Velo by Age


#1

After reading the 70 mph 10 year old thread, I figured I’d go back through my notes on my own kid that I’ve kept over the years. Not sure if this helps anyone or not, but these are his top velocities by age (either in a bullpen or in a game–that he hit during that age). Your mileage obviously may vary. Guns ranged from a Bushnell in the early years to a Pocket Radar to a Stalker in the last several years.

5 years 41 mph
6 years 44 mph
7 years 49 mph
8 years 53 mph
9 years 59 mph
10 years 62 mph
11 years 66 mph
12 years 70 mph
13 years 75 mph
14 years 81 mph
15 years 87 mph
16 years 91 mph (still time to increase, since he’s a Jan birthday)


#2

Did you have the pocket radar ball coach, or the regular pocket radar… And how much more do you like the stalker??


#3

I had the regular pocket radar but traded it in for the ball coach model. The ball coach model is 1000x better. The old PR was terrible for baseball.

The stalker is a good bit better for getting velo at games or places where you’re not close to the action (300’ range vs 90’, I think). The stalker also gives you piece of mind that you’re getting accurate results, since it’s the gold standard. But all that being said, the Ball Coach Pocket Radar is plenty accurate, convenient and good enough for most uses.


#4

I was planning on the ball coach for next year, because it’s small, affordable, and reasonably accurate. Can keep it in my pocket and check velocity differential between fastball and change up In the bull pen and spot check during games… Will figure out if I need a stalker later…


#5

Got the pocket radar ball coach… just wrapping up wrestling season getting ready for baseball and starting to throw a little… Looking forward to working on 2 seam, 4 seam, change and perhaps a sinker and the process of learning to throw a change 6-8 mph slower than his 4 seam… and then him learning when to use it… last year started to throw a little of a change with a wide 2 seam grip, and decided to break it out up 0-2 to a kid who couldn’t catch up to his fastball… went over the fence for the only run he allowed… excited to watch him figure it all out:-)


#6

Have him learn the circle change. It is difficult to learn, takes a lot of practice and bad throws, but will pay off. Have him throw it in warm ups and long toss. My son started with the circle change when he was in Little League (actually a “C change” due to hands being too small back then - index and thumb forming a “C” for a lefty instead of index crossed over thumb). Now as a Freshman in high school he throws the full circle change and it is really paying off. I once read that MLB pitchers were asked what pitch they did not throw that they wish they did, and the circle change was top of the list!


#7

Started working on the circle change… Pocket Radar Ball Coach puts his fastball topping out in the low 70’s… figure he probably cruises during games in upper 60’s… working on a low 60’s circle change, but for now just having him throw it to try and get comfortable with it, into the net at home, and during warm ups and long toss, learning to throw it comfortably, and learning to control it… throwing as hard as he does I’m thinking that if he can get a decent change up developed over the next year or two, he’s going to only increase his effectiveness.