Why do pitchers throw what they do?

I’m talking about “stuff” here. Like, why do some pitchers throw a curveball, while others throw the slider (or split vs. sinker, circle vs. straight change, etc.) Is it that they choose one over the other, or are naturally able to throw that pitch while keeping consistent mechanics? Or is that they are mechanically inclined to throw certain pitches? For instance, I have similar mechanics to Dan Haren, does that make me a better candidate to throw a split-finger?

I can throw a lot of different pitches in practice, but what is the biggest factor when choosing “stuff”?

[quote=“ltdan”]I’m talking about “stuff” here. Like, why do some pitchers throw a curveball, while others throw the slider (or split vs. sinker, circle vs. straight change, etc.) Is it that they choose one over the other, or are naturally able to throw that pitch while keeping consistent mechanics? Or is that they are mechanically inclined to throw certain pitches? For instance, I have similar mechanics to Dan Haren, does that make me a better candidate to throw a split-finger?

I can throw a lot of different pitches in practice, but what is the biggest factor when choosing “stuff”?[/quote]

Well, It has something to do with mechanics. But in a certain way. Pitchers throw what works for them. Tim wakefield, for instance, throws a knuckle and a fastball, but that’s because the knuckle works for him and the fastball is there to keep them out of balance. I, for instance, I can’t throw a good change, so I will stick with what works for me, a curveball, a fastball and a slider. Now we come to mechanices, if you throw sidearm, you will get a hard time throwing splits, so you might as well throw a sinker, while it works better as a sidearm pitcher. But it just has to do with what works for you. I guess you are right with the Dan Haren-split-finger thing, but I’m more like a Santana guy, does that make me a circle-change pitcher? Probably not, I can’t throw change so well, but I’m working on it:P.

Guys who throw a split can’t throw a changeup. They use the split as their changeup. Anyone can throw a split, Randy Johnson throws it as his changeup. It all comes down to “feel”. The split is easier to throw for some than a change because you are using the index and middle fingers compared to the middle and ring fingers.

As far as mechanics goes, some sidearmers and submariners throw a curve as their slider. Byung-Hyun Kim, Chad Bradford, and Joe Smith just to name a few.

mechs do have something to do with it. like with the sidearm pitchers not really being able to throw the splitter. but its also work ethic. its takes alot of time to develop some pitches while other pitches are easy to get to do what you want them to. a circle change requires years of practice while a curveball can be learn in a matter of months or even weeks