What ya'll think about slinging?

Hi guys just have a quick question that i’d like to see some discussion on.

What do ya’ll think about pitchers who sling? I sling, and my pitching coach wants me to change it. I’ve pitched like this all my life, and will admit that i could use some tweaking, but not a full change.

So, what ya’ll think? Is slinging bad? Does it really make your arm late?

Like i said, i want this thread to be a discussion covering everyone’s opinion on it.

p.s. there’s only one slinger in MLB that i can think of.

-Billy

I’ve seen it done. Most of the pitchers who “sling” the ball seem to be lefthanded sidearmers who throw with the long-arm motion, and it can be effective although it tends to look a bit awkward. They are, however, at a disadvantage because they throw with just the arm and shoulder rather than get their entire bodies into the action, and not only does this look awkward but it also could lead to arm and shoulder injuries. Righthanders usually favor the short-arm version of the delivery, which can be more effective with less risk. I used to use both, but early on I had learned to use my legs, hips and torso to get the power behind my pitches, the way I had seen the Yanks’ Big Three guys do ages ago, and so my arm and shoulder would just go along for the ride, so to speak. It took a lot of pressure off, and I never had a sore arm or sore anything else.
To sling or not to sling? It’s a matter of personal preference, but I believe that those pitchers (remember, I said most of them were left-handers) are shortchanging themselves and not making the most of what they have and can do. And it’s obvious that many of them never heard of the crossfire! A sidearmer who can use it can get the same effect as slinging but without the risk. 8)

Very few coaches that I’ve know over the years have much experience with the technique, the adjustment process to bring a pitcher back into form ( if I can call it that), and a host of other issues orbiting the style.

Why?

Well first of all it’s not thee style used by the majority of the arms out there and therefore the experience with trainers and coaches alike is going to reflect the experience ratio. Coaches who are not familiar with anything that impacts their status, job security, and to a certain degree … their pecking order among their peers, can be very reluctant to venture into uncharted waters.

I’ve had very little experience “bringing along” pitchers with this style, not to mention a very uneasy feeling when I’m asked …" coach, can you help me with this?" … or even worse … when directed to …“work with that guy”. First off, because of my lack of professional “whatever”, the last thing that I want to do is to suggest something that’ll hurt the guy now or down the road. Then there’s the proverbial " Sword of Damocles" … hanging over my head IF something goes wrong down the road … and all I’ll hear is … “ok coach, you were the last one with-em, what happen?”

Coach B.

[quote]What do ya’ll think about pitchers who sling? I sling, and my pitching coach wants me to change it. I’ve pitched like this all my life, and will admit that i could use some tweaking, but not a full change.

So, what ya’ll think? Is slinging bad? Does it really make your arm late?

Like i said, i want this thread to be a discussion covering everyone’s opinion on it. [/quote]

It isn’t bad. Just different. It depends on how you sling (or how your arm action works) that will make it “bad” (I prefer to call arm action efficient or not efficient, but that’s just me).

If your arm is late it isn’t because of the arm action you’re using, it’s the timing of it all.

You’d need to put up a clip to see if it needs tweaking or not.

Most good coaches won’t do anything to your mechanics if you mowing people down. They usually feel the need to make a change if you are struggling in some aspect of your game.

Not sure who you’re thinking of, but Roy Oswalt and Justin Verlander are a couple of pitchers who I would catagorize as “slinger” type arm actions.

… I think they do pretty well. 8)

i’m not sure what you are describing as a slinger. the best example i can think of for someone i consider a slinger is walter johnson the big train. he could sling it pretty good

What is slinging?

I know this is a bit off the mark with this topic - but, read up on Walter Johnson. A true gentleman of the game. The true picture on and off the field of what a Major Leaguer is all about.

Want a role model guys … Walter Johnson … can’t get any better.

Coach B.

I think Brian Fuentes may be a slinger. Is that who you’re thinking of?

Brian Fuentes or Justin Masterson. One righty, one lefty, one closer, one setup guy.

What is a slinger

Search Brian Fuentes on google. Watch him pitch. Look at his arm action, particularly near release. The ball appears to be rolling out of the sleeve of his jersey. Very deceptive.

Exactly, but i think Roy Oswalt would be a better example.

[quote=“Zita Carno”]I’ve seen it done. Most of the pitchers who “sling” the ball seem to be lefthanded sidearmers who throw with the long-arm motion, and it can be effective although it tends to look a bit awkward. They are, however, at a disadvantage because they throw with just the arm and shoulder rather than get their entire bodies into the action, and not only does this look awkward but it also could lead to arm and shoulder injuries. Righthanders usually favor the short-arm version of the delivery, which can be more effective with less risk. I used to use both, but early on I had learned to use my legs, hips and torso to get the power behind my pitches, the way I had seen the Yanks’ Big Three guys do ages ago, and so my arm and shoulder would just go along for the ride, so to speak. It took a lot of pressure off, and I never had a sore arm or sore anything else.
To sling or not to sling? It’s a matter of personal preference, but I believe that those pitchers (remember, I said most of them were left-handers) are shortchanging themselves and not making the most of what they have and can do. And it’s obvious that many of them never heard of the crossfire! A sidearmer who can use it can get the same effect as slinging but without the risk. 8)[/quote]

Zita, i understand the risk of injury when only using the arm, but can’t slingers use their hips and legs too? I guess what i’m asking is what causes a slinger to use only his arm? Could this be due to a timing problem that slinging causes? Is it fixable? (I note that most of the time when slingers have timing problems, it’s that their arm is late, which is something that kind of “makes” a slinger so to speak)

There are lot’s of “slingers” in MLB (and college ball).

The idea that that type of arm action is any more “risky” than any other is ridiculous.

its like inverted L and all these stuff but if it doesnt create a timing problem then it should be alright.

If you are defining a slinging arm action as one in which the ball is basically taken out of the glove, brought into the high cocked position then, and then load there scaps yes there are plenty. Some throw pretty hard as well. Fuentes is an example (I think he throws 88-92, but still as a lefty sidearm thats pretty impressive), Derek Holland is another (Can hit 97), Freddy Garcia is also one.

Scott Feldman is another example of a slinger. Roy Oswalt and Justin Verlander don’t sling the ball, they whip it.