What rule of conventional mechanics still works today?

Conventional Pitching Mechanics has been under attack sense the beginning of digital science. With affordable high speed cameras and 3D motion capture, the digital eye has been disapproving conventional wisdom for the past decade or more. A good example would be the old saying, “Thumb to thigh, ball to sky.” This conventional coaching tip has been proven to cause injury with some pitchers because it forces the throwing shoulder to break the “Acromial Plane,” which can cause an impingement of the rotator cuff.

My question is what conventional coaching tips for pitching still prove successful today?

What is that bit of conventional wisdom supposed to mean?

[quote=“■■■■■■■■■■■.net”]This conventional coaching tip has been proven to cause injury with some pitchers because it forces the throwing shoulder to break the “Acromial Plane,” which can cause an impingement of the rotator cuff.[/quote]How can the shoulder break the acromial plane? The acromion is part of the scapula and, as such, moves with the shoulder. Also, where is this proof?

I appreciate the response.

“Conventional Wisdom” of pitching is coaching styles that have been used for decades past. The NPA has broken a lot of these “Old School Philosophies” with their research. I used the example above of the “Thumb to thigh, ball to sky.”

The “Acromial Plane” is when your humorous bone moves above and behind your acromion and jams the supraspinatous into the acromion tip. This can cause an impingement to the rotator cuff, which has been proven to cause injury. This actually almost ended my career as a pitcher.

Here is an article from Wellington Orthopedic by Dr. Harding writing about this information.

http://www.wellingtonortho.com/health/shoulder-safe.html

I also wrote an article on this information.

http://■■■■■■■■■■■.net/separation-the-safe-zone-and-the-power-curve/

My original question is what types of conventional pitching mechanics do we still use today that have withstood the test of time?

How about reaching the power position coincedent with footstrike.

Can you be more specific?

In relation to what the power position is? Or that it is an indicator of good timing and desirable amongst some?
I think back and remember how many pitchers were what was termed "drop and floppers. and had much movement to their wind-up…much different than the minimalist delivery taught by so many today…well the common thread was always that at footstrike the body diplays what I’ve heard termed (Maybe it is a misnomer) the “power position” where the pitching hand is at the apex of it’s backward motion and the glove is in the mirrored reverse on the front…thumb down elbow bent.

When I was a young pitcher my coaches called it the “T Position.” Tom House also called it “Opposite and Equal.”

The saying “Power Position” has definitely stood the test of time but it has become more about “Separation” and “Torque” than where to position your arms.

A good example of the “Power Position” would be Greg Maddux here. You can see the good separation in back hip to back shoulder. This is building torque in his core as you can see with the stretching of his uniform.

Well all right…where do I pick up my prize?? :smiley:

Oh sorry!

You win a … free search at google.

http://www.google.com

Congrats!

well ok…
And I got to see a nifty photo of the Great Greg…steroid free and on the way to GG#18…who could ask for more :smiley:

I would point out that there are all kinds of conventional wisdoms being handed out to aspiring pitchers these days. The best such pitchers succeed in spite of what they’re taught. So, regarding conventional wisdoms, I’d say they pretty much all of them are still being used.

Now if you want to discuss which of them are truly valid, well, that’s another story. The NPA is due to come out with a new book on many (all?) of the bogus conventional wisdoms used in the pitching arena.

oh sure…you tease…
How bout usin some o dat House juice you got to get us some preview action goin on here. :wink:

I’ve inquired more than once about the book. My understanding is that it’s being co-written by the NPA’s motion analysis guy and Tom House. The motion analysis guy has his part done but House is behind with his part. Since he spent the last year playing head coach at some rinky-dink place called USC, he’s been slacking off on his book writing duties. :wink:

Well it is good to know that the NPA has stolen my idea. Kidding!!!

Yes, conventional wisdom will not die. I was just trying to start the “Kill Conventional Wisdom” revolution. I guess the NPA can take it from here!

It’s been my experience that some folks are open-minded and willing to listen to new ideas - including the disproving of their old conventional wisdoms. And then there are those who are set in their ways and will forever believe in some of those conventional wisdoms. It will be a long time before conventional wisdoms go away.

problem with conventional wisdoms is it worked for someone somewhere along the line. problem is it might not work for anybody elso, much less everybody else.

and everyone giving advice at least made the rec league all-star team, ordered a dvd and watched it, and stayed at a holiday inn express at least once.

[quote=“■■■■■■■■■■■.net”]I appreciate the response.

“Conventional Wisdom” of pitching is coaching styles that have been used for decades past. The NPA has broken a lot of these “Old School Philosophies” with their research. I used the example above of the “Thumb to thigh, ball to sky.”[/quote]

I know what conventional wisdom means. I use that term all the time. I want to know what “thumb to thigh, ball to sky” actually means–i.e., what you’re supposed to do, what it’s supposed to accomplish, etc.

I think queues like that can often help. They simply make it easier to understand what you’re doing. Unfortunately, most little bits of phraseology preach things that many who study the physics of the pitching motion would disagree with.