Why dont closers have so many pitches?


#1

How come most closers have like only 3 pitches? And like none of them have a curveball or breaking pitches, they mostly throw lilke fastballs and cutters and stuff like that…sliders sinkers…how come?


#2

A Slider is a breaking pitch.

And probably because most closers have above average fastballs. Why throw something else when you have an overpowering fastball?

And for the closers who don’t have 95+MPH fastballs, they usually have one great pitch they throw.

Mariano’s cutter, Hoffman’s change up, etc.


#3

because they have one or maybe two innings to work, they dont need to much variation, usually closers have a good fastball to work off of, so a slider/cutter are usually typical, to get a fast tight break. a guy like trevor hoffman who doesnt have a plus fastball he uses a change because he can change speeds at perfect times


#4

Many closers, not all, are strikeout pitchers. They throw exceptionally hard and are what we would call power pitchers. The slider is more of a power pitcher pitch. True many great power pitchers have had knee-buckling curves (Koufax, Verlander) but those were mainly starters and they needed that change of speeds from their fastball. Closers don’t need that since they face a hitter only once. That is why many are fastball/slider pitchers.


#5

The answer to the poll is “slider”.


#6

Much of the time you will find a closer who has just one pitch—and it is so devastating that he doesn’t need anything else. Joe Page, who probably ushered in the era of the closer, had one pitch—an absolutely overpowering fast ball. It was pure power, and he didn’t need anything more. And Mariano Rivera has that cutter which, when he’s really on, he will throw at 97 miles an hour. And he breaks bats—his last time out, in the third game of the ALDS, he broke a bat in securing the final out of that game. He also has a four-seam fast ball which is not nearly as effective as that cutter, so he rarely goes to it. 8)


#7

Closers are pitchers who don’t have enough arm strength to throw for multiple innings.
Therefore, they give it all for an inning or two.


#8

The Royal’s Soria throws at least 4 pitches - cut fastball (92 mph), slider (79 mph), curve (69 mph), and changeup (84 mph). He obviously throws the fastball the most, but will throw any of the others when he gets ahead.


#9

I’m not saying that all closers only have one or two great pitches.
I think all pitchers should be able to throw at least four or five decent pitches for strikes in any count.


#10

Back to the original question…

In pro ball, the best pitchers (highest draft picks, top prospects, bonus babies, etc.) in an organization are generally starters, because they get the most innings. Starters generally have 3 to 4 “plus” pitches. Pitchers with only 2 to 3 “plus” pitches are delegated to the bullpen, where they essentially fight it out for long relief, specialty situation, and short relief duty. Closers tend to fall into the role because of their mentality, and the way that mentality matches with the role. Not surprisingly, closers are really a different breed of relief pitcher. A lot of closers I played against, as well as in my own experience, we gained a few mph in the role of just coming in and throwing gas… We just didn’t focus on developing those other pitches b/c there’s very little opportunity to actually do that.


#11

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]Back to the original question…

In pro ball, the best pitchers (highest draft picks, top prospects, bonus babies, etc.) in an organization are generally starters, because they get the most innings. Starters generally have 3 to 4 “plus” pitches. Pitchers with only 2 to 3 “plus” pitches are delegated to the bullpen, where they essentially fight it out for long relief, specialty situation, and short relief duty. Closers tend to fall into the role because of their mentality, and the way that mentality matches with the role. Not surprisingly, closers are really a different breed of relief pitcher. A lot of closers I played against, as well as in my own experience, we gained a few mph in the role of just coming in and throwing gas… We just didn’t focus on developing those other pitches b/c there’s very little opportunity to actually do that.[/quote]

Can being a reliever affect a pitcher’s delivery at all?
I mean, is it OK for a reliever to put more stress on his arm since he only throws a few innings at most?


#12

They don’t tend to pitch through the lineup more than once…don’t need much if they haven’t seen your stuff.


#13

Most MLB closers were starters in the minors. This is because of the reasons Steven mentioned above: the best pitchers in the minors are the starters. You want your best pitchers to throw more innings and gain more experience.

Very few closers came through the system as closers. In recent years there has been a trend to draft college closers and breed them to be the closer of the future but that has ben very hit or miss.


#14

How does that apply in today’s game of baseball?
I mean, nowadays players have access to video of pitchers they have never seen before or heard of.