What makes us throw so hard?


#1

What allows pitchers to throw so hard when an average person simply can’t. What do we have that is so special?


#2

Practice, Practice, Practice. The average person just doesn’t want to expend that much time into a game, but to all of us, its more than a game, its our way of life.


#3

It’s all in the technique, legs, hips, trunk, ribcage and arm. Then the timing required to put all of that energy into a baseball.


#4

Not there yet but getting close. lol


#5

Come on someone has to know.


#6

Dude, anybody can throw hard, but you have to start training for it when your young and put the time and energy into making yourself stronger. That drive to become stronger, is what allows us to build our arms and eventually, throw hard.

Normal people = :bigb:

Us = :baseballpitcher: ---------------------------------------------------------- :homeplate: :baseballcatcher:
Over and Over and Over


#7

I don’t think it’s really a matter of throwing harder. I have seen many pitchers who, because they get the whole body into the action—using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous motion, thus generating the power behind their pitches—appear to be throwing very hard but actually use less effort, thus taking a lot of pressure off the arm and the shoulder. This is something I myself learned a long time ago, and much to my great delight I discovered that this was how not to get a sore arm or a sore shoulder or a sore anything else! I was a natural sidearmer, and as I worked with this essential aspect of good mechanics I also found that my delivery had a lot more snap and sizzle to it; even though I didn’t have a fast ball to speak of some of my pitches looked faster than they really were. 8)


#8

[quote=“karatekid552”]Dude, anybody can throw hard, but you have to start training for it when your young and put the time and energy into making yourself stronger. That drive to become stronger, is what allows us to build our arms and eventually, throw hard.
… [/quote]

I’m sure that’s true for some, but I’m just as sure its untrue for others. My son was 5’8/135 as a Sr in HS and could hit 89 when he felt the need. He didn’t have strength, but he had tremendous technique. We have a neighbor who didn’t throw a baseball until he was in his Sr year in HS. He walked on to a JUCO team and was given the #1 starting job because he was throwing in the low 90’s.

What I’m saying is, there are a lot of things that go into it, but no one thing or combination of things work for everyone the same way.


#9

Thanks Zita and Scorekeeper, technique has a ton to do with it also as well as strength. But to develop that technique takes much practice and a lot of time. Also that story about the Senior that could throw 90 just shows that yes there are some people are naturals, but that percent of the population is probably really low.


#10

It doesn’t matter what the percentage is of any particular group. The important thing, is the realization that those groups all exist, and therefore can’t be ignored.

I’m really a terrible person to discuss this kind of thing with because I’m totally convinced that pitching is made up of 3 components, velocity, control, and movement. But more importantly, they all have equal importance in pitching. I think of it much like the RGB colors on a computer. You can have either R, G, or B on its own, have them all in equal amounts to get white, take them all away to get black, or have any combination to get some other color. But no matter what, there will always be a color.

It’s the same with pitchers, They come in all shapes and sizes, and with varying degrees of skill in any of the 3 components. I could name successful pitchers who could throw a strawberry through a battleship, some who had a lot of success because they could put the ball where they wanted it to a high degree, and some who had success because they could move the ball like it was a wiffle ball. But the very very best used a combination that was much more equal.


#11

deception is also another aspect to pitching. a pitcher who throws across his body or has “late life” on his pitches has deception, although those aren’t the only examples to pitching deceptively.


#12

When I was saying what I said, I was just trying to explain the origional question.

Now, yes I understand that naturals exist, but what I was trying to convey is that for the average person, its all about the drive that we have that enables us to throw hard. Its that drive to perfect our teqnique and build our arm strength, that allows us to become faster. Ordinary people don’t have that drive. We get out there everyday practicing, tweaking our teqnique, going to pitching coaches, studying footage of big league pitchers.

Alls TheUnDiscovered asked was why we can throw harder.


#13

Genetics!!!


#14

Most pitchers have a greater understanding of the fundementals of pitching mechanics.
Such as: using the legs, hips, etc. (lower body), to produce the velocity- the arm does not produce velocity.
Having a longer stride (a pitcher’s stride should be 100% of his height).


#15

Most pitchers have a greater understanding of the fundementals of pitching mechanics.
Such as: using the legs, hips, etc. (lower body), to produce the velocity- the arm does not produce velocity.
Having a longer stride (a pitcher’s stride should be 100% of his height).[/quote]

ur kidding me right, " the arm does not produce velocity" lol

Velocity is generated by arm speed. Arm speed is determined by how much fast twitch muscle you have and whether you have the nervous system to use your fast twitch muscles efficiently.

Good mechanics enable you to throw the ball as hard as you can with the least amount of stress on your arm.


#16

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]
ur kidding me right, " the arm does not produce velocity" lol
Velocity is generated by arm speed. Arm speed is determined by how much fast twitch muscle you have and whether you have the nervous system to use your fast twitch muscles efficiently.
Good mechanics enable you to throw the ball as hard as you can with the least amount of stress on your arm.[/quote]

Actually, no. I am not kidding you.
You can ask alot of people (even on this forum- look up Zita Carno),
and they will agree that it is the lower body and core strength that produces a pitcher’s velocity and power.
You are right in saying “Good mechanics enable you to throw the ball as hard as you can with the least amount of stress on your arm”. That is true.


#17

Throwing hard consists of more than one thing. Strength is a big factor but muscles also need to be stretched out in order to reach maximum potential.


#18

What thing?

P.S. I noticed that was your first post-
Welcome to this pitching discussion forum!