When to know when to quit the game I love?

It’s crossed my mind multiple times this season, how do I know if it’s the right move??

i dont think there is a right time to quit…

i played my whole life, then i stopped playing about 5 years ago… couldnt find the time anymore

now everytime that i go to a game, i really really want to play again.

i found the NABA, they have leages 18+, 25+, 35+, 45+, 55+, and other divisions

they have leagues in 80+ cities, if not near you, you can even start your own.

it will cost a couple hundred bucks a season, but i miss the game so much, im def. gonna pay it.

in my oppinion, there is never a right time to quit while u still have love for the game

http://www.dugout.org/

There are two types of baseball – recreational and competitive.

Recreational is like a pick up league. Anybody can play pickup. But then your question doesn’t seem to come from just anybody. You impress me as baseball people. Those folks that are kinda corky.

For us, competitive baseball is the only game in town – period. And since winning is thee game, when you can’t carry your load, when you can’t hold your own, when your teammates can’t depend on you to do your job, it’s time to move on.

Love the game that much? Then do justice to the guys that are out there in the hot sun.

Coach, manage, organize, keep score, shag balls, …. anything, just stay with the game.

So, when is it time to hang up the glove? You’ll know. You’ll know deep inside when the game deserves the truth more than you do. It’s that, that separates us baseball people from the fans that just watch us. We care about the game. We care about those fielding regardless what side of the baseline they’re on. We simply care.

Coach B.

Perhaps one of the greatest gifts my dad left me was his advise when it came to making difficult decisions.

One of them was, “Go look in the mirror.” At first it seemed to be a suggestion that held little promise. What could looking at my ugly mug do to help in this decision. Until I realized it had a deeper meaning. When you look in the mirror you are forced to look at reality. When you look in the mirror at your true inner convictions, you have all the input needed to make a decision.

The other advise was, “Don’t look back.”

This week is our last week of the regular season before playoffs, we play a pretty bad team on Wednesday. If the coaches don’t give me a chance to figure out all of the in game problems I’ve been having this season on Wednesday, or any other of our four games this week, I have a decision of trying to figure it out again in summer Legion ball (same level as varsity), or hanging it up.

I’m 17 and am a junior in high school. I first started playing organized baseball in elementary school, then made one of the biggest mistakes in my life and chose not to play at all in middle school. My 9th grade year after countless hours of practicing pitching against a piece of chain link fence, I tried out for our JV team and made it. After two years of JV I look back and see a good amount of progress in myself. Although, towards the end of my second year of JV I hit a wall. It’s continued into this year on varsity. My coaches seem to have no faith in me and are the type of coaches that won’t put you in again for the rest of the season if you have one really bad outing and aren’t athletic gods like a few other pitchers on my team that get second chances after getting lit up (they also think that the whole team can pitch too). One is a son of a former pro athlete and the others dad puts so much pressure on him that the coaches seem forced to keep putting him in. Even though his ERA is at like 9 for the season. It drives me insane.

With coaches like that, it just makes baseball not fun for me anymore. I don’t know what to do.

Baseball is desire…
This is the second time I’ve posted this speech…it’s a good speech…means something…listen to it. You too…Too Much…

If the game doesn’t move you to believe…then look elsewhere. If you can believe…it will be forever worth it.

Near the end of his career Joe DiMaggio was asked once how he knew when it was time to quit. His answer: “A ball is hit to me in the outfield. My brain tells me bend over, scoop it up, fire it into the infield. And my body says ‘Who, me?’” And he knew. He announced that he was packing it in at the end of the 1951 World Series; he said he just couldn’t hack it any more, that the game was no longer fun for him, and thus he had played his last game of ball. He knew. And if that time comes for you, you will know too.
Ed Lopat retired at the end of the 1955 season, but he managed and coached and worked as a scout—he never left the game because he loved it so, even in the face of the illness which would ultimately claim him. And if you want to stay in the game, in whatever capacity, you’ll know that too. So in the long run, it’s up to you. 8)

Tim Wakefield was about completely washed up as a postion player and told by a scout he would never make it out of AA in 1988, and the team was going to release him. A coach had watched him play catch with other guys experimenting with his knuckler (which was nasty).They gave him two weeks to get some control of it.

It is now 2009 and Wakefield continues to pitch his flutterball and may eventually make the hall of fame. Its not over, until you hang them up.

Ian

lol sounds like me, im 24 now and started playing again after i turned 20. i played little league and stuff but i went to gardens high(where there are alot of good pitchers) i couldnt make any team jv, v, freshman, so i quit playin. my friend got drafted by the redsox and then it got me playin baseball again just randomly one day because i missed it.

Started getting balls and just throwing them by myself against backstops and just started teaching myself to pitch. i found naba about a year after i started, and when i joined i was ok(throwing about 80-81). now im at 88-90 and trying to find a local comunity college and maybe get a scholorship to a d2 school since im older.

Point is if you love it then dont stop because its more about what you do rather than what coaches wont let you do. if you want it enough you will get better. i really believe theres no such thing as being predisposed to having a 90+ fastball. theres always somewhere to play baseball if you dont like where your at

So the beginning of the day started off bad. Found out the guy with the ERA of like 9.00 was pitching against the bad team on wednesday. BUT after our game today, my coach took me and our catcher (also a pitcher too) to work on our mechanics. I threw for about a half an hour off of the mound and half of that half an hour was spent working on my arm action and lower body. Basically…he taught me how to throw all over again. It totally absolutely 100% made sense, everything he told me I was doing wrong. I will be working on this day in and day out, I really think it will both add velocity and command. This could not of helped my confidence anymore.

:bigtup:
Sometimes you just have one of those days…I tip my cap to your coach…it sounds like he’s a decent fella

[quote=“ian demagi”]Tim Wakefield was about completely washed up as a postion player and told by a scout he would never make it out of AA in 1988, and the team was going to release him. A coach had watched him play catch with other guys experimenting with his knuckler (which was nasty).They gave him two weeks to get some control of it.

It is now 2009 and Wakefield continues to pitch his flutterball and may eventually make the hall of fame. Its not over, until you hang them up.

Ian[/quote]

Great example.

Sometimes you just have one of those days…I tip my cap to your coach…it sounds like he’s a decent fella[/quote]

Maybe he’s reading this forum as well :wink:

How bogus is this? So last Thursday, my coach tells me I get the start against an absolute TERRIBLE team. I’m pumped, I’ve been waiting for so long. Then the day before the game that I’m supposed to start, we had another game. I hear my coach tell our normal catcher that he might start the game that I’m supposed to. I’m so pissed off I can’t even say anything. Then come game day, I prepare like I’m going to start. Then the coaches give the game ball to the other guy. On top of all of it, I don’t even get mentioned in relief.

I’m about 70% sure that I’m done with baseball after this varsity season. Then I’m debating on working my you know what off for my last year and a half in high school, to go and try out for the CC that I’m planning to go to (that has a very good baseball program) and plays our local CC team quite a bit. Just to show the coaches what they missed out on and everything that I know I can do that they never gave me a new chance to show.

Good or bad idea?