Urgent! please help!

Ok, first of all thanks for taking the time to view this post.
Now, I can throw a screwball, I have been told to stop throwing it and throw the circle change instead. I love my screwball and I use it all the time. It always finds the strikezone. The problem is that it only moves slightly and usually gets wacked a long way usually in a gap. And I tried throwing my circle change but I really can’t keep control of it. But because it uses the same arm motion as my screwball it is like second nature to throw it. Which leads me to believe that the lack of control isn’t in my arm, its in my fingers.
So I really need to know how to get the MOST out of my screwball, the most movement etc.
And also if someone could explain to me how to throw a cirlce change so I can gain control of it and use it in a game. My first game is this weekend on Saturday.
Thanks for your time.

~TIM~

[quote=“the_great_one42”]I love my screwball and I use it all the time. It always finds the strikezone. The problem is that it only moves slightly and usually gets wacked a long way usually in a gap. [/quote]So, with these results, why do you love this pitch so much?

Secondly, the circle change is very hard to control, initially. It takes a lot of time. There’s no quick fix for it that I know of. It’s about throwing it, often. You’ll eventually get it.

If you need a changeup fast, try a box change and concentrate on the middle and ring fingers throwing the ball. It’s easier to control but doesn’t quite get as much movement as you do with a circle.

When it works it works unbelievably though, I love it because no one else throws it in my league, it makes me unique. It defines me from the other pitchers because they cant throw it. And plus it was the first pitch I developed after my fastball. I started throwing my screball about a year BEFORE my curveball.
Personal preference though, no one told me to throw it.

dm59 offers you a great “first thought” on the screwball you’re throwing.

You may be the only one in your league that can throw (assuming that you are throwing it correctly), but you may aslo - depending on your age - be one of the first pitchers in your league to end your career.

Why? While the screwball is certainly an effective pitch (who could argue with the success of Carl Hubbell or Fernando Valenzuela, both of whom threw it anywhere from 50 to 100 times a game), you must equally understand that it is one of the most harmful pitches you can throw since it exerts tremendous pressure on the shoulder and elbow joints of the throwing arm. The mechanics of it require you to reverse everything you learned about throwing the curveball (which is in itself a fairly tough pitch to master).

Considering your past success with it, and remembering the negative physical* effects it can have on a prolonged career, take dm59’s suggestion and master the change-up. Though it will take time, your pitching “life” will be a lot longer. To explain it properly to you within this post would require several paragraphs. Pick up a copy of “Coaching Pitchers” (3rd edition) by Joe “Spanky” McFarland - open it to page 34 - and begin reading. It will also explain four other types of change-up pitches any one of which you may want to try.

*Hubbell’s arm was so bad at the end of his career that his throwing arm was twisted permanently in such a manner that when it hung beside his body, the palm of his throwing hand was facing AWAY from his body. Then again, thinking back on your last post and remembering that no other pitchers in your league could throw the screwball, your physical appearance (ala Hubbell) would certainly make you “unique”!

Seriously, in the hopes you haven’t hurt yourself already, find another pitch…and good luck on Saturday.

You have NO idea how much ive read that information over and over. Trust me, I’ve researched the screwball extensively and know the risks and how often I shud use it. What I lack is someone to actually TEACH me how to throw it.
I will work on my circle change, but my screwball will always be my favourite pitch.

[quote=“the_great_one42”]Ok, first of all thanks for taking the time to view this post.
Now, I can throw a screwball,

~TIM~[/quote]

i dont know how to throw a screwball, if its that effective i am willing to risk my career for a pitch like that, can u please teach me how to throw it?

“You may be the only one in your league that can throw (assuming that you are throwing it correctly), but you may aslo - depending on your age - be one of the first pitchers in your league to end your career. Why? While the screwball is certainly an effective pitch (who could argue with the success of Carl Hubbell or Fernando Valenzuela, both of whom threw it anywhere from 50 to 100 times a game), you must equally understand that it is one of the most harmful pitches you can throw since it exerts tremendous pressure on the shoulder and elbow joints of the throwing arm. The mechanics of it require you to reverse everything you learned about throwing the curveball (which is in itself a fairly tough pitch to master).”

The role of the screwball in causing injuries is extremely overstated. Thrown properly, it is no more injurious, and generally far less injurious than is a traditional curveball.

The reason is that to throw a screwball, you must pronate your wrist (turn the wrist counter-clockwise). This takes some of the load off of the UCL and for this and other reasons prolongs the life of the elbow. In contrast, a curveball is often thrown by supinating the wrist (turning the wrist clockwise). This is problematic because it focuses the load on the UCL and causes the bones of the elbow to slam together.

The fact that Hubbell, Valenzuela, and others who threw the screwball had arm problems has nothing to do with the screwball. Instead, it’s related to how they threw their other pitches.

If you are having problems getting your screwball to bite, it means that you aren’t getting enough spin on the ball. That could be related to weakness in your fingers, wrist, and/or forearm. If you are older than 17, then it might make sense for you to do some light weightlifting and/or training with weighted balls.

I could only teach you how to throw it if I knew exactly how to get the most out of it. And I dont undofortunately. I know how to throw it but getting it to bite as much as I want it to is a different story.
The screwball is the opposite to a curveball. Instead of having your wrist on the outside like a curve, you have to turn your wrist inwards (counterclockwise) as you release the ball, also the underside of your arm should be turned away from your body when you release. It is throw slower than a curveball but only just. Aim for low an inside. Its good against leftys but think twice for rightys. The ball should curve down and inside for right handed batters.
if theres anything else you want to know just holla

The person you ought to ask is Dr. Mike Marshall - www.drmikemarshall.com.

He won the NL Cy Young in 1974 and it was one of the key pitches in his toolbox.

When I was working with an absolutely incredible pitching coach—he was an active major league pitcher—he told me he threw the screwball, but not exclusively, and he mentioned what had happened to Carl Hubbell. When he asked me if I threw the screwball, and I told him no, I didn’t, he said “Good for you. You don’t need it.” And indeed I didn’t; I threw a lot of snake jazz, including a knuckle-curve, a circle change, a couple of variations of the curve, and a very nasty slider—my strikeout pitch.
I don’t know why so many pitchers become enamored of a pitch that can only mess up your arm! There are so many pitches to throw that will not screw up your arm, no pun intended. My advice is to stay away from that one.

and if it doesnt bit why throw it if it dont move its just a slow FB