What would you reccomend to get my velocity up?!

Okay so im 17 years old 6 foot 6 and 215 lbs. I train daily and have a pitchers body. And for some reason Im only throwing 81 or 82 mph. My stride is good and long its about 6 and a half feet. Sometimes It gets even longer than that. However What are some drills I can do to get my pitch speed up. and any suggestions on anything else would be appreciated?

Post a video of full-speed pitching off a mound from behind your back and from the side. Drills are used to correct specific flaws in your mechanics, but we need to know what flaws you may have first.

Get some video up.

What are your instructors doing with you currently to help increase your velocity?

What are they saying you need to do to increase your velocity?

What have the scouts said to you at the games you’ve pitched in?

Ya im working on the video thing, Trying to get a camera lined up…

And the coaches say I need to quicken my arm by using the towel drill, And unlike in canada and the US the system works a little differently here. The scouts look at people who are ready to sign and they only look at the best of the best. I’ve heard of people who have been signed for multimillion dollar contracts down here. Once Im ready to be looked at than the coaches call the scouts and get them to come to the stadium and have a look.

They’ve told me that a scout was showing interest in me when he came to watch another guy, but I dont know the specifics

Also doing alot of long toss, and as you know, ive started going to the gym frequently so im hoping to see some improvment

In a study where they did videos to look at what leads to velocity of a pitcher these are some of the findings.

  1. External rotation is very important in developing velocity.
  2. Pitchers who pushed off the rubber late tended to throw the hardest, and pushing off the ribber in general was highly correlated with throwing velocity.
  3. Using the rectus abdominus late in the delivery significantly to ball speed.
  4. “A reduction in the amount of x-axis movement was strongly associated with an increase in fastball velocity.”

There you have it. Develop excellent external rotation, work on mechanics, and do your sit ups. These are good starting activities.

[quote=“nick nickason”]In a study where they did videos to look at what leads to velocity of a pitcher these are some of the findings.

  1. External rotation is very important in developing velocity.
  2. Pitchers who pushed off the rubber late tended to throw the hardest, and pushing off the ribber in general was highly correlated with throwing velocity.
  3. Using the rectus abdominus late in the delivery significantly to ball speed.
  4. “A reduction in the amount of x-axis movement was strongly associated with an increase in fastball velocity.”

There you have it. Develop excellent external rotation, work on mechanics, and do your sit ups. These are good starting activities.[/quote]

I’m not sure if this really helps. If you could provide a link to the study or an abstract, it might help. But as is, how did they determine if a pitcher “pushed off the rubber”? What x-axis movement are they talking about? Any horizontal movement? With what body part(s)? How did they conduct the study? Who oversaw the study?

Secondly, you didn’t post ways to improve, just what to improve. I’m guessing he wants specific ways (drills, exercises, etc) to improve. A video of his mechanics is probably necessary for the results in this topic that he is looking for.

Sit-ups don’t develop rectus abdominus strength. They primarily work the psoas and hip flexors, and any “ab” work they give is endurance-related and not strength related. Sit-ups also work the abs in a different manner than rotational work does; they exist in two separate movement planes.

BenFA

The"study was really a review article of various studies looking at ball velocity. It was entitled “Baseball Throwing mechanics as they relate to pathology and performance - A review.” It appeared in the 2007 issue of the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 6,1-20,http//www.jssm.org. It was authored by Rod White3ley from the University of Sidney, Australia. Many of your questions I cannot answer. One has to trust the author to have reviewed the accuracy of the studies before he quoted them in a professional journal. The purpose of my response to Blakey was to tell him what others found are key areas to work on to improve ball velocity. ( Blakey is going to the gym and probably already doing exercise to improve some of the points I listed.) The points I listed are the results the investigators found. If they make sense, one can work on them. Or, one can reject them.

As far as the x-axis issue, I take it to mean that, as one delivers the ball, staying on the x-axis o f the body is most effective for developing ball velocity. Any movement to the y-axis (horizontal)is detrimental for ball velocity.

BenFA

I went back and looked up the article, and this will probably answer the x-axis mix up. “These findings concur with the observations of Feltner(1989)
who suggested that the rotation around a relatively stationary non throwing shoulder would give rise to higher trunk rotation torques and therefore higher throwing velocity.”

Sorry for the confusion.

Nick

Kyle, what types of exercises would you suggest to strengthen the rectus abdominus muscles? Just curious.

Nick, Could you explain what the whole x-axis and y-axis is in terms of pitching? Does that mean I should keep my body back as long as I can? I’ve never really been taught about the scientifics of pitching so if you could explain what that means Id really appreciate it!

And yes, kyle any drills that you have or exercises for rotating the core or the reticus abdomis (What is that?) would be really really helpful!

Blakey

In math, where two lines intersect, the x-axis is the horizontal line and the y-axis is the vertical line. But forget all that!! Just remember to “rotate around a relatively stationary shoulder from stride foot contact to ball release.” Don’t let your shoulder drift too much. Also professional pitchers were found to begin their trunk rotation significantly later in the pitch cycle.

You can use dry drills to work on the above. Work on your proper delivery all the time, from the windup and stretch, it will pay off.

Alright thanks alot for explaining! ill make sure I practice that!

Post some clips!

That’s the best way to get meaningful advice. You want to work smart not just hard. Doing sit ups all day won’t help you that much.

Out of curiousity how strong are you? Pure strength doesn’t equate to veloicty but it helps.

What do you squat? dead lift? clean? shoulder press? what’s your vertical leap? how far can you broad jump?

Looking to help you bud.

Oldman

Behind it all is physics. The science of motion around given shapes. Most of which said above and before is true, though its building the right strengths.

  1. Legs - Enough cannot be said about the roots of a tree. The stronger, the more stable and efficient. Energy spent by the legs each pitch accumulates to near half. Make sure they can last a storm.

  2. Core - Roots are where a tree starts but the trunk keeps it growing. Rotation comes primarily from the torso each throw. Has there ever been a game when you throw the ball without rotating your torso? Exactly.

and finally…

  1. Limb - The Wing. The Thunderbolt. The Nuke LaLoosh
    Keeping this one branch active, most importantly, before but also during the season, is what really helps. I have had a labrum tendon surgery but also, rehabbed my torn labrum prior to surgery, and discovered that true answer was and is, long toss. Throwing by itself keeps the arm in shape but gradually pushing the limits towards the end of each throwing session builds newer, stronger, “small twitch muscle fibers” allowing for increase in overall arm velocity and shoulder strength.

Rotation through the legs, to the hips, to the torso, to the chest/back, to the shoulder, to the arm adds up to SOME algorithm.

Mechanics next…

Haha, the recuts abdominis is just your abs. But I’m curious as to how Kyle suggests you train them.

how to train any body part.

I think Mr Marichal24 meant to say “fast twitch” fibers and not “small twitch”.

I think our advice at this point should have triggered more questions than it answered and my advice is to seek out some really good advice.

Oldman

The best way to train the “core” is to use specific sport-agnostic training methods like side medicine ball tosses and Pallof presses, depending on what you’re trying to improve.

Barbell/Ab Wheel rollouts are fine too for core stability.

But generally the idea of “core training” is a bunch of crap. Deadlifts and squats work the core better than anything else.

Old man, Ill measure the jumping measurements tomorrow and let you know! Also in terms of how much I squat , I can fairly easily do about 250-300 with 12-15 reps. But Im renewing my gym membership friday (Havnt had the money to renew it all this week) So friday Ill measure how much weight I squat and the other things too, P.s I dont do dead lifts or cleans (never had anyone teach me those exercises before so Id rather not do them at all than risk injury by doing them incorrectly)

And Marichal24, That was a great analogy! I really appreciate it!

kyle b- Also Would the woodchopper exercise be a good one for core working?!