Way to go guys .. brilliant, just brilliant!

I will never figure out why head coaches get tossed … I just don’t get it.

Showing your guys you’re there for them? Being a standup guy? “I’ll show them?”

WHAT!!!

During a Red Sox game recently, skipper Francona started arguing balls and strikes with home plate umpire Bill Miller. Miller got a little upset –“you’re out-a here!”

So, here we have Francona leaving the dugout and going to the clubhouse just when his club needs him the most. He’s no long observing his club, making adjustments when and where necessary, being there to counsel and receive said same from his staff and players. Nope … Francona takes a walk … big of him. All his expertise and experience is gone.

Now before you remark that that’s what a head coach is suppose to do – I must tell you that if leaving the game is such a causal thing to do, or that showing support for a team means jumping up and down and upsetting umpires… then getting tossed is it, I strongly suggest to rethink the meaning of the word manager.

Every single club that I’ve been with that’s had our skipper tossed has suffered big time. The remaining coaches and myself have had to think through and fine tune our skipper’s game plan, but with disastrous results. And without fail … we’d hear from players and staffers alike …” way to go guys … brilliant, just brilliant.” Meaning we screwed up and anyone and everyone had to tell us. Well, we’re not head coach material, nor will I ever be that’s for sure.

So look, if you’re a head coach – keep your antics to yourself, cry and moan under your breath, bring a paper bag and put it over your head and make all the facial expressions that you want. Just stay in the game and do what’s expected of you – MANAGE!

Coach B.

The thing is, the coach still makes decisions in the game even when he gets tossed. This point actually came up quite a bit during Mariners games because Lou Pinella would get tossed frequently, however, admitted he watched the games from in the clubhouse, and would make decisions at the call of a phone. While I agree that when coaches get tossed it can be deflating, they are not absolutely out of the loop from the rest of the game.

“out of the loop” … you say? Yes, that’s a good phrase … “out of the loop”.

Tell you what (no sarcasm meant here), you coach a game, sitting in the club house and see how long it takes your team to find another coach. It doesn’t wash with the players, it doesn’t wash with the staff coaches, and it sure as @#!! doesn’t wash with the people who are paying the bills. And by the way - when a coach gets the heave-ho, he’s not to have any contact what’s so ever with the team in play - period. That’s the rules. If I knew an opposing coach was still coaching after being tossed - I’d squawk big time … all the way up to the league’s commissioner’s office if I had to.

There’s a name for the head coach of a ball club - Skipper. The word alludes to the captain of a ship. A person that “skippers” the ship and who is responsible for its crew and all sailing decisions. Take the skipper off the deck and put him in a cabin and expect smooth sailing - ain’t gonna happen.

I respect your observation and your opinion. But from where I’ve been, with all the clubs that I’ve been with - we never benefited from our head coach taking a walk.

Perhaps some of the other coaches that visit this site have had better experiences - I have not.

Coach B.

I think if you asked Terry he’d tell you he made a mistake. You rarely see him get tossed out of a game because he doesn’t get in the umpire’s face and spit nickles at him. This might have been a day when he overestimated Miller’s patience.

The general premise of your arguement stands true. A manager can’t manage effectively from the clubhouse. However, Francona is no Billy Martin or Lou Pinella. He’s actually a pretty stand up guy.

However,

Francona IS the example of my original post and my follow up.(Good observation Dino) Adding, that … sure, sometimes the feeling of “enough is enough”, gets the best of all of us. And I’m no exception … and yes… I’ve been tossed a few times … not proud of it… could have handled things better … left my skipper and the bench in a awkward situation. But I didn’t make a practice of it. Nor do the coaches and players that understand their contribution to a club’s game plan on the field.

Besides, getting toss does add another element that a coach and player has to deal with later - the next game with the same or parts of the umpire’s crew that gave the heeve-ho. Personality conflicts, prejudging, prejudices, and on it goes… all surface again and it’s not a good start, usually.

So look, the purpose of my post was not to paint a total picture that all such action is done on a regular basis - that’s absurd. Yes, it happens. But when it does, it should be a one or two shot deal during the season.

Like I said - coaches are there to coach - live time, not from some obscure corner, back office, from the parking lot, etc.

Coach B.

And look at guys like Earl Weaver, who probably holds the major league record for ejections, and Bobby Cox, who runs a close second—those two guys are not exactly known for emotional equilibrium. They, and others like them, could—and should—take an example from an old-timer who once called time, looked at the ump, and the dialog went something like this:
Batter—"What would you do if I called you a meathead, sourpussed old crab?"
Umpire—"I’d run you out of the game."
Batter—"And if I thought you were all that but didn’t say anything?"
Umpire—"I couldn’t do anything."
The batter stood there and looked at the umpire for two minutes. Then, stepping back into the batter’s box, he said, "All right, we can now resume play. :slight_smile: "

[color=blue]Batter—"What would you do if I called you a meathead, sourpussed old crab?"
Umpire—"I’d run you out of the game."
Batter—"And if I thought you were all that but didn’t say anything?"
Umpire—"I couldn’t do anything."
The batter stood there and looked at the umpire for two minutes. Then, stepping back into the batter’s box, he said, "All right, we can now resume play.
[/color]"

Oh that’s beautiful!!!

There’s a crew I usually meet with on Thursday mornings for a cup of joe and some small talk … I’m going to pass that along.

One of our crew was a umpire and did a stint in the Minors for a few years until his health got the best of him. I’m going to enjoy this. :hyper:

Coach B.