Weights


#1

What should I be working on in the weight room as a 13 year old pitcher?


#2

Overall Strength using HIT


#3

you should do your own research and come to the conclusion of what type of training will help you the most.

Make sure the person or people you’re taking advice from have shown the consistent ability to get pitchers strong and healthy.

that being said, I would recommend http://ericcressey.com/blog if you want the absolute cream of the crop in terms of baseball strength and performance coaching.

In a nutshell, you will be looking to get bigger, stronger and faster. A well thought out program will reflect those goals, with max strength work, hypertrophy work and explosive/plyometric work. Put yourself on the path to success from a young age. Let someone help you whose job it is to get athletes stronger and help them perform better. You will be doing yourself a huge favor in the longrun, and you can always stop after a couple months if you dont see huge gains (hint: you will).


#4

I wouldn’t be doing much heavy lifting yet.


#5

At 13 you should be working on cardio and conditioning…I think that you should wait till at least 15 to hit the weights.


#6

At this time I would work on general strength - just getting stronger. Many ways to do this and some are better than others. How you do it will depend on what equipment you have available (do you have a gym membership), the time you have available, and your committment level.

My recommendation would be not to fall into the trap of doing a body builder type workout. Instead I would focus on compound lifts or movements that impact multiple muscles. Specific exercises will depend on the equipment you have available and in some cases if someone is available to coach you on the proper techniques for doing an exercise (you need to have a knowledgeable person teach you how to do back squats and deadlifts).

Last week at the Y - I watched a kid fall down in the power rack with 135 lbs loaded up on his back for a back squat. He was squatting with his shoes untied, his stance close together, and too much weight. His shoe came off, left knee caved (valgus), he tripped over his shoe and down he went. He didn’t drop the weight though - so he was sittting on the ground with 135 pounds on his rounded back. Not a pretty seen. We pulled the weight off of him and he stood up and didn’t seem like he was hurt. I haven’t seen him since.


#7

until you begin puberty (normally 15-17), you will get better use from your time working on your skill development, technique and quickness.


#8

I would do the basic lifts but keep the rep range in the 13-18 area. Several studies by A. Faigenbaum have shown this is the best range at your age for getting stronger. He has a book out also but this is the most valuable piece of infor from it. Your muscles wont grow until the Testosterone production kicks in, but you will get stronger.


#9

I’ll admit that it might be better idea to be a little conservative with the weights until you hit around 15 years old. You should still do some strength training but I’ll agree with Dusty that skill development and technique are most important at this stage in your career.


#10

http://www.drdarden.com/readTopic.do?id=531458

The best way to do that is through strength training.


#11

Placing stress such as lifting eights on underdeveloped joints and still maturing joints can definately have negative impact on younger individuals, that is why I think weights shouldn’t be added until at least 15.


#12

In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, after studying the risks and benefits, concluded that weight training for children:

• Increases muscle strength,
• Improves muscle endurance,
• Enhances motor skill,
• Protects against injury,
• Supplies positive psychological benefits.


#13

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]
In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, after studying the risks and benefits, concluded that weight training for children:
• Increases muscle strength,
• Improves muscle endurance,
• Enhances motor skill,
• Protects against injury,
• Supplies positive psychological benefits.[/quote]

What do they mean by children? what ages?
Do they mean for all children- or for physically fit children- or who?