Which arm slot is this?


#1

Can someone tell me what you would call this arm slot?


#2

3/4 in my opinion.


#3

3/4


#4

Thx guys. Sometimes I wonder if he’s getting too much on the side of the ball with this release.


#5

Nothing wrong with the arm slot, if it’s natural let him stick with it.


#6

A low arm slot and “getting around the side of the ball” are really two different things. It’s the supination of hand and forearm - regardless of arm slot - that are the concern.


#7

My son gets on the side of the ball and cuts his fastball most of the time. Works well but sacrifices velocity. I’ve assumed it’s his low arm slot. Needs to be able to get behind the ball better when he wants the faster 4seam. I’ve tried everything I can think of to help him but can’t figure out how to help him with it.


#8

I’d be very cautious about trying to get him to any “over the top” slot. Good chance he’ll change his posture and tilt his head & shoulders. Stay with the slot that’s natural for him.


#9

Not trying to have him get on top of ball but do want him to have his fingers more behind the center of the ball at release rather than a more cut fastball type release


#10

That sounds like the correct course of action. Hopefully some of the more knowledgeable on this site such a Roger & Coach Paul can give you some pointers.


#11

Roger has the answer right here, hand on the outside may lead to movement but it’s also the path to a sore arm. He should work on hand behind the ball, the simplest way I’ve found to practice that is by taking some electrical tape around the ball for 1 line, if he keeps his hand behind it the line will be there depending on slot \I/, if its not the line will wobble or not be there. Have him use that ball while he plays catch and he’ll self correct on his own.


#12

I’ve done that with the electrical tape. He can’t seem to be able to tell the diff. Some times he will throw a fastball that will be 5mph faster but he can never tell me what he did differently. I’m usually catching him. He has worked with a couple of different Former MLB pitchers who always talked about his cut fastball and getting more behind the ball when you need the increased velocity. It’s a great cutter just need the alternative. I think it’s the position of his wrist as he delivers. This has been a multi year challenge.


#13

I was going to suggest what JD suggested except drawing the stripe on the ball using a magic marker.

But maybe you need to back up to the beginning and check his grip. An off-center grip could lead to supination so make sure he grips the ball such that thumb and middle finger cut the ball in half. He should check himself by rotating his hand so he can see his fingertips and then mentally drawing a line from thumb to middle finger. That line should split the ball in half equally.


#14

And it is not a cutter if you supinate to the outside of the ball, it is a misthrown pitch and leads to excessive stress on the elbow and shoulder. A cutter is what I call a “mature” pitch, meaning that it takes a certain amount of strength and manipulation and velocity in order to work (Which is why you usually see it developed along with a real change, late in high school or early college). It is usually overbalancing a fastball grip which gives it the break, a slider has a similar action but using extreme supination though it gets movement is a trip down the wrong path.
The methodology Roger and I refer to is breaking down the actual fundamentals of the throw, breaking it down to the basics means you can rebuild more rapidly to a fundamentally sound mechanic, if the stripe doesn’t work, break it down even more, he’s young enough, have his “warm-up” consist of very fundamental throwing routines and gradually build during the warm up. Repetition will be your and his friend, if you train in a fundamentally sound manner.


#15

May have been said, reading on my phone… think behind the ball not on top of it when it comes to low 3/4.


#16


#17

Thx guys. Appreciate the help