What does it take to play college baseball?

I’m 17 and I’m a junior in high school. I’m a solid 5’10 and 190 lbs. I throw about 78-81 (trying to increase that to about 83-84 mph) with good location on all 3 pitches (fastball, curve, change). I’ve been playing varsity since 9th grade, and I play all summer and fall. My dream is to play college baseball. I play and train all year. I’ve gone to a few
showcases, and I’ve been pretty successful. I’m wondering if any of you have some good feedback on what else I could be doing to reach that goal of being a college pitcher.

–Thanks
Jay

Dear JDA:

I am going to forward your email to two of my college coaching friends and I will post their respected responses. Hopefully, they will reply in the next day. Thanks.

Jay -

I truly believe that if you are doing what you need to be doing interms of working out and staying health. You might want to find a pitching program that is specific for what you are trying to accomplish, in terms of mph’s. I would also suggest that you stick to a routine throughout the year, especially moving into you junior season and senior year. You might want to sit-down with your coach and come up with a routine that he agrees with and will help you stick to it. You will get the opportunity you are looking for. It may not come in the form of your dream school, but you will play college baseball at a school where you will have something to contribute. The biggest thing that you real need to be focused on is your high school grades. You have the next year and a half to get them at a strong grade point, many college look to see if you are as dedicated to your school work as much as you are dedicated to baseball. I hope that this little bit of advice is helpful.

Rory Jackson
Assistant Baseball Coach
Spalding University
NAIA World Series

2002, 2003, 2005

Thank you both for your feedback. As to your note about my grades…I have been told that before which is why I’ve worked very hard to get my GPA to a 3.6 and my SAT practice tests are in 1200-1300 range. I’m already doing a strength and conditioning program, but I will definately take your advice and sit down with my coach and come up with a routine. Thanks again.

-Jay

Jay,

It sounds like your off to a great start.

I would suggest that you make a list of schools that you’re interested in, and you feel you’re capable of pitching for. I would then make contact with those schools( e-mail, letter, filling out a questionairre on their website…) It’s a good idea to be proactive and get your name out there. I would do these things as a junior. That way schools have a chance to see and evaluate you before the spring or summer of your senior year. As schools start showing interest, I wouldn’t hesitate to have your coach contact the college on your behalf.

I think you’ve got the right idea as far as improving your velocity. If you can get yourself up to that 83-84 mph range, that would really help you attract more attention from colleges. I would really work on improving velocity, especially in the offseason. I would suggest you get on some sort of throwing program specifically designed for gaining velocity. i.e. weighted ball workout

Keep working and learning.

Good Luck,

Matt Den Hartog
Assistant Coach Baseball (Infielders/Hitters)
Northwestern College
Great Plains Athletic Conference
NAIA

hey I pitch at DII Queens College in New York and let me tell you a few major things you have to do now… 1) have a good attitude, I came out of HS as the team joker, and I still am but I really REALLY had to tone it down. They dont put up with it in college 2) The hitters at the college level as im sure you know are a lot better than the hitters in high school so try to get involved with a really serious summer team that plays the best competition you can find if you arent already… and 3) run on your own… i dont know anything about the school you go to, but for me the jump from conditioning to high school to the conditioning in college was rediculous either start doing sprints or running a mile or 2 everyday on your own.

colllege baseball is no cakewalk. But there are plenty of programs that just want guys out there that are willing to work hard and be a good example even if there might not be a shot of you contributing to varsity or whatever. Look into some NAIA programs and some D3 programs.

everyone tells me that if you have the grades, you have a better chance of going to play somewhere than others. as coaches, do you first look at grades and then talent or does talent still come first?

Depends on HOW talented. If you’re a baseballamerica top propspect of alflac all american then the coach will make it happen no matter what your grades are.

If you have good grade it does a couple of things for the coach - He doesn’t have to pull any strings if you’re already set getting in
also, you wont need as much athletic scholarship because the coach will find you academic money. This may not seem important to the player athlete but the more money a coach can save off you, the more valuable you as a prospective player becomes.

[quote=“JDA”]I’m 17 and I’m a junior in high school. I’m a solid 5’10 and 190 lbs. I throw about 78-81 (trying to increase that to about 83-84 mph) with good location on all 3 pitches (fastball, curve, change). I’ve been playing varsity since 9th grade, and I play all summer and fall. My dream is to play college baseball. I play and train all year. I’ve gone to a few
showcases, and I’ve been pretty successful. I’m wondering if any of you have some good feedback on what else I could be doing to reach that goal of being a college pitcher.

–Thanks
Jay[/quote]

Is your arm healthy?

Jeff,

In case you didn’t realize it, the post you replied to was posted 2 years ago.

[quote=“Roger”]Jeff,

In case you didn’t realize it, the post you replied to was posted 2 years ago.[/quote]

no it wasnt, maybe 2 MONTHS not years lol

My bad. I meant to say the original post was 2 years old.

But, regardless, you’e missing the point. His question was directed at the original poster who last posted 2 years go. :roll:

I bought a baseball training facility 2 years ago and have been really busy getting it going. I am back now. Ready to learn.
Thanks
Jeff Hunter

[quote=“JDA”]I’m 17 and I’m a junior in high school. I’m a solid 5’10 and 190 lbs. I throw about 78-81 (trying to increase that to about 83-84 mph) with good location on all 3 pitches (fastball, curve, change). I’ve been playing varsity since 9th grade, and I play all summer and fall. My dream is to play college baseball. I play and train all year. I’ve gone to a few
showcases, and I’ve been pretty successful. I’m wondering if any of you have some good feedback on what else I could be doing to reach that goal of being a college pitcher.

–Thanks
Jay[/quote]

RUNRUNRUNRUNRUNRUNRUNRUNRUNRUN!!!

Your goiing to do alot of running, at least we do. So, be prepared for it. You should be running like a crazy man for the 3 or 4 months before you go to college. It helped me out. But you gotta keep that up after you get there.

I’m new to this site and found it because I’ve been searching for anything related to college recruitment for a high school junior RHP who tore his ucl in December of junior year.
I’ve been training intensely for the past 6 months with running program, stretching, lifting, and long toss. I brought my velo up to 90 topping out at 92 this past November, and several D1 schools contacted my pitching coach and wanted footage and I 've been in touch with some of these coaches myself. There is one coach/school in particular I really want to play for. I injured my arm throwing a fastball during a filming. I was not staying within myself because I remember I was trying to do better than before.
I am 16 years old and have never had a sports injury before this.
I had the MRI w/the dye earlier this month, and the radiologist said partial tear, but the surgeon thought it was more like a complete tear and he recommended Tommy John asap since my velocity is high and it will most likely be an issue eventually if I keep progressing and intend to pitch at a high level.
I go for a third opinion tomorrow.
I haven’t thrown a ball for over a month and I feel no pain. I still run and workout, stretch, do towel drills, shoot hoops with no pain or anything, I just haven’t throw a ball.
I am hoping that I am healing on my own and that the first surgeon who read the MRI was wrong about how bad the tear was.
But what do college coaches really think of pitchers who throw hard and have already injured their pitching elbow? Am I considered a huge risk even if I can pitch successfully this season without the surgery?
I think if I have the surgery now and even back strong my senior yr it will be too late to get recruited to play D1. Please tell me I’m wrong.
I’m trying to get a realistic handle on this so I make the best decision for a chance to play D1.
Appreciate any advice.

You really have to think about it long and hard and also discuss it with your parents.

Thanks for the reply and advice.
I got a letter yesterday from a D1 school saying that most programs are active in the early signing period in November of each year, and that this spring/summer is the most important time period for me because most D1 schools’ preference is to sign recruits off their junior year performance and summer ball accomplishments between junior/senior year, and the letter says virtually all of their recruits are signed this way (junior year). So that’s why I’m really wondering if I should give it a shot this year and not have/put off surgery. The big risk is if I’m not fully healed and I can’t pitch at 100%, and that’s probably a real high risk not worth taking.
I think you’re right about listening to the doctor and having the surgery, I just haven’t come to terms with not playing this year, and in the back of my mind worried about the possibility of hurting my college recruitment opportunities.
Thanks again. It will be a lot of hard work w/rehab, but I’m motivated and will do whatever it takes to return myself to the mound successfully. I’d rather be healed and 100% for college than get all broken down in high school, and then probably wipe out my recruitment opps altogether.

Check out the highschool baseball web its a great asset that will be helpful for you. They too have a forum.

Many guys have surgery in HS and go onto play College ball. Throwing at that velocity now you’ll be attracting schools and be up front and honest with them about your situation. Also remember if you have TJ and work hard on your recovery chances are the velocity will come back.

IM a junior in High School. Im 6’2 155 pounds and Im Throwing upper 70’s to low 80’s what can i do to get my speed up?