Where do I start

Hi all,
I’m having a hard time analyzing myself in the mirror and knowing exactly what I have to do to fix my mechanics, which quite frankly are a mess. I’ve been watching video of Randy Johnson and reading the never ending pitching articles on the net and I’m having a horrible time implementing everything. My question would be where do I start? What should I start doing to get results?

Lefty, there are some things you can figure out on your own—and there are some things where you really need some help. My advice to you would be to get together with a topflight pitching coach, one who really knows his elbow from third base, and have him work with you. The place to start should be whatever needs work the most.
A point to remember—you need to determine which arm slot is most comfortable for you, and stick with it; don’t let anyone try to change it. I had, way back when, a most incredible pitching coach—an active major league pitcher who doubled as an extra pitching coach for the team—who firmly believed that every pitcher has a natural motion, and what he would do was work with that pitcher to maximize his or her capatilities. I was a natural sidearmer, and so we worked from that vantage point. So if you can find such a coach, stay with him. Best of luck. 8) :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:

Thanks for your input…i’ve contact a few coaches from Tom House’s site who are NPA certified…does that necessarily mean they are qualified? I’ve found one who had more than a one sentence reply who seems to be genuinely interested in this, but want to know what you guys think about the qualifications based on NPA certification and what else I should ask? Thanks again.

fix your footwork first and a lot of times that will fix minor problems with your upper body.

As Zita said a pitching coach would be the best way to find out what you’re doing wrong…also posting a video on this site helps a lot too. In my opinion the first thing to start with would be what YOU think YOU need to work on most…but for somewhat fast results (in terms of velocity) it would be perfecting your armslot and stride (thats what gave me results fairly fast)

Also I don’t know if your implying this but it seems like your looking for somewhat immidiate results…nothing in pitching comes fast…you gotta work at it

[quote=“lankylefty00”]Hi all,
I’m having a hard time analyzing myself in the mirror and knowing exactly what I have to do to fix my mechanics, which quite frankly are a mess. I’ve been watching video of Randy Johnson and reading the never ending pitching articles on the net and I’m having a horrible time implementing everything. My question would be where do I start? What should I start doing to get results?[/quote]

An important thing to do would be to get some video of yourself pitching.
It will make it easier to catch faults in your mechanics when you review video of yourself.
As for watching video of Randy Johnson, just make sure that you are not trying to make your pitching motion exactly the same as his.
Every pitcher has his own special pitching motion. A pitcher should not just copy a major leaguer’s motion because he is a major leaguer.
You should watch Randy Johnson’s video(s) and find what he did that gave him good mechanics and velocity.
Watch video, do not copy pitching motion, but engraft into your own pitching motion what the major leaguer is doing that gives him good velocity and mechanics.

Yup.
Ed Lopat—my wise and wonderful pitching coach—firmly believed that every pitcher has a natural motion. He would work with the pitcher to show him or her how to make the most of it, maximize capabilities, you name it. The day he showed me how to throw the slider he was watching me as I was familiarizing myself with the pitch, and he noted that I was a sidearmer all the way. He put this together with several other observations and formed in his mind a jumping-off point from which he could work with me. And being the pitching coach that he was—in addition to being a key member of the Yankees’ Big Three pitching rotation—he made no attempt to change my motion. He just showed me a couple of things here and there, knowing what would work for me—things like refining the crossfire I had picked up on my own, suggesting a different grip for my circle change that solved a problem I had been having with it, and teaching me a lot of very advanced stuff he felt I needed to know.
And that’s what a good pitching coach should do. So I would say that the poster who doesn’t know where to start should find himself a good pitching coach, a guy who really knows his elbow from third base, and the two of them should work together to determine what’s wrong and how to fix it. 8)

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Yup.
Ed Lopat—my wise and wonderful pitching coach—firmlhy believed that every pitcher has a natural motion. He would work with the pitcher to show him or her how to make the most of it, maximize capabilities, you name it. The day he showed me how to throw the slider he was watching me as I was familiarizing myself with the pitch, and he noted that I was a sidearmer all the way. He put this together with several other observations and formed in his mind a jumping-off point from which he could work with me. And being the pitching coach that he was—in addition to being a key member of the Yankees’ Big THree pitching rotation—he made no attempt to change my motion. He just showed me a couple of things here and there, knowing what would work for me—things like refining the crossfire I had picked up on my own, suggesting a different grip for my circle change that solved a problem I had been having with it, and teaching me a lot of very advanced stuff he felt I needed to know.
And that’s what a good pitching coach should do. So I would say that the poster who doesn’t know where to start should find himself a good pitchning coach, a guy who really knows his elbow from third base, and the two of them should work together to determine what’s wrong and how to fix it. 8)[/quote]

ive found a pitching coach…npa certified…i met with him once and he didn’t charge, and he tried charging 75 per hour and we talked it down to 30 an hour. i sent him an email following up asking what things he wants me to do on my own and he only replied asking for my cell and never called me, although we will be meeting twice a week. he said he also believes in working with the pitchers natural delivery. what things should i look for to figure out if he’s truly worth his salt? i don’t have a lot of time to waste. thanks for all the responses guys.

also he didnt play passed high school ball…he said that was because he broke his ankle…hes coaching high school now and said hes trying to make the jump into college and plans on making his living completely from lessons and coaching.

After a couple of sessions with the coach, you’ll know.
At your first meeting, get a catcher, have him set up behind the plate, and throw for some fifteen minutes, using all your pitches, throwing from the full windup and the stretch, and let the coach observe you carefully—every move you make. Then have a good discussion with him about your strengths and your weaknesses, about what the first thing is that you need to work on, and listen to what he’s telling you. You should be able to determine at that point whether this avenue is worth pursuing.
Here’s a story from the major league archives. Back in 1959 pitcher Jim Brosnan went to the St. Louis Cardinals, and as he tells it in his book “The Long Season” he was having a dialogue with pitching coach Clyde King (himself no slouch), and he was complaining about his two fast balls, the four-seamer and the two-seamer, neither of which was working for him. King promptly called in a catcher and had Brosnan do some throwing for fifteen minutes, using both pitches. Then he told Brosnan to drop the four-seamer, which wasn’t working for him at all, and go with his two-seamer which was working much better for him. So Brosnan took his advice and became a sinker-slider pitcher, and he had great success with this combination over the next several seasons when he went to the Cincinnati Reds and became their de facto closer.
I remember when, in the course of a conversation with Ed Lopat, I happened to mention that I had picked up the crossfire. He said, “Let’s see what you’re doing with it. Just go through the move.” So I did, first from the full windup and then from the stretch, and innediately he noticed that I didn’t have quite the momentum going into it from the stretch the way I was from the full windup. I was flabbergasted—I’d had no idea that this was happening—but he told me, quietly and emphatically, “You’re getting the batters out.” I couldn’t argue with him on that point. Then he suggested something I could work on to get the speed I wanted when pitching from the stretch, a sort of drill I could use and then put aside when I had achieved my objective. Some time later he checked me out on it and was satisfied that I had indeed achieved this.
And Austin, on a earlier post, was right—Rome wasn’t built in a day, and what you’re aiming for can’t be achieved overnight. It takes time, patience and hard work. I wish you luck and hope that this coach is what you’re looking for. 8) :baseballpitcher:

Well, it’s been a couple months and I’ve made some progress. I started out at about 72-73, and now I am at between 75-77. Besides the drills I’ve been doing, and the fact that I haven’t mastered combining them into my mechanics yet, what should I keep doing to keep getting that velocity up? I work out about 3 times a week for 2 hours at the gym, and also do various drills that are listed below as well as a summary (although not 100% complete) of workouts that I am planning from this day on. I am planning on being a bit more active from this point on to keep improving my results. I also weight 170 and am 6’2" so I am wondering if gaining some mass will help my cause as well. Do you guys have any suggestions about working out, nutrition, other drills, how much throwing I should keep doing, etc, just so I can keep making progress? This pitching coach I have is great and I want to maximize my results and see just how far I can push my results.

Sunday-pitch

Monday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes, pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press flat, seated row, hammercurl, tricep extension, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Tuesday-hershiser drill, fence drill, opposite and equal, rocker drill, towel drill, x drill, longtoss

Wednesday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes,pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press incline, seated row, bar curl,seated dip, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Thursday-hershiser drill, fence drill, opposite and equal, rocker drill, towel drill, x drill, longtoss

Friday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes, pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press flat, seated row, hammercurl, tricep extension, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Saturday-See pitching coach/light bullpen

[quote=“lankylefty00”]Well, it’s been a couple months and I’ve made some progress. I started out at about 72-73, and now I am at between 75-77. Besides the drills I’ve been doing, and the fact that I haven’t mastered combining them into my mechanics yet, what should I keep doing to keep getting that velocity up? I work out about 3 times a week for 2 hours at the gym, and also do various drills that are listed below as well as a summary (although not 100% complete) of workouts that I am planning from this day on. I am planning on being a bit more active from this point on to keep improving my results. I also weight 170 and am 6’2" so I am wondering if gaining some mass will help my cause as well. Do you guys have any suggestions about working out, nutrition, other drills, how much throwing I should keep doing, etc, just so I can keep making progress? This pitching coach I have is great and I want to maximize my results and see just how far I can push my results.

Sunday-pitch

Monday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes, pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press flat, seated row, hammercurl, tricep extension, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Tuesday-hershiser drill, fence drill, opposite and equal, rocker drill, towel drill, x drill, longtoss

Wednesday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes,pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press incline, seated row, bar curl,seated dip, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Thursday-hershiser drill, fence drill, opposite and equal, rocker drill, towel drill, x drill, longtoss

Friday-flexibility- static/dynamic stretches, jobes, pushups, planks, prayers, core, squats, squat jumps, dumbbell bench press flat, seated row, hammercurl, tricep extension, shrugs, lunges, sprints

Saturday-See pitching coach/light bullpen[/quote]

Seems like your showing improvement. Thats a good start!