University of Southern Maine in season Nutrition pamphlet

http://usm.maine.edu/athletics/Baseball/baseball.pdf

USM which is regularly in the DIII college world series and would beat most of the division I schools in the Maryland area has this in season nutrition pamphlet which i think is vital to ball players.

As a college player who is on the road for 3-4 months in a 56 game schedule it is easy to eat poorly.

Just though i would share and would love to hear what you guys think.

I thought that I should let everyone know what the nutrition plan is for Queens College (NY). This isnt for everyone, but it works for me and my partner in the weightroom and the rotation. It is as follows:

Morning:
Meal Bar or cereal or sometimes nothing

Lunch (Post throwing and running practice Pre weight lifting):
Taco Bell / Da Deli / Tozt (healthy sandwich salad place

Immediately before workout:
Jack3d and about 16 oz water in total
Take a doody

Immediately after Workout:
Protein Shake

Dinner:
Whatever we can find in the freshman’s room, usually grilled chicken and whole milk

Late night:
Beer and either mcdonalds or taco bell again (mcdonalds if we had TB for lunch and TB if we had deli)

I think that this represents a more realistic nutrition plan of most college athletes. It isnt horrible as long as we take the running and lifting serious.

Brian,

Thanks for being honest :lol:

And you are absolutely right when you say McDonalds and Taco Bell aren’t inherently bad for you. There are plenty of options you can get at both places that are fine, and I don’t mean the grilled chicken sandwiches. Hamburgers and tacos and whatever are fine if you need the calories, which many youth athletes do.

Probably should stay away from the french fries and other empty calories like beer and sugar-filled sodas, though…

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]http://usm.maine.edu/athletics/Baseball/baseball.pdf

USM which is regularly in the DIII college world series and would beat most of the division I schools in the Maryland area has this in season nutrition pamphlet which i think is vital to ball players.

As a college player who is on the road for 3-4 months in a 56 game schedule it is easy to eat poorly.

Just though i would share and would love to hear what you guys think.[/quote]

pretty rudimentary, but I can see why it would be difficult to get college students to eat well. Just getting them to stop drinking soda and eating fries is a huge step in and of itself.

"I thought that I should let everyone know what the nutrition plan is for Queens College (NY). This isnt for everyone, but it works for me and my partner in the weightroom and the rotation. It is as follows:

Morning:
Meal Bar or cereal or sometimes nothing

Lunch (Post throwing and running practice Pre weight lifting):
Taco Bell / Da Deli / Tozt (healthy sandwich salad place

Immediately before workout:
Jack3d and about 16 oz water in total
Take a doody

Immediately after Workout:
Protein Shake

Dinner:
Whatever we can find in the freshman’s room, usually grilled chicken and whole milk

Late night:
Beer and either mcdonalds or taco bell again (mcdonalds if we had TB for lunch and TB if we had deli)

I think that this represents a more realistic nutrition plan of most college athletes. It isnt horrible as long as we take the running and lifting serious."

:? I understand this is more representative of what a college athlete actually eats but are you tricking yourself into thinking this is actually a good diet?? how many calories are you getting daily? What’s your body fat %?

It isn’t necessary in baseball to have a body fat % of 9-12% or whatever the current agreed ideal body fat % is.

Lanky you’re pretty critical in every post of yours, is anything ever good enough for you?

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]It isn’t necessary in baseball to have a body fat % of 9-12% or whatever the current agreed ideal body fat % is.

Lanky you’re pretty critical in every post of yours, is anything ever good enough for you?[/quote]

my impression was that you started a thread asking for people’s opinions, not trying to get others to agree with you.

When I see somebody post a diet that consists of practically no breakfast, very little fruit/veggies, fast food up to twice a day and beer, I’m allowed to state my opinion.

Will it have a significant effect on performance? Maybe not, but that doesn’t mean it’s a good diet.

Of course I understand how difficult it must be to eat healthy in college, and I’m not bashing the guy who posted this for his eating habits. What I disagree with is the assertion that this diet is “fine” because it “works” for him.

As far as I’m concerned, the terms “good enough” and “fine” are useless. I don’t look to improve my diet or my training or my mechanics until they are simply “good enough” --but that’s just my personal bias :lol:

No matter what nutritional guidelines you follow, breakfast is the most important meal of the day for active baseball players. As one of the other members stated above, it concerns me, too, when breakfast is just a breakfast bar or nothing at all. Remember, good calories are the building blocks of muscle. You can work your butt off int he weight room, but if you’re not eating enough (or eating the right things), you’re wasting your time!! Make time for breakfast!

It’s not that I am looking for people to agree or disagree or anything, you just have this way of coming off very condescending in a good amount of your posts.

"When I see somebody post a diet that consists of practically no breakfast, very little fruit/veggies, fast food up to twice a day and beer, I’m allowed to state my opinion.

Will it have a significant effect on performance? Maybe not, but that doesn’t mean it’s a good diet.

Of course I understand how difficult it must be to eat healthy in college, and I’m not bashing the guy who posted this for his eating habits. What I disagree with is the assertion that this diet is “fine” because it “works” for him. "

maybe i gave the wrong impression. i was not trying to say that not eating breakfast and drinking beer and eating fast food are working for me and i reccomend it. I am sure that these things are slowing me down, HOWEVER certain things are inevitable in the life of a college student. If you have class at 8am and dont have time to eat breakfast, should you not work hard that day? i say no. If your last class ends at 230 and practice is at 315 and u only have $3 should you not eat at all? i say you eat fast food. If you team is going out to celebrate a win and you drink, does that mean take the next day off? I think that while you should try to limit the amount of poor nutrition you put into your body, if you do fall into eating badly for any reason that should not stop you from working as hard as you can during the small amount of free time that you have.

And when I say works for me, i dont mean that i am in world class shape, but i have gone from a 235lb freshman to a 195 lb senior who maxed out on squats at 500lbs and does reps with 405. That is not becuase of my nutrition, but it was still possible in spite of it

It’s all relative to how much attention you pay to your baseball “life”. If you are 100% (and I don’t use this term loosely; I’ve seen 0 people in my life who are actually 100% commited to baseball) commited, then you realize how nutrition pays off on the field and weight room, and you exploit any advantage you have.

Like Lanky said, you choose how good you want to be.

[quote=“qcbaseball”]

And when I say works for me, i dont mean that i am in world class shape, but i have gone from a 235lb freshman to a 195 lb senior who maxed out on squats at 500lbs and does reps with 405. That is not becuase of my nutrition, but it was still possible in spite of it[/quote]

I think this is a good distinction. Thanks for clarifying your initial post too.

I found this little thread quite interesting. It is a good thing to have this type of conversation about the quality of certain foods and your diet’s relationship to nutrition and its affects on baseball performance.

In my observations over 50 years of interacting with all levels of society including student athletes, I find it is extremely important what you eat. I would suggest though that it is even more important when you eat. You must create a consistent food cycle to maximize your potential in health and performance. The habits you form at your age will carrying over into your later years after baseball is over. Eating at fast food joints, skipping breakfast or drinking later in the evening just before you turn in all form life habits that will negatively affect your health significantly later.

So eat, drink and be merry the way you want today. It probably won’t be noticeable even on the baseball field but later on… be ready to make adjustments. Dang those habits are hard to break!

Dino,

Truer words have rarely been spoken. Your experience speaks volumes here.