Will this curveball injure my arm?

Friend of mine played in college and showed me how to throw his curveball – however he has had a history of arm trouble.

The way he showed me to throw it (just arm action) is to turn the throwing hand right before it reaches the vertical point so the palm of the throwing hand is facing upward and to then to release with the palm facing upwards.

What are the implications of this pitch??

I agree with this part. Preset the angle so you don’t twist further while the arm is whipping forward.

This part I’m not so sure about. At release point, the hand should be on the side of the ball - not underneeth it. If you’re talking about ending up palm up after release, then that tells me you’re twisting which is a no-no.

I agree with this part. Preset the angle so you don’t twist further while the arm is whipping forward.

This part I’m not so sure about. At release point, the hand should be on the side of the ball - not underneeth it. If you’re talking about ending up palm up after release, then that tells me you’re twisting which is a no-no.[/quote]

After release my hand does pronate (palm faces inward) but right before release my hand is under the ball with my palm facing upward.

There is some misunderstanding going on here: Palm facing inward (toward your body–think: “karate chop”) is supination. Palm facing outward (away from your body–think: “back-handed catch”) is pronation.

Curveballs should be pre-set and released with supination, as if you were making a karate chop at the target. However, as Roger noted, there is no twisting or turning motion of the wrist at the release point.

Extra motion from your hand or wrist that occurs at, or approaching, the release point increases stress on your elbow because that motion needs to be changed into pronation shortly after releasing the ball (think: “shifting your transmission from 1st gear into reverse, while your car is moving”.)

Pronation happens naturally for all pitches, after the ball is released. If you release the ball from a stable pre-set orientation then stress is greatly reduced for all pitch-types (think: “shifting your transmission into reverse from neutral”)

Is the curveball like this one? :wink:

Very provocative video, antonio, but not necessarily recommendable.

Pitchers do not need to do anything that extreme to get downward break on their curveball.

A firm “karate-chop” release will give a curve with great topspin (and less stress on the elbow).

That guy’s hand rotates about 270 degrees into full pronation after release of the ball.

Throwing a more traditional curveball, your hand will only need to rotate about 180 degrees into full pronation after release.

Under the stress of a high-speed delivery you want less torsion on the elbow, not more.

Oh, don’t get me wrong man, I never recommended the curveball on the video did I? I posted it to clarify if that was the curveball the boy was taught by his friend since he was talking about having his palm up when throwing.

I agree that the guy in the video will probably end up with a screwed elbow or something. Not recommended to anyone.

[quote=". a n t o n i o . ."]Oh, don’t get me wrong man, I never recommended the curveball on the video did I? I posted it to clarify if that was the curveball the boy was taught by his friend since he was talking about having his palm up when throwing.

I agree that the guy in the video will probably end up with a screwed elbow or something. Not recommended to anyone.[/quote]

This is pretty much the curveball he showed me but there are some differences.

  1. The pronation that the pitcher on the video does after release is a lot more than what i was shown. The way I was shown to throw it was to start with the palm up and then after release to have my thumb facing up. In the video his thumb faces downward shortly after release.

  2. Also, I was shown to have my palm up…but not as far up as the guy in the video. With the ball in hand, instead of having my thumb facing 4 o’clock, it faces two or one o’clock.

Is this still dangerous?

The short answer is yes, it is dangerous. laflippin covered the rest.

extremely radical. i know of no one in the major leagues using this throwing motion. i would use a traditional approach. major league pitchers get their hand outside the ball and their palm is facing their head. there is no snapping of the wrist when you throw, you simply pull your hand straight down and the middle finger goes over the top of the ball.

if you make a pointing action like you did when you were playing guns as a kid, that is the motion you make with your hand. anything else could limit your performance or cause serious injury.

before you listen to someone, have them show you an example of a major leaguer doing what they are showing you. the video clip of the curveball on this thread does not breal very much. catfish hunter and bert blylevin had great curveballs using this motion.

Thank you everyone for the replies.

I thought it was prudent to ask about this curveball on the forum because the pitcher who taught me this has an injured elbow. I will pass this info onto him too in hopes that he does not further injure his elbow and I will not take his advice in throwing the curve this way.

I’ll try the normal approach with my palm facing my head to throw it.

Thanks again!

P.S. – if anyone can give me some advice on mechanics I started this thread but haven’t had anything said since I posted the video (I know its not the best video but any help is appreciated).

http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=10069