When your stuff isnt working

sometimes when i get on the mound or i jus bullpen.
i feel lik emy breking pitches and other offspeed pitches doesnt work like id like them too.
and i really get frustrated.
what should i do when this happens.
ZITA you know best!

[quote=“king.navarro_34”]sometimes when i get on the mound or i jus bullpen.
i feel lik emy breking pitches and other offspeed pitches doesnt work like id like them too.
and i really get frustrated.
what should i do when this happens.
ZITA you know best![/quote]

When your in the bullpen, ofcourse you have the luxury of taking time and pitches to make adjustments. As a pitcher you have to understand that your A+ stuff isn’t going to show up to the mound everyday. But you also have to understand that you don’t need your best stuff to get hitters out. When you get onto the game mound it’s about competing and trying to put your ballclub in a position to win the game. That means making enough quality pitches to get outs to keep the other team off the scoreboard.

Get out the popcorn it may be time for another Ed Lopat story :smiley:

I agree with Hammer and will add, when it ain’t working, always fall back to basics, don’t TRY too hard, remember the words of the Great Greg…“When things aren’t working for me I take something off of it”. I always try to get my son to step off, rub the ball down, think of the fundemental of the pitch and go back at it.

Thats alright, sometimes your stuff just doesn’t work.
“Anybody can win when they are throwing 98 on the black, but you don’t become a great pitcher until you can win with nothing”

Just remain calm, don’t get frustrated with your stuff, and don’t overthrow. I did that and now I am out for weeks with a sprained pitching elbow

Yes, but, what happens to Mariano Rivera when his cutter isnt working? :lol:

Then he locates a pitch thats 93 and gets three outs.

Haha, that never happens 8)

Some one of you guys requested another Ed Lopat story, and I remember one day we were talking—one of our “curbstone consultations”. I said that I knew he didn’t win all the time, that he lost games now and then, and I wanted to know how he reacted to that. His answer surprised me; he said “You sound like a pitcher who has never lost a game.” I had to admit that this was so. Then he told me, and I remember his exact words:
"I’ve lost some. I guess it depends on the kind of loss. I’ve been belted around, eight-nothing, nine-three, eleven-two—whatever—and even though I don’t like it, it doesn’t upset me all that much because all those scores tell me is that I just didn’t have my good stuff those days. It’s the other defeats that get to me—the close ones, two-one, three-two…After one of those, I’ve been known to sit in the clubhouse and chew myself out for letting the game get away from me. The difference between winning two-one and losing three-two is often one bad pitch, and it’s at times like that I wish I’d just gone fishing. I know I shouldn’t do that, but I can’t help it. I hate to lose. The last time I pitched against Detroit, I lost three-two, and there was no living with me after the game."
I said "Aw-w-w-w…But you won your next time out."
In retrospect: he was telling me, in an indirect way, that no one has his or her best stuff every time out, that you have other pitches you can use when your #1 isn’t there on a particular day. That was good to know, because sometimes I would have trouble with my curve ball, so I would just leave it alone for the time being and go to something like the knuckle-curve. It helps when you’re a snake-jazzer with lots of breaking stuff. And many times the problem will simply resolve itself.
8)