When to stop at a certain weight

We are playing baseball here, which does require you to be strong, but when does strength become too much.

My question: Should i keep lifting heavier and heavier for my squats and deadlifts.

I know i should probaly put another 50lbs on each. But after that should i stop and just work on reps. The weight is getting extremely high, and i don’t want to risk future potential injury or career ending injurys.

Squat: 350lbs for 8 reps
Deadlift: 400lbs for 5 reps
Bench press: 220lbs for 5 reps

Now i can see getting to 400lbs on my squats and 450lbs for my deadlifts.

But after that it just seems like a waste. I don’t want to get injuried from lifting these heavy weights. And i am sure that majority of major league baseball players don’t go any higher on their squats then around 500lbs

i know roger clemens was lifting i think 500lbs but he was juicing.
So ya should i stop on the weight, but increase the reps.

This is actually a pretty good point.

I’d argue that when your bodyweight is where it should be (which is usually a lot higher than most people are willing to admit) and gains in raw strength are starting to require more complex periodization to improve them, that you should just be happy maintaining the levels of absolute strength you have and spend training economy on other things - like reactive strength/speed (broad jumping, vertical leap, power clean/high pull, etc).

I have been thinking about this concept a lot lately and I don’t have concrete arguments, but my theory above outlines it pretty well.

Kyleb makes a good point…

Once you feel like your strength is good (don’t know your specifics), you would be well served by shifting your focus into power and speed/strength elements as Kyleb has pointed out.

To take it even further, I would suggest focusing on imbalances (we all have them) with mobility/flexibility work to ensure that you stay injury free and are able to use your strength for baseball.

Re 500 LB squats: I think you would be hard-pressed to find ANY MLB player who could properly squat (full range) that weight or would even want to… but thats another story.

Hope that helps…

I agree with Kyle. Increasing weights can increase risk with very small benefit. I keep thinking of Bert Contraris(sp?), not a baseball player but a personal trainer who was pushing for 600 lb deadlift when he avulsed his bicep tendon and required surgery.

Once you hit strength goal, think pylometrics and thing like speed deadlifts and speed squats.

I agree with Kyleb here…I think pitchers should aim to be as big and strong as they are capable of while still maintaining exceptional flexibility and mobility. At some point, you will have advanced strength levels and begin to plateau…the emphasis should certainly shift towards strength maintenance at this point. There is a point of diminishing returns with regards to strength training…you get a ton of bang for your buck going from beginner to intermediate strength levels, a little less going from intermediate to advanced, and relatively little benefit as a pitcher to go from advanced to elite. Once you squat 450lbs, is squatting 550lbs really going to be worth the injury risk? Once you can do pullups for reps with 100lbs added do you really need to keep pushing the envelope as long as your baseball career is still alive?

People will disagree on where these limits lie…I personally think most college players will not come close to reaching this point before their junior or senior years, and some players never reach this point. To address the original poster, I think you are pretty close to that point where the emphasis shifts on the strength-speed continuum.

More strength speed and speed strength work, more plyos.

Also more mobility and soft tissue work. You can still lift heavy but it should not be the emphasis.

Ya this is exactly what i was thinking as well. Like whats the point of trying to put up 550lbs on your squat when you could do 450lbs and still that is a big lift.

What do you guys think about say stopping at a 450lb squat but increasing the reps. What do you guys think?

Also if i am squating 350lbs for 8 reps do you guys think i should keep the reps like this and increase the weight or start pyramiding now and get my reps lower and increase the weight:

Example of pyramid set:

225lbs(12reps)
275lbs(10reps)
350lbs(8reps)
375lbs(5reps)
400lbs(3 reps)
425lbs(1 rep)

What would you guys think about this pyramiding set. i really want to hit 400lbs at least a couple of times. I know its possible since i can squat 350lbs already for 8 reps. But ya should i try this out.

Sorry if the post went sideways lol

[quote=“BarryBonds999”]Ya this is exactly what i was thinking as well. Like whats the point of trying to put up 550lbs on your squat when you could do 450lbs and still that is a big lift.

What do you guys think about say stopping at a 450lb squat but increasing the reps. What do you guys think?

Also if i am squating 350lbs for 8 reps do you guys think i should keep the reps like this and increase the weight or start pyramiding now and get my reps lower and increase the weight:

Example of pyramid set:

225lbs(12reps)
275lbs(10reps)
350lbs(8reps)
375lbs(5reps)
400lbs(3 reps)
425lbs(1 rep)

What would you guys think about this pyramiding set. i really want to hit 400lbs at least a couple of times. I know its possible since i can squat 350lbs already for 8 reps. But ya should i try this out.

Sorry if the post went sideways lol[/quote]

First of all, I don’t think this post went sideways. I think this is a very interesting discussion and thank you for bringing it up in a very clear manner.

Pick a target one-rep max (1RM) you want to hit. Warm up with just the bar, then maybe try this progression:

5x135
3x225
2x315
1x365
1x385
1x400
1x405

Be sure to take 3-5 minutes of rest between 1RM attempts.

What I generally recommend is to do 3 sets of 3 reps at 90% of your 1RM to maintain strength, twice per week. As an example, when I was squatting 455, I was squatting 3x3x405 twice per week to maintain that strength level.

Deadlifts are a different story; I did those once per week at 2x3x90% to maintain strength. Squat strength preserves pulling strength, generally, so you don’t need to do as much.

thanks kyleb.

Did you follow a certain strength program or just made your own up, with the most basic compound movements? Would be interesting to see your full routine, i would like to hit a squat of 450lbs before i am 19, just turned 18,btw.