weighted balls

Good stuff, JP…

Here’s the abstract for your 2nd citation with some details:

Sports Med. 2000 Apr;29(4):259-72.

Effects of throwing overweight and underweight baseballs on throwing velocity and accuracy.

Escamilla RF, Speer KP, Fleisig GS, Barrentine SW, Andrews JR.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. rescamil@duke.edu

The purpose of this review is to determine how throwing overweight and underweight baseballs affects baseball throwing velocity and accuracy. Two studies examined how a warm-up with overweight baseballs affected throwing velocity and accuracy of 5 oz regulation baseballs. One of these studies showed significant increases in throwing velocity and accuracy, while the other study found no significant differences. Three training studies (6 to 12 weeks in duration) using overweight baseballs were conducted to determine how they affected ball accuracy while throwing regulation baseballs. No significant differences were found in any study. From these data it is concluded that warming up or training with overweight baseballs does not improve ball accuracy. Seven overweight and 4 underweight training studies (6 to 12 weeks in duration) were conducted to determine how throwing velocity of regulation baseballs was affected due to training with these overweight and underweight baseballs. The overweight baseballs ranged in weight from 5.25 to 17 oz, while the underweight baseballs were between 4 and 4.75 oz. Data from these training studies strongly support the practice of training with overweight and underweight baseballs to increase throwing velocity of regulation baseballs. Since no injuries were reported throughout the training studies, throwing overweight and underweight baseballs may not be more stressful to the throwing arm compared to throwing regulation baseballs. However, since currently there are no injury data related to throwing overweight and underweight baseballs, this should be the focus of subsequent studies. In addition, research should be initiated to determine whether throwing kinematics and kinetics are different between throwing regulation baseballs and throwing overweight and underweight baseballs.

PMID: 10783901

I am of the opinion that weighed balls do not increase pitching velocity.
Velocity comes from the lower body, including the legs, hips, etc.

Here are some article to prove my point:

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/weighted-bats-have-proven-not-to-work-just-like-weighted-balls

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/convincing-arguments-for-baseball-pitchers-throwing-weighted-baseballs-that/

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/the-hype-on-weighted-baseballs-to-improve-pitching-velocity-will-soon-end-b/

[quote=“CardsWin”]I am of the opinion that weighed balls do not increase pitching velocity.
Velocity comes from the lower body, including the legs, hips, etc.

Here are some article to prove my point:

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/weighted-bats-have-proven-not-to-work-just-like-weighted-balls

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/convincing-arguments-for-baseball-pitchers-throwing-weighted-baseballs-that/

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/the-hype-on-weighted-baseballs-to-improve-pitching-velocity-will-soon-end-b/[/quote]

Quoting Dick Mills, who on any given day may argue that the sky is green just to be different, may not be the best way to disprove the use of weighted baseballs.

palo20-
well, what’s your opinion?
Do weighted balls help increase velocity?

[quote=“CardsWin”]palo20-
well, what’s your opinion?
Do weighted balls help increase velocity?[/quote]

My expert opinion?

Maybe

I didn’t ask for your expert opinion.
Do you consider yourself an expert?
:lol:

CardsWin,

You did ask for palo’s opinion. If you get an expert opinion that’s a bonus.

BTW, I consider palo20 an expert.

-Roger

[quote=“Roger”]CardsWin,

You did ask for palo’s opinion. If you get an expert opinion that’s a bonus.

BTW, I consider palo20 an expert.

-Roger[/quote]

Ditto on palo.

Although I used weighted balls every off-season for a few months, I really believe it was more of the other stuff that I was doing in conjunction with the throwing that made the difference – the weight lifting, the stretching, the conditioning, etc. Add everything all up, and wahlah - more velocity. But take any one part out, like, say, conditioning, and you probably don’t get the same results.

So in my opinion, just chucking weighted balls around without the other stuff ain’t going to do it for ya.

Re: "[i]I am of the opinion that weighed balls do not increase pitching velocity.
Velocity comes from the lower body, including the legs, hips, etc.

Here are some article to prove my point:

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/weighted-bats-have-proven-not-to-work-just-like-weighted-balls

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/convincing-arguments-for-baseball-pitchers-throwing-weighted-baseballs-that/

http://www.pitching.com/articles/view/the-hype-on-weighted-baseballs-to-improve-pitching-velocity-will-soon-end-b/[/i]"

-------------That’s pretty funny. You quote three opinion pieces written by pitching tout Dick Mills to “prove” your point, and completely ignore scientifically conducted studies from ASMI researchers and from Coop DeRenne that strongly support the opposite conclusion. Thanks for sharing your wisdom.

Ok, since nobody likes Dick Mills, I’ll write something of my own accord.
Throwing a weighted ball would be more helpful in gaining stamina than increasing velocity.
Weighted balls and long toss, etc., don’t really increase velocity.
If they did, then everybody who was using the weighted balls and long toss would be throwing a lot faster.
Most of a pitcher’s power is produced through his lower body and core.
The longer a pitcher can use his legs, hips, etc. without tiring them, the longer he will be able to pitch.
Arm strength doesn’t really factor in pitching.
It’s the body that produces the power
and that’s why I believe that weighted balls and long toss should not be used to gain velocity- they can help with stamina, not velocity.
Just my opinion…

Pitching requires limber brains and well-coordinated muscles,
not only of the throwing arm, but also of the entire body.

[quote=“CardsWin”]Throwing a weighted ball would be more helpful in gaining stamina than increasing velocity.
Weighted balls and long toss, etc., don’t really increase velocity.
If they did, then everybody who was using the weighted balls and long toss would be throwing a lot faster.
Just my opinion…[/quote]

Oh boy … and around and around we go. :roll:

World class sprinters train with parachutes on their back, to add resistance. Usain Bolt trains with someone pulling giant resistance bands from behind (like a pitcher using a 6 oz ball) and then pulling from the front (like a 4 oz ball). Dude’s the fastest man alive, but even for Usain there’s a limit to how fast the body can actually move, just like no pitcher in our lifetime is going to throw 110 mph.

I’ve played with and against some DUMB pitchers who were lights-out :slight_smile:

CardsWin, you’re on the right track.
I remember when I was a kid and I would go to Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark) every chance I got. I would sit in the upper deck behind home plate or close to it, and I would watch the pitchers during practice, warming up and in games. And I saw that the Yankees’ Big Three pitchers were all doing the same thing—they were driving off the loser half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were generating the power behind their pitches. The arm and shoulder were just going along for the ride, and a lot of pressure was taken off them so they could all throw harder and faster—even Ed Lopat, who was by no means a fireballer.
I saw just how they were doing this, and I made a mental note of it and started working on it on my own. As I practiced this essential—and believe me, it is essential—aspect of good mechanics, I found that I was doing the same thing those guys were, and even though I wasn’t much on speed I could throw harder with less effort! How not to get a sore arm, or a sore shoulder, or a sore anything else. And my natural sidearm delivery had more snap and sizzle to it.
Yes, you are so right. The pitcher’s power comes from getting the whole body into the action, not just throwing with the arm or the shoulder or whatever the heck one throws the ball with. There are a number of drills and exercises for this, and they can be found on this website—for example, the so-called “Hershiser drill” which aims at getting the hips fully involved. Of course, these were way after my time, and I had to figure out how to work on these things—but figure it out I did. 8) :slight_smile:

[quote=“CardsWin”]Pitching requires limber brains and well-coordinated muscles,
not only of the throwing arm, but also of the entire body.[/quote]

Are you Dick Mills in disguise? I swear he shows up here about once a year.

How is it that in some threads you’re an expert on “throwing with your entire body” and “striding to 100% of your height” but in other threads you’re unaware of throwing across your body and the general purpose behind the Cy Young award?

to say someone is a DUMB pitcher is an oxymoron because there are all different types of intelligence. One can be visually intelligent, audio intelligent, as well as kintically intelligent (the list goes on). It doesn’t do any justice to pinpoint intelligence down into a few particular categories like society does.

I know doctors who are bad communicators. I know pitchers who can’t write. I know math teachers who are terrible listeners.

Pitching is a form of kinetic intelligence.

OMG, I was kidding!! :slight_smile:

Well at least my equipment was never called “tools of ignorance” 8)

RiStar?!?

Sounds like we finally got some dispute in here again.

Well, well, well! Look who decided to show himself.

Where the heck have you been, Hammer?