Weight lifting


#1

Ive seen arguments about if weight lifting does anything for pitchers and i just wante to share this. Even though people like roy oswalt and tim lincecum and all small pitchers throw hard is not only beacuse they move fast in thier deliveries.Even though they only weight 170-180 lbs they are very strong. A couple of years ago i won a contest that let you have lounce with a houston astro. And when i got there they had assinged seast and i ended up with a pitcher and i was happy beacuse I was a pitcher. Anyways e started talking and i asked them what type of weight lifting they did and he said they lift weights(light and heavy) almost everyday and asked them what types of lifts they did, and he said all kind including squat,dumbells,bench press, and alot of others ive never heard of. So i just wanted to say that even small 160 lb guys that throw hard dont do it just cause they move fast alot gas to do with how strong they are from lifting so IMO weights can help you increase velo…IMO :wink: :wink:


#2

how long ago was that?

Pitchers in the Mlb are functional training with weights now, not alot of bench press and machine work anymore.


#3

RIstar is your head under a rock?? Name 10 baseball players that he never done weightlifting.

Most baseball players do weightlitfing, they do high rep. low weight weightlifting for pitchers and heavier lifting for fielders(hitters). Yes they do other workouts, but the majority do weightlifting.


#4

I never said they didn’t do weight lifting LOL. You miss read what I have said. What i said was that right now they are doign more functional weight lifting that is not about the leg press and the bench press or the leg curl. It’s about the lunge and core and weight lifting.

But 2 legged machine evercises along with 2 arm machine exercises like the shoulder press to name one are not good because you can do plyo metrics that are more explosive and put the stability aspect to training.

Granted weight lifting is good some old exercises that pitchers use to do don’t make sence any more.

I’m all for funsctional weight lifting like most of tuff cuff.


#5

ok so you’re saying squats are bad for pitchers?


#6

LOl you can do a One legged squat or a squat on differnet plane.

So a reg squat is no good but a functional squat on different plane is better and One legged squat is ok.


#7

it was about alomost 3 years ago


#8

no if you know how to do squats properly, they arent bad for pitchers.


#9

Oo i know that BUT a one legged squat or a squat on a dina disc is more for the sport of baseball because it adds a plane like throwing down a mound or stability for one leg when pitching.


#10

and i’m guessing you only use your right leg if you’re right handed? and right arm for arm lifts if you’re right handed?


#11

No way.

The plant leg with a one legged squat is important to stabilize and then shift the weight from the back leg. You need a muscle balance in upper body and lower body.

Best exercises for upper body ploymetric push-ups om differemt plane.


#12

[quote=“RIstar”]LOl you can do a One legged squat or a squat on differnet plane.

So a reg squat is no good but a functional squat on different plane is better and One legged squat is ok.[/quote]

Do you really think this seriously you know form your own experiences that squating doesn’t help you. And if you can find proof of it I would like to see it and don’t give me any of that dick mills bs.


#13

wow there you go putting words in my mouth i DIDN’T SAY. I said a squat was good bt if you want it to be for pitching do it on a dina disc or different plane and do it one legged because pitching is on one leg most of the time.

People need to stop putting words in my mouth and read what I write not 10% what I write but the whole post.


#14

why does it matter if you do regular squats or this one-legged bs you’re talking about?


#15

Well lets think of it.

When you pitch what leg are you most on? Well its one leg then the other. So the dina disc and one legged squats are more for pitching down a mound.

Dina disc or a squat on a step because that gives a different plane like when you are pitching down a mound.


#16

ok well if you do regular squat, it will give you that explosive power you always praise about in your back leg and you can use it to push off the mound.


#17

Yeah and you can do that with a one legged squat too. And you can get more stability with a one legged squat that will help balance on a mound.


#18

as long as you don’t do squats on a machine, then you can devolpe balance the same way.


#19

Just to address a couple things…

High rep low weight training is not what a pitcher should be doing. In fact, there are very few athletes that should be training in that style. The idea that anything other than high rep low weight will make you bulky is a myth. Just look at athletes that train for sports with weight classes (boxers, wrestlers, kickboxers, mma fighters). You will rarely see a bulky boxer, but most are insanely strong for their weight. You dont get that with low weight high rep.

RIStar and kb,
One legged squats are an excellent exercise to develop balance and strength, but they are only one means to an end. Barbell squats challenge the core, forcing the body to act to maintain the weight (whether front or back squats). I disagree with the assertion that one is more sport specific than the other - neither is replicated on the pitching motion. Attributes like balance, leg strength, and core strength need to be adapted to the act of pitching. If you include both in your training, you’ll be that much stronger. Excluding one style of training is a good way to assure that your competition will pass you by in the offseason.


#20

[quote=“RIstar”]I never said they didn’t do weight lifting LOL. You miss read what I have said. What i said was that right now they are doign more functional weight lifting that is not about the leg press and the bench press or the leg curl. It’s about the lunge and core and weight lifting.

But 2 legged machine evercises along with 2 arm machine exercises like the shoulder press to name one are not good because you can do plyo metrics that are more explosive and put the stability aspect to training.

Granted weight lifting is good some old exercises that pitchers use to do don’t make sence any more.

I’m all for funsctional weight lifting like most of tuff cuff.[/quote]
A couple notes here:
-I agree with you on the machine work. But I would substitute Deadlifts for leg curls and squats for the leg press. Instead of machine shoulder presses, I’d go with a push press.

-Explosive training is limited by two things: the amount of weight you can use and the frequency with which you can train. Explosiveness, by it’s nature, has to be done with a submaximal load. If I do squat jumps, I will not be able to do them with 400 pounds on my back. Same goes with any muscle group. What is the result? Lack of maximal strength. Why is this a problem? Explosive strength has a correlation to max strength, ie. training in one style complements the other. Sprinters with higher max squat numbers generally run faster (allowing for stride efficiency and such).

And secondly, the issue of frequency. If you only train explosively, with plyos or otherwise, you will not be able to train as often. Most trainers agree that training plyos more than twice a week can be counterproductive, putting too much strain on the muscles and not allowing time for recovery. In fact, most top boxing trainers will hold their athletes to one or two days of explosive strength work a week (once every 5 days, Enamait*). This manner of training allows the athlete to reap the benefits of the explosiveness training, while still being able to recover before the next session.