Whats the best training


#1

what is the best workout/training to not necessarily be a better pitcher, but just to get into good shape for pitching. i work 5 days a week, so i dont get much time to do much excercising, except for what i do at work (running around, etc.) what should i work on to be a good pitcher (running, weights, etc.)


#2

run run run run run, and do a lot of cardio, yoga or somethin like that is great, i do that and lift weights and run 3 miles a day, hey look at me for proof, 16 years old and i throw 88 mph on average, just work hard man, the more u put in the more u get out of it


#3

Cardio isn’t going to help you much with your pitching, especially at this time of year. You never use your aerobic system when you pitch so conditioning it doesn’t make a lot of sense. You can possibly make the argument that its good to run long distance the day after you pitch but now is not the time to do long distance running. Right now your focus should be on strength and power. As the offseason progresses you will want to shift the focus to more baseball specific activities but now the focus should be on strength and power.


#4

what does cardio do?? it strengthens ur legs mainly, and u need legs that have good endurance, trust me guys, this is a workout my dad did in the minors, HE PLAYED MLB BALL, so i think he knows a little about workout programs


#5

Not picking sides, just saying, Tanner take a look at Mr. Griffin’s resume it’s pretty good. (I don’t wanna start an argument, greatest thing about this forum is there usually aren’t any arguments, just good information and backed up opinions)

* Strength and conditioning coach for the KC Royals organization
* Strength and conditioning coach for the Univ. of Nebraska baseball and football teams
* 3 years college pitcher
* Coached 4 first round draft picks from the 2004 and 2005 drafts

My thought’s: theres times for certain training, and the offseason you can do more strength and power, because you don’t have to go out and pitch in games.

I understand where Tanners coming from but I think one’s offseason would be more productive spent training power and strenght (especially since he said his time was limited)


#6

thanks for the help guys, so basically left weights and stuff? i know not too much, dont wanna be too bulky to pitch. is there like a certain weight you should go up to so as not to be too bulky, but still get some strength and power?


#7

[quote=“centerfield2150”]Not picking sides, just saying, Tanner take a look at Mr. Griffin’s resume it’s pretty good. (I don’t wanna start an argument, greatest thing about this forum is there usually aren’t any arguments, just good information and backed up opinions)

* Strength and conditioning coach for the KC Royals organization
* Strength and conditioning coach for the Univ. of Nebraska baseball and football teams
* 3 years college pitcher
* Coached 4 first round draft picks from the 2004 and 2005 drafts

My thought’s: theres times for certain training, and the offseason you can do more strength and power, because you don’t have to go out and pitch in games.

I understand where Tanners coming from but I think one’s offseason would be more productive spent training power and strenght (especially since he said his time was limited)[/quote]
i dk, so far in my life, last offseason i used that approach of lotz of running and weights and i gained 10 mph on my fastball and am one of the most highly scouted players in nd
, but i get where hes comin from too, jus diff. kinds of offseasons


#8

he makes good points too and i am not disagreein with what he said, its just that i used what i said and it worked, idk, his approach oviosly works too


#9

The thing that is sometimes misunderstood about long distance running is that it builds strength. If you want to look at the extremes of running, consider an olympic sprinter and a marathon runner. Which has stronger legs? Long distance running has actually been shown to reduce your power. If you are in your teens or maybe even early 20’s, your natural growth might “outgrow” the negative impact on your power so you won’t see a decrease in power but you won’t see as much improvement as someone who is running sprints and doing plyometric type exercises.

The aerobic energy system doesn’t provide much power. It is capable of providing a little bit of power for a long time period. Pitchers perform an explosive action for maybe one second, then rest at least 12 seconds. Steve might know more about the actual rest time between pitches but I think 12 seconds sounds reasonable. If a pitcher is throwing a pitch every 12 seconds then he is doing awesome. That means no hits, no walks, no foul balls. All of those add even extra rest time. And if he is throwing a pitch every 12 seconds then he probably isn’t throwing more than 12 pitches as inning before he rests for several minutes. This doesn’t require the aerobic energy system.

Some people will argue that pitchers should run long distance the day after they pitch. I personally wouldn’t have a pitcher do it but I wouldn’t argue as much in that situation.

Many older ballplayers did do a lot of long distance running. Many of those old players are now coaches and they teach what they were taught. There is an increasing amount of research available now if you want to do your homework on it.

Ultimately its your baseball career. Do your homework and decide what you think is best. I’m just a resource available to you. Good luck.


#10

A lot depends on how the distance is run. Interval training can provide aerobic conditioning while building leg strength. Running middle distances can have a positive impact. For example a runner who can run a 4 minute mile is running at about the same pace as a 8 second 60 yard dash. It would be interesting to see what type of 60 yard dash times elite milers could post.

One approach is to begin with some “distance” running to develop an aerobic base and then to switch over primarily to sprints and interval work.


#11

check out theathleticpitcher.com. if you are interested i may sell my copy,its for more seious older players.


#12

How you do your running can affect things but intervals will never be as intense as just sprints. They may be hard but I want you to understand what I mean by intense. Intensity refers to how close you are to your maximum. A marathon would be very hard to complete but the intensity is not high because your marathon speed wouldn’t be close to your sprint speed. This is similar with weight lifting. Intensity refers to a percentage of your one rep max. Doing a lighter weight more times means it isn’t as intense, even if it is very hard to complete the reps.

Aerobic base is a term used a lot but I don’t think it is very accurate. If you never use the aerobic system, that base wouldn’t affect anything. Its almost like building a foundation for a house. Then building the house 100 feet away from the foundation. The foundation could be great but it isn’t used. To use your aerobic system you would need to be moving for at least 2 minutes nonstop. That never ever happens in baseball. The ATP-PC, and glycolysis energy systems are used but even the glycolysis energy system isn’t used as much as the ATP-PC system.

I don’t want to get into an extended argument on the message boards but if you want to discuss it, send me a private message.

Mike Griffin


#13

Mike:

I believe I understand and agree with what you are saying. I do wonder though if we should be considering the work interval for a pitcher as an inning, rather then a pitch? Consider what the workout would be to simulated a series of innings. Short sprint or explosive movement followed by an active rest interval repeated in sets of 12-15? The LA-O2 system might be of greater importance in recovering and reloading between pitches.

In any case, I appreciate you providing such solid advice in this forum. We’re all fortunate to have someone like you available to demystify training and conditioning for our pitchers, thanks.


#14

When I refer to establishing an aerobic base I simply mean getting in good enough shape to do enough sprint work without running out of gas. It is possible to get there through sprints alone but IMO a bit quicker to get there through aerobic conditioning. After that there’s no real need for aerobic conditioning as doing enough sprint work will provide aerobic conditioning unless the interval between sprints is too long. We built my son up to 2 miles before we started working the sprints. Now he’s focusing on sprinting and doesn’t do any distance running unless told to do so by the HS coach, in which case he says “Yes sir.” and does what he’s told.

When I was still playing competitive tennis I got talked into running for an hour for a charity event. I hadn’t been doing any distance running but the conditioning from the tennis (talk about short sprints) was plenty enough to get me through it.

The point I was making about middle distance running was that it is intense enough that one is not going to “lose” fast twitch fibers by running middle distance or intervals at full effort. Obviously the intensity isn’t the same as sprinting so I won’t claim that it will provide the same strength benefit.