When (if ever) should a kid be taught to bat left handed?


#21

If the kid doesnt have a preferred batters stance yet. You should always try to have left handed kids bat righty & right handed kids bat lefty. Im not saying to try & have young kids bat from both sides of the plate. But, from the left side of the plate… the bottom hand (power hand in their swing) will be the right hand. & vice versa for natural lefties. Best to start them like that from day one.


#22

I think it’s a huge advantage to be able to bat left handed, either exclusively or as a switch hitter. As a RHH, I find it easier to hit off left handed pitching. I’m sure most LHH prefer to see RHPs, regardless of their stats against both.

I did not start switch hitting until I was 10-11 years old. I was very good at wiffle ball and the kids made me hit lefty to make it more fair. For whatever reason, I could always rake wiffle balls. One day, I walked up to the plate in Little League BP. My coach chastised me and told me to get in the proper box. I told him I would if I didn’t hit the ball, so he threw me a few and I made good contact. I always practiced both ways until I stopped playing wiffle ball. Then I was almost exclusively a RHH again. The only time I’d hit from the left side beyond Senior Little League was when I 100% needed to get the ball on the right side. I’ve recently started batting lefty again, but only to demonstrate to a young LHH how to swing the bat properly. It always helps your credibility with a lefty if you can first show you can hit the ball left handed.


#23

Absolutely they don’t know how to bat either way when they start. CHILDREN are smarter than most people give them credit for. I taught my self to bat lefty at about 8 and at 65 years old I can still hit with more power left a bit more control right. Its a game have fun(although I had taught my child lefty for years and she never used it in a game) teach but do not try to control or force it their game let them decide


#24

Why would hitting from the left side create a naturally longer swing and give them “two good hands on the bat”? Are you referring to a right handed player who naturally bats left (like my son). He also plays golf left and already very good for his age. He throws, writes, and does almost everything righty but has had a bat or club in his hand since he could walk and always swung from the left side. I think it provides a huge advantage in golf because the dominant arm is leading the pull of the club and helps control the face. Point being, I asked him if he wanted to try switch hitting after baseball practice and he swings just as well from the right side. Guess my question is, should I turn him into a switch hitter or does the advantage of batting lefty outweigh the time spent splitting the two?


#25

If you are a pitcher and you take your turn at bat, it’s probably a consideration to avoid switch hitting and exposure of your pitching arm to damage. Today, people wear so many pads and protectors, it may not be a major concern, but it’s something to consider.


#26

I believe CoachPaul is referring to getting hit by a pitch in your throwing arm/hand when hitting opposite. When you hit same-handed, your throwing arm is your back arm when you’re in your batting stance. But when you hit opposite-handed, your throwing arm becomes your front arm so it is more exposed.

But there is another way a pitcher’s throwing arm can get damaged when hitting opposite. Hitting is a joint loosening activity for the front shoulder. After the bat passes through the contact zone, it wraps around behind you during the follow-through which opens up the front side of the front shoulder and, over time, can loosen the shoulder joint. This may not be a problem for pitchers who bat same-handed because it is their glove side shoulder that is getting loosened. But, for pitchers who bat opposite-handed, this can be problematic because, obviously, it is their throwing shoulder that is getting loosened - especially for those who release the top hand from the bat during follow-through. Unfortunately, the problem might not show up until years down the road.