Weighted baseballs strictly as an offseason activity

I started using weighted baseballs in college in the offseason and kept with them through pro ball. I generally think they can be useful for well trained athletes. But would be cautious using them inseason. But it raises the question: are WBs offseason aids only? Or, have/would you incorporate them inseason too if you use them at all. (Thats another question entirely.)

We curtail their use in-season pretty heavily. It’s more of an off-season thing.

Back in 1986-87 year at Cal. We were one of eight schools as a test group for Coop Derenne and Tom House’s Power Baseball research. This was the overload/underload throwing program. It consisted of weighted balls. We had three groups on our pitching staff in the fall. A group that did a 7 oz to 4oz to 5 oz, a group that went 7 oz to 5 oz, and I believe 5 oz to 4 oz. I was part of the 7 oz to 5 oz.
The 1st group had the best gains. Unfortunately those gains did not stick as the season went on. The test kinda faded and like all this returns to full circle. The whole reason for not maintaining the gain is that everyone changes the routine in fear of in season throwing. Which is normal. If you do weighted ball work, it has to be an all the time thing. If not it turns to a placebo type gig. This is why their Book “Power Baseball” remains unrevised.
I like weighted balls, I just can’t keep the routine for the in season. Monitoring intent and effort, produces the same result and is easier to maintain routine wise. For me.

We conduct a six week long camp utilizing the same principles of Dr. House and Coop DeRenne with 4,5, and 6oz balls from the middle of October through the month of November at our academy in NJ. We’ve had a lot of success helping our students add to their arm strength and peak velocities over the last 7 years. I have had numerous requests to hold the same program during the spring and summer months however I believe that it is best utilized during the calendar year when my students are not competitively pitching.

I’m right with you in doing the same with my returning varsity pitchers who we’ve set up on an off-season throwing program to try to continue to successes our team had from this past Spring.

I’ve utilized many of the same principles myself with Coop’s stuff when I used WBs. Good stuff!

[quote=“Fred Corral”]Back in 1986-87 year at Cal. We were one of eight schools as a test group for Coop Derenne and Tom House’s Power Baseball research. This was the overload/underload throwing program. It consisted of weighted balls. We had three groups on our pitching staff in the fall. A group that did a 7 oz to 4oz to 5 oz, a group that went 7 oz to 5 oz, and I believe 5 oz to 4 oz. I was part of the 7 oz to 5 oz.
The 1st group had the best gains. Unfortunately those gains did not stick as the season went on. The test kinda faded and like all this returns to full circle. The whole reason for not maintaining the gain is that everyone changes the routine in fear of in season throwing. Which is normal. If you do weighted ball work, it has to be an all the time thing. If not it turns to a placebo type gig. This is why their Book “Power Baseball” remains unrevised.
I like weighted balls, I just can’t keep the routine for the in season. Monitoring intent and effort, produces the same result and is easier to maintain routine wise. For me.[/quote]

Great stuff, Fred. Appreciate your contributions on the forum.