Video of my mechanics, please critique


#1

Here is a video of my mechanics, it isnt the greatest angle and doesnt show much of a variety of pitches. I wasnt aware this forum was around, next tournament in 2 weeks palm springs I will get some new/better video and post it up as well.

Please critique my mechanics and give an approximation of velocity ( I understand this is very hard to do, but I have NO idea as fast as numbers )

Thank you, will be checking back and replying as well.


#2

you look pretty good to me… really nice mound presence. Like that focused stare you got out there.

Sorry I don’t have any mechanical tips for you.


#3

mike if you have aol/aim mine is jay21328 and i would love to tlk to you about your mechanics ok. You have overall very good mechanics. PLEASE CONTACT ME THROUGH AIM AT Jay21328 OR EMAIL AT jay21328@aol.com


#4

It’s hard to tell much from the one angle but I think I notice the following things:

(1) You appear to stride to the closed side and then throw back across your body.

(2) It kind of looks like you throw with mostly your arm and not as much with your body as you could.

I think you might benefit from starting your hips forward sooner and building up more momentum. Lead with the hip. Head and shoulders shouls stay mostly upright but slightly behind the front hip into foot strike. Make sure you maintain your same knee lift. The result of this should be getting into foot strike quicker and possibly striding a bit further.

These adjustments will commit your weight toward the target sooner causing you to stride more directly toward the target. It will also create more energy allowing you to throw just as hard or even harder while using your body to do so. Plus, it will fix your timing and keep you from falling off to the side like in the first pitch in your video.

Another adjustment you could make for the striding closed thing is to start on the left side of the rubber. This will minimize how big of a corner you have to turn to get the shoulders squared up to the target.

Finally, in your next video, make sure we can see your feet. And, if possible, use a tripod or some stationary object to set the camera on so the video doesn’t jump all over the place.


#5

good pickup by Roger there… it does look as if he could plant his lead foot sooner… it seems like he’s got good momentum as he first starts to bring it down, but then it sort of hangs there low above the ground while he opens his hips. He’s got a nice leg kick and comes down with some nice power, but it’s almost like he pauses or takes a beat before explosing with his upper body rotations. He slows down his momentum, right? It’s not a huge flaw, but it’s there as far as I can see.

However, by my eyes, he does meet another important checkpoint people are into here and that’s that his shoulder rotation is timed pretty nicely, following the lead of his hips. So while he may be losing momentum before shoulder rotation, the shoulder rotation itself is timed well. And I don’t think that’s contradictory, is it?


#6

Yeah, the knee lift looks fine but then he does appear to slow down a bit. I suppose it could just be the camera angle. But I also base my comment on how upright he seems to be throughout his delivery. His front leg never gets much of a bend in it. His stride is proobably a bit short.

I’d really like to see a side view to analyze hips and shoulders. I’d also want to look at whether or not his head and shoulders are getting out front a bit too much.


#7

[quote=“Roger”]It’s hard to tell much from the one angle but I think I notice the following things:

(1) You appear to stride to the closed side and then throw back across your body.

(2) It kind of looks like you throw with mostly your arm and not as much with your body as you could.

I think you might benefit from starting your hips forward sooner and building up more momentum. Lead with the hip. Head and shoulders shouls stay mostly upright but slightly behind the front hip into foot strike. Make sure you maintain your same knee lift. The result of this should be getting into foot strike quicker and possibly striding a bit further.

These adjustments will commit your weight toward the target sooner causing you to stride more directly toward the target. It will also create more energy allowing you to throw just as hard or even harder while using your body to do so. Plus, it will fix your timing and keep you from falling off to the side like in the first pitch in your video.

Another adjustment you could make for the striding closed thing is to start on the left side of the rubber. This will minimize how big of a corner you have to turn to get the shoulders squared up to the target.

Finally, in your next video, make sure we can see your feet. And, if possible, use a tripod or some stationary object to set the camera on so the video doesn’t jump all over the place.[/quote]

First of all I want to thank you all for your responces, I’m honestly overwhelmed with how directly on target I think most of what you have to say is. I will respond to each accordingly.

Roger,

  1. Every pitching lesson I’ve ever taken (5+ years ago) we spent the mojority of the time trying to correct the fact that my stride is about 4-6 inches to the right (closed side). Its always been very uncomfortable because I’ve had to open up very early it seemed. I’ve tried “falling off” which was just a lean towards the plate starting with the leg kick, but it always felt out of control, although helped with the right side stride issue. From what I understand about your technique it would look more like Nomo’s leading with the hip to drive to the plate. I’ll experiment with this the next time a throw a bullpen.

I like your mention of moving to the left side of the rubber, the plate has always seemed larger pitching from that side to me, and I’ve always felt more comfortable throwing inside from there as well. It’s been drilled into my head so hard that I need to be on the inside of the rubber I’ve never considered staying left. I never put the two together that my stride would be the cause of the different feel on the left side.

I’ll work on a few angles, side 3/4 and possibly behind the plate this weekend for the next video.

I have another full 2-3 innings or so somewhere from the footage I showed you all, I think its still on the camera. I’ll take a look at it and see if there is any footage thats more on the steady side and possibly have a full frame view.


#8

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]good pickup by Roger there… it does look as if he could plant his lead foot sooner… it seems like he’s got good momentum as he first starts to bring it down, but then it sort of hangs there low above the ground while he opens his hips. He’s got a nice leg kick and comes down with some nice power, but it’s almost like he pauses or takes a beat before explosing with his upper body rotations. He slows down his momentum, right? It’s not a huge flaw, but it’s there as far as I can see.

However, by my eyes, he does meet another important checkpoint people are into here and that’s that his shoulder rotation is timed pretty nicely, following the lead of his hips. So while he may be losing momentum before shoulder rotation, the shoulder rotation itself is timed well. And I don’t think that’s contradictory, is it?[/quote]

Another point that hit pretty close to home, after reading what you saw and looking at the video I completely agree that I’m slowing most of the momentum from my leg kick with that pause. I went through a couple windups here in the room, and about half of my stride length is the foot gliding across the floor, after its come down and paused. It seems like two parts to the delivery, when I try to lose the pause my arm drags behind pretty badly…until I lead with my hip like roger recommended. I think its going to take some getting used to the timing with my arm, but I do feel that I really really need to get my lower half more involved. If I had to make an estimate from how my delivery feels I would say I’m using 80% upper body, I’m sure thats a little backwards.

I havent read up on shoulder rotation much, but I can imagine if I can produce more power/momentum with my lower half by leading with the hip and losing the pause it would help promote a stronger shoulder rotation and ultimately more power overall…something I can live with.


#9

Yeah, the knee lift looks fine but then he does appear to slow down a bit. I suppose it could just be the camera angle. But I also base my comment on how upright he seems to be throughout his delivery. His front leg never gets much of a bend in it. His stride is proobably a bit short.

I’d really like to see a side view to analyze hips and shoulders. I’d also want to look at whether or not his head and shoulders are getting out front a bit too much.[/quote]

My stride is a bit short compared to just about every other pitcher I’ve thrown with during games…It seems I’m always landing short of their “hole.” And I’ve always been told that I look like I’m throwing standing straight up. I attribute this to the lack of forward momentum/drive, as well as the short stride. After reading these posts it has become glaringly obvious that I REALLY need to produce more forward momentum, and get my lower half involved in a strong way.

I am a bit on the skinny side, 6’0" 155lbs, so I don’t exactly have a lot of weight to be throwing around up there anyway lol

I sprained my ankle (right foot) a few months ago, and came back when things were still a bit tender. I think thats where I developed the lack of lower half to this extreme. Its always been like that, but lately I’ve been having a hard time getting my release points out in front and getting good movement on the fastballs. I’ve also noticed its increasingly difficult to stay on top of the breaking ball release points earlier in games, which I think has something to do with my lack of forward momentum turning my delivery into more of a slinging of the ball.

I’m going to spend this week working on these things and try to implement them into my delivery for the tournament this week, and I’ll be sure to get some footage.

once again, I really appreciate the comments and ideas. I am very surprised how precise they are, from just that little clip.


#10

You don’t want to fall off or have an inappropriate posture change in order to get your shoulders back online with the target after having strided offline from the target because that will mess with your release point. And striding to the closed side will prevent you from getting full hip rotation relative to the where the shoulders will square up to.

Now, striding 4"-6" to the closed side isn’t that bad so adjusting your starting position on the rubber might work for you. So I would try that first - especially since it’s a very benign adjustment in that you really don’t have to try to do anything different. But if that doesn’t work, another way to get yourself to stride straight to the target (without just trying to change your stride) is to get your hips going sooner and faster and in the right direction. Once your weight is commited in one direction, it’s tough to change directions so all you need to do is make sure you get your hips going directly at your target and you won’t be able to stride any other direction. This is a nice adjustment because in addition to all of the good things that getting the hips going provides, it’s an adjustment you make early in your delivery.

Here’s how to make this adjustment. Draw a line from the center of the rubber towards the center of home plate. Call this the centerline. Pitch using your normal starting position on the rubber. Look at the drag line created in the dirt by your back foot. Assuming your drag line ends somewhere off to the closed side of the centerline, move your starting position to the left by a distance equal to the distance between the end of your drag line and the centerline. The goal is to get your drag line to end on the centerline. Striding onto the centerline lets youturn a smaller corner than striding away from the centerline.

Now, you may find you don’t have a drag line because your foot lifts off the ground instead of dragging and then lifting. I think this is a possibility because I thought you looked rather upright with a possibly short stride. If this is the case, it may also be an indicator that your upper body is getting out front too soon and that would also cause you to throw more with just the arm. In this case, your adjustment on the rubber will have to be a guess. But getting the hips going and possibly starting with the knees bent more while maintaining your knee lift will help you build more momentum and strech out your stride. And these things might result in a drag line.


#11

yeah, I struggle with striding to the right too. It’s a bi**h


#12

Here is some additional footage from the same day that shows some more of the footwork, and a few different pitches. Some are from the first few innings and by the way my mechanics kinda fell apart it looks like some of the latter parts of the game too…(unless it was a loooooong inning lol)

Roger, a drag line exists, but I’ve noticed since the ankle injury a few months ago its definately alot shorter and more of an arc instead of a line towards the plate. Again, I’ll get some more video this weekend with better angles, more footage and more stable.


#13

While the length and direction of the drag line can be an indicator of mechanical efficiency, what’s most important is where the drag line ends. The only thing you’ll want to do regarding the drag line is get it to end on the center line by changing your starting position on the rubber. Otherwise, don’t try to arbitrarily lengthen it or change its direction.

Remember that the drag line is a result of your mechanics. As such, it gives you feedback. But it is not a goal. Changing (improving) your mechanics should be the goal and doing so might change your drag line.


#14

i agree with what roger said about the throwing acrossed your body, but all in all very nice mechanics, relexed and totally focused haha good job


#15

Direction is largely determined by your back foot. Premature weight transfer is also a big factor. Try setting/angling the back toe in front of the heel. Keep your weight on the inside portion of your foot with your knee also inside the foot. Try to send your knee directly toward the plate. Think of keeping your back knee under your back hip as long as possible throughout your delivery. That is a cue, not what actually happens most times, but has been very succesful for helping pitchers understand the concept. A lot of people will disagree with me, but so what. It is important to try things and figure out for yourself what works best. Let the feel of your arm make your decisions.