the towel drill just about anywhere that you have a little bit of room to move. I actually do it in my dorm room if I have spare time.
Remember, you do not always have to be pitching but should be throwing consistently.[/quote]

Lately, it has been less than 30 degrees here (southeast MO- it’s been in the 10s and 20s).
The indoor place I could throw in is about 45 ft. long.
I could practice throwing with somebody in there.
What is the towel drill? I’ve heard of it, but never used it or even really understood what it is.
Also, I’ve heard that the towel drill is not good for the elbow.
What do you think?


#4

[quote=“CardsWin”]Lately, it has been less than 30 degrees here (southeast MO- it’s been in the 10s and 20s).
The indoor place I could throw in is about 45 ft. long.
I could practice throwing with somebody in there.
What is the towel drill? I’ve heard of it, but never used it or even really understood what it is.
Also, I’ve heard that the towel drill is not good for the elbow.
What do you think?[/quote]
I understand, I currently live here in Iowa, so it is pretty cold.
45 ft is still throwing, and you can work out your arm by throwing longer and working on your grips and location.
I need someone to explain the towel drill, I don’t quite know how to explain that one.
I’ve heard nothing about it being bad for the elbow though, because you aren’t applying full force.


#5

[quote=“CSOleson”]I need someone to explain the towel drill, I don’t quite know how to explain that one.
I’ve heard nothing about it being bad for the elbow though, because you aren’t applying full force.[/quote]

I looked up the towel drill.
Apparently, it’s two main purposes are to: improve the ability of the pitcher to develop more arm extension out in front in an effort to get his throwing arm closer to the hitter
-And help with body and arm alignment…therefor creating better overall control.


#6

[quote=“CSOleson”]
I need someone to explain the towel drill, I don’t quite know how to explain that one.
I’ve heard nothing about it being bad for the elbow though, because you aren’t applying full force.[/quote]

I don’t know if the towel drill is actually bad for the elbow.
Some pitching coaches I’ve heard of have really endorsed the towel drill,
and others have not.
One of the reasons I’ve heard of for not doing the towel drill is that
when using a towel, the position of the pitcher’s trunk and his throwing hand is more horizontal and inline with his head than above his head when his arm is fully extended. The pitcher’s trunk will flex forward sooner
and he will lose trunk rotation. Since trunk rotation speed (not trunk flexion) determines arm speed, trunk rotation must occur before trunk flexion. In the towel drill, the early trunk flexion in exchange for trunk rotation happens because the pitcher holds onto the towel and is more concerned with extension of his arm and hand out in front than anything else. The only way that any pitcher can gain more extension is from more explosive mechanics and a longer stride. You cannot get it with just entending the arm more out in front because you will lose trunk rotation speed. This mechanics fault reduces velocity.