Velocity LHP


#1

I know this has been addressed many times throughout this website and many others but I’m having issues. I’m a 15 year old , left-handed pitcher. I’m 5’6 , 135 lb and I throw about 65-69 normally and 70-75 on a good day. I guess my movement makes up for it since it tails a lot like a two-seam. My location is fine but I’ll definitely keep trying to improve that but for right now, I’m worried about velocity. I know I’m young and velocity comes with growing but am I pitching too slow for my age?


#2

Right now I’d be more worried on why you have a 6mph difference between a normal day and a good day. On a good day I may only see a 1 to 2 mph difference. I’m sure your motion could use a lot of work (they always do or else you wouldn’t be posting about improving velocity) so post a video, then come ask us some questions on getting better, there’s no magic bullet…


#3

I think it may be a confidence thing. When I’m confident, I genuinely throw harder. I normally do well no matter the velocity but there is always room for improvement. Also, how do you feel about a knuckleball?


#4

That is a big jump between your average day and a good day.

You need to realise what your doing when you’re throwing 70+ and make sure your doing that every time out.

Scrap the KBall focus on your FB/CU


#5

If you want to be good at throwing hard, you have to throw hard. Any amount of time focused in any other direction takes away from this goal.


#6

When I throw harder, consistently reaching 70+, my arm will definitely be sore after about 4-7 innings pitched. Any recommendation on that? I guess changing speeds would help my arm as well as confuse the hitter.


#7

What’s your arm slot? :?:


#8

High 3/4.


#9

You know, that could be part of your problem—and the reason your arm gets sore after pitching. That arm slot might not be the most comfortable for you. Would you consider dropping down a bit, to a straight 3/4, neither high nor low? That would probably take some of the pressure off your arm and shoulder, and at that angle you might not have to think so much about your mechanics and concentrate more on just throwing the ball. Also, you really need a good changeup, and I would suggest you try a palmball (what is often referred to as the “Bugs Bunny” change). That is one of the easiest on your arm, because you throw it with a fastball motion; you grip it with all four fingers on top and the thumb underneath, well back in the palm of your hand—but don’t grip it too tightly, because you don’t want to squeeze the juice out of it! And the most important thing is to relax, let your arm lead the way and the rest of your body catch up with it. Too many pitchers do it bass-ackwards, and therein lies the problem.
You might even consider getting closer to the sidearm delivery, which is by far the easiest on the arm and the shoulder. Maybe hyou’d lose a little speed but would gain much better control and command. Think about these things, give them a try and see if one or the other might work for you. :slight_smile:


#10

[quote=“Zita Carno”]You know, that could be part of your problem—and the reason your arm gets sore after pitching. That arm slot might not be the most comfortable for you. Would you consider dropping down a bit, to a straight 3/4, neither high nor low? That would probably take some of the pressure off your arm and shoulder, and at that angle you might not have to think so much about your mechanics and concentrate more on just throwing the ball. Also, you really need a good changeup, and I would suggest you try a palmball (what is often referred to as the “Bugs Bunny” change). That is one of the easiest on your arm, because you throw it with a fastball motion; you grip it with all four fingers on top and the thumb underneath, well back in the palm of your hand—but don’t grip it too tightly, because you don’t want to squeeze the juice out of it! And the most important thing is to relax, let your arm lead the way and the rest of your body catch up with it. Too many pitchers do it bass-ackwards, and therein lies the problem.
You might even consider getting closer to the sidearm delivery, which is by far the easiest on the arm and the shoulder. Maybe hyou’d lose a little speed but would gain much better control and command. Think about these things, give them a try and see if one or the other might work for you. :)[/quote]

I feel like I throw harder when I do an over the top release but I heard that makes you more prone to injury. :cry:


#11

Exactly! And that is why I suggested that you drop down to at least a normal 3/4. The straight overhand is actually the most unnatural arm slot, and how pitchers get away with it I will never understand. (I was a natural, honest-to-gosh sidearmer in my playing days, and I never had any arm problems.) So give it a try and see what happens. 8)


#12

Thanks. :slight_smile: I have about 7-8 months of reaching my goal of throwing 75mph sophomore spring season. As I said, I sit at 68-70. Anyway on increasing that? I started weight lifting if that makes a difference.


#13

There are lots of variables that go into velocity increases.
First and IMO foremost you need to have mechanics that will allow you to progress.
Weightlifting is great if you’re doing the right exercises, focus on leg strength and core strength.
Very important also is to throw, throw, and throw some more. Not pitching, throwing. Whether it be a game of catch, flat ground sessions, long toss, and bullpens throw with intent to throw hard.