Visionary Approach..that seems to really work

I don’t know how long its been since you came down the path from kiddyball to HS ball to college ball to the pros, but I can tell you that what’s normal now in HS is the same thing it was 10 years ago when my son went through it. Its manifested in players seldom having a lot of control over their own destinies, especially pitchers.

Of course a lot depends on the situation, where smaller schools and less populous areas give players a bit more flexibility in their playing decisions. But for a great many pitchers, once you’ve demonstrated you’re one of the best pitchers on a HS team, chances are, the “PO” label isn’t far away.

To be sure, there are a good many very good HS pitchers who also play other positions regularly as well as regularly hit, but chances are, it ain’t gonna happen. In the smaller schools or where there isn’t a lot of competition, it’s a lot more likely to happen, but in a school like ours where there’s literally 2 very good players at every position, and at least 5 or 6 well above “average” pitchers, a decision has to be made.

That decision is, unless we’re talking about “The Natural” who was the best at everything he did on the field, there isn’t enough time available to get to, and then to maintain a degree of competence high enough to be a “2 way” regular. The reason most will opt to the pitching side, is that there’s a lot less requirements for a pitcher than a position player.

By that I mean. a pitcher can be short, tall, fat, skinny, a great athlete or a relatively poor one, someone who can run like the wind or who can’t get out of his own way. IOW, a lot of players can only be seriously considered for a few positions anyway, and there’s a good chance they wouldn’t be the best at them.

A good example would be a LH thrower. He’s only gonna be seriously considered for the 3 outfield positions, 1st base, and pitching. Chances are, there will be more players contending for that 1st base spot than any other, and if he isn’t fleet of foot, he’s even limited to which OF spot he’d be put in. On the other hand, there aren’t a lot of coaches who don’t want LH pitchers, as long as they can get the ball someplace near the plate.

My point is, unlike kiddyball where kids can literally play anywhere, the competition is a lot stiffer and therefore much more difficult once the kids get to HS. Even though it would be better for everyone, I don’t see it as something where there’s a lot of choice involved.

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I agre 100% about specializing in HS. That’s what I did in the 8th grade when I dropped basketball and everything else to do soccer (fall) and baseball (winter, spring, summer). The winter was all about weight lifting and throwing and basketball was a distraction.

We’re totally on the same page.

But, I’m talking about kids specializing at 8-9 years old. I see it happening here in my own Minor Little LEague and Little LEague. At this age, I think it’s too young…

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]Score -

I agre 100% about specializing in HS. That’s what I did in the 8th grade when I dropped basketball and everything else to do soccer (fall) and baseball (winter, spring, summer). The winter was all about weight lifting and throwing and basketball was a distraction.

We’re totally on the same page.

But, I’m talking about kids specializing at 8-9 years old. I see it happening here in my own Minor Little LEague and Little LEague. At this age, I think it’s too young…[/quote]

I guess I better make sure I have you define specialization. Are you talking about being devoted to one sport, or being devoted to playing only 1 or 2 positions on the field? The latter was what I was referring to, but the former definitely has its issues as well.

I think a lot of the specializing can also depend on the coaches of the 8 and 9 year olds. Coaches should encourage young players to adapt to any position, and not “specialize” in one position until later in their baseball career (possibly high-school).

I’m talking about specializing sports and specializing positions. For example, when parents contact me that their 8-year-old pitcher has stopped playing all other sports/positions and just pitches and wants instruction because “he wants to be a MLB player more than anything” … Always makes me cringe a little. I just think there’s a lot of benefit from playing multiple positions and multiple sports through 13-14 years old, when things start getting meaningfully competitive.

What are some rewards of playing multiple sports?
:?: