What Do You Guys Think Of This?


#1

Here is a link about recovering after pitching: http://www.webball.com/cms/page2008.cfm

I’m just wondering, some people say lactic acid builds up when pitching while other’s say it doesn’t. I don’t really know if it does or not but I can say that running when I have a sore arm and icing makes it feel better the next day. If it’s not lactic acid then what is happening when you run after pitching? So what do you think about running and even icing for that matter?


#2

When you run after pitching you increase bloodflow to your arm and promote quicker healing/recovery. The purpose of ice is to reduce inflammation which can tend to restrict bloodflow. Unfortunately, the ice also tends to restrict bloodflow temporarily. However, if there has been enough damage done to cause inflammation then icing will help by reducing the inflammation. Running later on will get bloodflow back to the affected area and as long as inflammation doesn’t get in the way it will help the arm recover sooner. The trick is figuring out when the inflammation has been knocked out and it is safe to resume activity and that depends on the individual and the amount of damage done to the arm. Usually the arm is not taxed much at all by running and it is safe to run any time after throwing.

The general approach for injuries is to knock down inflammation and then once the inflammation has been stopped to then try to do things to increase blood flow to the affected area. If you do things to increase blood flow too soon before the inflammation has been knocked out then there’s a risk of increasing the inflammation and actually decreasing the blood flow to the affected area.

Right now with my son we are using NSAIDs and rest to handle the inflammation (doctor’s orders) and aren’t icing. Generally, I wouldn’t recommend using NSAIDs.

The stuff on webball looks fine to me other than the reference to lactic acid, which many people do not believe is stored in the arm as a result of throwing. It really doesn’t matter though as the effects of increasing blood flow to the arm are positive in any case.


#3

CADAD knows what he’s talkin’ about here.


#4

[quote=“CADad”]When you run after pitching you increase bloodflow to your arm and promote quicker healing/recovery. The purpose of ice is to reduce inflammation which can tend to restrict bloodflow. Unfortunately, the ice also tends to restrict bloodflow temporarily. However, if there has been enough damage done to cause inflammation then icing will help by reducing the inflammation. Running later on will get bloodflow back to the affected area and as long as inflammation doesn’t get in the way it will help the arm recover sooner. The trick is figuring out when the inflammation has been knocked out and it is safe to resume activity and that depends on the individual and the amount of damage done to the arm. Usually the arm is not taxed much at all by running and it is safe to run any time after throwing.

The general approach for injuries is to knock down inflammation and then once the inflammation has been stopped to then try to do things to increase blood flow to the affected area. If you do things to increase blood flow too soon before the inflammation has been knocked out then there’s a risk of increasing the inflammation and actually decreasing the blood flow to the affected area.

Right now with my son we are using NSAIDs and rest to handle the inflammation (doctor’s orders) and aren’t icing. Generally, I wouldn’t recommend using NSAIDs.

The stuff on webball looks fine to me other than the reference to lactic acid, which many people do not believe is stored in the arm as a result of throwing. It really doesn’t matter though as the effects of increasing blood flow to the arm are positive in any case.[/quote]

Why not icing? I have good results with it. Works a lot better than NSAIDs in my opinion.