Type of workout each day question


#1

Hey guys I was just wondering your opinion on this…What do you think is better for pitching…working on 2 specific muscles each day you workout or working on every muscle each day you work out…

So for example…which would be better: doing legs and shoulders one day, back and bi’s one day, and tri’s and chest one day…

Or doing one or two exercises from each muscle in one day. You would be doing the same exercises each week but i was just wondering which would be better…any help would be great


#2

i dont know the advantages/disadvantages of that, but I do know you should work alternating muscle groups on the same day… like if you do chest do back, if you do bi’s do tri’s… ect…


#3

[quote=“TropicalJoel”]Hey guys I was just wondering your opinion on this…What do you think is better for pitching…working on 2 specific muscles each day you workout or working on every muscle each day you work out…

So for example…which would be better: doing legs and shoulders one day, back and bi’s one day, and tri’s and chest one day…

Or doing one or two exercises from each muscle in one day. You would be doing the same exercises each week but i was just wondering which would be better…any help would be great[/quote]

For the most effective workout, I wouldn’t recommend either of those.

First off when you say one or two exercises from each muscle, I am assuming that you are suggesting isolation. This does little for your athletic performance as you never use “just one muscle” and really it doesn’t improve strength even close to what many exercises can do for you.

The groups split is ok, but I’m not a fan of it really. I don’t think, especially a ballplayer needs to devote a full workout to just chest and tri’s. And working opposite muscles in the same workout is most effective for an athlete.

The group split is really a body building routine. This is because body builders will do many reps of iolsation and specific work as they are interested in physique. Per pound of body weight, a bodybuilder is generally not that strong compared to an athlete.

Personally I would recommend an upper body, lower body split for athletes.

Athletic gains will come mostly from compound movements (squats, deadlifts, pullups, lunges, rows, presses). And these only need to be supplemented by other lifts. If you go hard at these, they only need a few supplemental (generally still compound) lifts to finish off a great workout.


#4

I think it’s a matter of preference, and also what type of exercises you want to do. Some of the compounds work upper and lower in the movement, like a clean and jerk, or a snatch. It is important to also add in some upper dominant moves (presses) and lower dominant (deads and squats), but I think you can incorporate them all into a single workout effectively.

There is also some physiological reasoning behind why I like full body better. Basically, once you have 120 seconds of muscular stress, thats the maximum “stimulus” or impetus to grow that the muscle can take*. Doing more than that is counter productive. So if you extrapolate that to your exercises, assuming each rep is 3-4 seconds of stress, you only need 30-40 reps to get results. If you do a lower body day, most people end up hitting each muscle group twice. It’s not really necessary.

*It was a NASA study, I believe. The scientists were trying to figure out the minimum amount of muscular stress required to prevent astronauts from losing muscle mass when in zero gravity.


#5

[quote=“kc86”]
*It was a NASA study, I believe. The scientists were trying to figure out the minimum amount of muscular stress required to prevent astronauts from losing muscle mass when in zero gravity.[/quote]

That’s pretty interesting, curious if you happened to have a link to the abstract, I need to add that to a running tally of worthwhile studies I’m beginning (so that when I read them and desire to reference them later I can actually find them, lol)

And as KC said, with personal preference I think full body workouts can be great too. With those you just need compound lifts and your good to go.


#6

I dug through some old magazines to find the article. It was in the May 2006 issue of Men’s Health, but it didnt give any direct studies, just passing references to the institution that performed the study. The main guy they spoke with was Vincent Caiozzo from University of California, Irvine. Also in there was Jeff Volek from UConn.

The main stuff in the article is that you build muscle for 48 hours postworkout. That fits well with the 3 day a week fullbody schedule