Video of my mechanics


#1

Well I have video of myself throwing from last February, unfortunately our video camera is broken so I can’t get updated video. However, I haven’t made any conscious mechanical tweaks.

Video from perpendicular angle:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6786894939333565897

Video of front angle, a bit off the centerline though:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7961161290051816392

(If there’s a more productive means to post video for viewing let me know)

Thanks for the help, I feel like I could make a tweak to get a touch more velocity on the ball, I have pleased with velocity, and my control has been solid this year (I believe 12 walks in around 48 innings with 2 hit batters).

Oh and no true arm problems in my career, and usually not very sore after I pitch :-).


#2

It appears you don’t get much separation between hips and shoulders. Try to delay your shoulder rotation as long as possible. That should add some velocity. But you’ll need to keep from pulling the glove too early or you’ll open up the shoulders too early. In other words, your glove side needs to give you the timing you need to keep the shoulders closed longer.


#3

What does separation between hips and shoulders really mean?


#4

That’s a good question. Sometimes we use terminology so much that we assume everyone else understands it too. My bad.

Separation of hips and shoulders means rotating the hips and shoulders in opposite directions - putting some distance between the front hip and the back shoulder.

Near the end of your stride, your front hips start to open and square up to the target. If you’re getting good separation and delaying your shoulder rotation then, while your hips are opening up, your shoulders are staying closed and possibly even rotating (aka “torquing”) away from the target until such time that they rotate back towards the target to deliver the arm, hand, and ball. Sometimes you hear people talking about “stretching the rubberband” - what they’re talking about is stretching the core muscles during separation of hips and shoulders. You stretch them out before letting them contract to rotate the shoulders so that you can rotate the shoulders in as explosive a manner as possible. This is where most of your velocity comes from.


#5

Check out this page on my web site…

It is full of pictures like these…


#6

It’s hard to tell for sure without being able to go frame by frame through the clip, but I think I agree.


#7

what should I do so you can get the file frame by frame?

I’ve got the regular file sitting on my desktop, just let me know what I should do with it.


#8

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Check out this page on my web site…

[/quote]
Chris, you have a typo on that page. The first occurence of “shoulders” should instead be “hips”. :slight_smile:


#9

Alright, I would agree I am seeing that as well. And I would think that alone could help me get a nice boost of velocity.

Does anything come to mind to work on letting the hips go first, or is that just something I will need to work on consciously until it becomes subconscious?


#10

You need to work on it consciously until it becomes subconscious.


#11

Get this made into a poster…

and put that on your wall :wink:


#12

I’m not sure, I think I’m creating torque but just not to the degree that say Kazmir is. It’s hard because I don’t have a definate center point cause I’m in shorts, and the video gets blurry during rapid movement.

I was watching this again because I was trying to work on this and all that was really happening was my hips were flying open my arm was late and the ball sailed with a heavy tail on it. This was a problem of mine over the winter and I had it fixed, in doing so I may have lost some torque though?
Any thoughts, opinions?/


#13

[quote=“centerfield2150”]what should I do so you can get the file frame by frame? I’ve got the regular file sitting on my desktop, just let me know what I should do with it.[/quote]What format is the video you have? Can you please send it to me at dm-59@hotmail.com. It really makes a difference if we can see it frame by frame.

All of the advice so far has been about hip / shoulder separation. I don’t see a big problem there but the advice is still good. I’m going to add something that I believe is the biggest power robber you have. That is your arm action is inhibiting your ability to get to “full external rotation” with your throwing side upper arm (humerus). This is where the forearm has gotten to a point where it is laid back, horizontal as your shoulders square to the target. Chris O’Leary often speaks of Mike Marshall’s “reverse forearm bounce” with respect to this. I disagree with the term “bounce” here because, done well, it “loops” back, down, around, up, forward and on in a smooth, fluid motion, and is not a jerky “bounce”.

This is one of the most common problem I see in developing pitchers. The result is sort of a “push” with the arm rather than a whip. An extreme description of this is a “shot put” kind of throw. It’s very difficult to generate your maximum velocity without doing this well.

I’m eternally frustrated by not being able to post video directly here but, if you send me your email address, I’ll send some very good MLB videos of what this looks like and some thoughts on how to get there. It’s not easy to get there though. It takes a lot of work and patience.

The issue with your arm action that is causing difficulty in this regard is how you take the ball down and then, as it stays down there, you take it back behind your body (toward 1st base in your case as a righty). Then, and here’s where frame by frame would help, the hand / ball overtake the elbow on the way up. This path makes it very difficult to get any whip on it.

My suggestion is to stop swinging the ball down and back with the straight arm you exhibit. It’s fine to straighten out on the break from the glove, just get the elbow bent early and lift straight up with the back of the forearm, thumb under the ball. The hand should not overtake the elbow on the way up until the entire arm is horizontally oriented at shoulder height. Then the ball continues it’s arc up and back. If this is done with the proper timing, the shoulders and elbow being fired at front foot landing, the result is the looping action I spoke of. This is incredibly difficult to describe in words.


#14

OK. Let’s try this. On this site, I have “albums” showing Nolan Ryan’s entire delivery from an oblique angle. It shows the arm action I spoke of, somewhat. Note how the ball doesn’t really go behind the body until it goes past “high cocked”. Then it loops as I described in my previous post. Also note the bend in the elbow, early.

I also show an album of Clemens that is the best I’ve seen yet of the loop (NOT a bounce) at the top.

http://pitchingnut.spaces.msn.com/personalspace.aspx?_c01_blogpart=myspace&_c02_owner=1&_c=blogpart


#15

Ok it seem’s to me what Chris is saying is true. But I’m noticing something different from what a pitcher from around this area told me who throws mid 90’s. Of course he’s 6’1" and 280-295 pounds. But back to the point. I paused your video and saw when at your full stride, your jerking your head just a little. The pitcher here, (Josh Cornett), was telling me I have that same problem. And he told me that if I keep my head still I would gain a couple MPH. I also noticed that with your left foot, your striding it close to the ground. Which is very decieving to a batter, it will make you lose a couple MPH. That is just what he told me, and he throws some good heat, like I said, lower to mid 90’s. And since I started doing what he told me, I gained velocity and had better control on breaking pitches, and more accuracy in pitch location.

I’m not saying your wrong Chris, I’m ust trying to help out a little bit :slight_smile: And get back to me if you think what I said is true too.


#16

[quote=“Roger”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Check out this page on my web site…

[/quote]
Chris, you have a typo on that page. The first occurence of “shoulders” should instead be “hips”. :)[/quote]

Fixed. Thanks.


#17

[quote=“centerfield2150”]Alright, I would agree I am seeing that as well. And I would think that alone could help me get a nice boost of velocity.

Does anything come to mind to work on letting the hips go first, or is that just something I will need to work on consciously until it becomes subconscious?[/quote]

What I’ve found that works is to concentrate on striding sideways as long as possible. You only flip your glove side foot around (so that your toe faces the target) at the last possible second.

While that is happening, you have to also concentrate on keeping your shoulders sideways to the target and not let them be pulled around until you can’t hold them back any longer.


#18

Dm59: I just sent you an email with the videos attached,

Thanks for your suggestions thus far.

Chris: Can I get your email to send you the file to see it frame by frame?


#19

Thanks for the point on external rotation, I’m seeing (my lack of) it, hopefully that mean I’m actually leaving a lot of velocity on the table as of yet because really the more I look at the video of my motion my arm is really only along for the ride and has little whip.


#20

thepainguy@gmail.com