What location should i put the ball in these situation?

im looking for some good areas to put the ball i different situations.

3-0 (im guessing just put it in he strike zone)
3-1
3-2
2-1
1-2
0-2
2-0

runner on first-

runner on third-

3-0 most hitters will be expecting a fastball (most pitchers throw that on 3-0 because they know they can get it over), so if you have control of another pitcher- even maybe a changeup or breaking ball- try using it on 3-0 to confuse the batter.
Same thing with 3-1 and 3-2.
It you throw a fastball on 3-0 for a strike, then try a breaking ball.
On 3-2, you just need to get the ball close- most batters will swing if it is close on 3-2.
On a count of 2-1, I would use an off-speed or breaking pitch most likely.
On 1-2, I would use a breaking ball (anywhere)
or a changeup (sometimes even a fastball low and away) low and away.
0-2 definitely go with a breaking ball or off-speed pitch just far enough off the plate so that the hitter can not get good wood on it, but just close enough so that it might be called a strike if the batter doesn’t swing.
2-0 probably go with a fastball to get a strike.

Also, in intense situations, use your best pitch.
When there is a good hitter up- use your best stuff.
Why let him beat up one of your not-so-good pitches?
Most importantly- change speeds, location, and fool hitters with movement.

Cardswin … gave you some very good advice. It’s sound and easy to comprehend.

Here’s some other things to think about - (from a pitching coach’s point of view)

  • What spot in the batting order are you dealing with? First spot, eigth, because it makes a difference.
  • Have you faced this batter before? If so, how did he read?
  • How have you been doing so far? Tired, environment(heat, cold) bother you at all? Got a good night sleep?
  • Are you coming in as a starter, closer** - what?
  • What did your bullpen duty tell you about your first inning pitched? Your first inning should be pitched in the pen, making adjustments (roughly) as you “fit in”.
  • How “on” are you? Be honest with yourself - feeling like a bull or do we feel like sheep today? (You know what I mean.)
  • Has any one on your coaching staff been following this hitter? What’s his tendency. Does he like to chase high heat, is he a “sinker” hitter, etc.?
  • Where in the game does your club stand? Are they ahead by a good margin, tied, or behind? First inning of play or eight?
  • who is up next? Is the next guy a rock or a punch-n-judy stiff.

** Here’s something that’s really important - more so than runs and who wins and who doesn’t. You come in to replace the last pitcher who left those two runners on. You send a pitch down - good bey!
So, the games over and you happen to have a pen next to the guy who you repaced. As your both changing, getting into your street clothes, is he going to be talking ERA stuff to you? You bet your rosin bags he is!
A little know pressure value here that a lot of rookies become aware of early in their careers.

One time I was talking with Ed Lopat, my incredible pitching coach, about his approach to pitching to hitters, and I asked, “It’s kind of like judo, isn’t it?” He replied, "You could say that. The principle is the same—using the opponent’s power against him. You make the hitters supply their own power. You don’t give them anything they can hit. You take their power and turn it back against them."
So if you’re behind in the count—3-0, 3-1 or 3-2—you certainly don’t want to give the batter something he can hit. And nine times out of ten that batter is looking for a fast ball. Don’t give it to him. Come in there with a good changeup or a breaking pitch such as a knuckle-curve or a slider. And don’t be afraid to throw one just a bit out of the strike zone—often the batter will be uncertain as to whether or not to swing at it, and a good breaking pitch will do the trick.
With regard to runners on base—it’s important to know their proclivities. This is especially true with the runner on first; is the guy a “bump on a log”, a runner who isn’t going anywhere—or is he a definite threat to steal? You could throw over there once or twice, just to let the guy know you know he’s there–but don’t fall into the trap of throwing over to first and throwing over to first and throwing over to first just because you’re afraid he’ll steal on you. I’ve seen too many pitchers do this, and they lose their concentration and forget that there’s a guy up there at the plate, and when they finally pitch to the batter—BLAM, over the fence it goes! One thing—if there are runners on first and second or first and third and both of them are speed demons, watch out for the possibility of a double steal. It might be more prudent to walk the batter intentionally and have your infield go to double-play depth; with one out and the bases loaded a good ground ball to the infield can get you out of the inning unscathed.
Above all—trust your stuff. In any of the situations you describe, go with your best pitch—and, as Steady Eddie told me, “Move the ball around—high, low, inside, outside, and change speeds—and stay away from the middle of the plate.” :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:

[quote=“dodgerfan3”]im looking for some good areas to put the ball i different situations.
[/quote]

Actually, there are some spots that you do not want to put certain pitches in.
Such as:
a fastball down and in to a left-handed batter,
a fastball up and out over the plate to any batter,
a slider over the plate from a right-hander to a left-handed hitter,

Hard stuff in, soft stuff away.
Change speeds and location.
Fastballs low, and fastballs in.
Curves, sliders, and change-ups, anywhere (for the most part).

Keep the ball low, lets the batter only see 1/2 of the ball so it is so much harder to hit the ball hard.

Greg Maddux and Pedro Martinez were some of the best at changing speeds, and Maddux had great control.

Be unpredictable.

Coach Baker made some great points.

Another thing to think about:
• With a runner on 3rd what kind of catcher do you have- wall or sieve? That may skew your choice somewhat.

IMO if you pitch based on count you are much more likely to fall into a pattern a coach or player can read- for instance always throwing curveball 0-2.

In general I’m a bigger fan of pitch sequencing with count being more of a secondary consideration. So to me a bigger question or concern is how or with what pitches, at what speed and location, created the current count. Also I’m not particularly concerned about the previous called location but use the actual pitched location to help determine the next pitch. How did the hitter react and what can I throw next? Every pitch teaches the hitter something and how can I use that in my favor.

The link below is to a thread from a while back. It may be interesting reading and in reality probably applies to the majority of pitchers. Some of you may recognize “The Junkman”.

http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=10623&start=0

[quote=“JP”]Coach Baker made some great points.
Another thing to think about:
• With a runner on 3rd what kind of catcher do you have- wall or sieve? That may skew your choice somewhat.
IMO if you pitch based on count you are much more likely to fall into a pattern a coach or player can read- for instance always throwing curveball 0-2.
In general I’m a bigger fan of pitch sequencing with count being more of a secondary consideration. So to me a bigger question or concern is how or with what pitches, at what speed and location, created the current count. Also I’m not particularly concerned about the previous called location but use the actual pitched location to help determine the next pitch. How did the hitter react and what can I throw next? Every pitch teaches the hitter something and how can I use that in my favor.
The link below is to a thread from a while back. It may be interesting reading and in reality probably applies to the majority of pitchers. Some of you may recognize “The Junkman”.

http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=10623&start=0
[/quote]

You’re right, being unpredictable in counts is important in confusing batters.
If a pitcher throws different pitches in each count (throwing a change or breaker where you threw a fastball, or vice versa.),
the hitter will not be able to reliably guess which pitch is coming.

Good answer.
Short and to the point.