Tubing


#1

Where can I buy a tubing that will stretch the legs?

Any kind of arm bands do you recommend for pitchers to buy?


#2

By arm bands, do you mean tubing to work the arms?

I like the kind that have a D grip and can be used in combination with each other to create a wide range of resistances.


#3

CoachPaul,

Yes, Tubing that works the arms. I was wondering which ones are really good.


#4

I got mine on amazon. Sets with multiple resistances, D-grips, door anchors, and easy change-out or addition of tubes are the best. Just don’t over exert on the tubes. Understand that the tube resistance is greatest when it’s stretched out. That’s also when the arm is its most vulnerable to injury.


#5

CoachPaul,

What kind did you get? I will need a kind that I can use inside a gym as well when I get outside.


#6

I’m not sure we can promote product on the forum, but I can say the set was about 35.00 on amazon.


#7

Here’s my .02

http://baseballthinktank.com/injury-prevention-surgical-tubing-or-weighted-balls/


#8
  1. It only allows our arms to move in a linear direction (straight line) and the throwing patterns are everything but linear. The shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in the body and the patterns forced by the tubing limit and restrict the shoulders movements.

The patterns aren’t as important as the blood flow. After all, we warm up to throw. The motions of the warm up need not mimic pitching. These are not drills they are exercises.

  1. The stress placed on the arm from tubing is greatest when arm is at its weakest. The further your arm gets away from the mid-line of your body, the greater the risk for injury. As the arm moves away from the fence into its most vulnerable position, the tensile strength of the tubing is at its greatest.

Agreed. That’s why the tension not be excessive. We aren’t power lifting, we are warming and increasing blood flow.

  1. The tubing is a pain in the neck to attach and it requires the assistance of a fence and cannot be performed in every park or home setting.

If you get the right kind, it secures to anything.

  1. Tubing is expensive and takes a beating based on the weather and climate in different regions of the country.

It should not be left hanging exposed to the elements. I’m sure no one would advocate leaving weighted balls laying around.

  1. It’s dangerous because it can snap at anytime, I have seen tubing break on multiple occasions and leave whelps and bruises.

There is danger from using balls that are too heavy as well. Any training aid should be inspected before use and respected during use.

  1. There is too much grey area in the movement patterns and exercises. If not performed properly, the player is not receiving the benefits. The tubing’s strength changes based on the distance and positioning of the arm and body in relationship to the starting point (fence). By using a weighted ball, the stress remains constant and requires the arm to move more efficiently.

Anything not used properly decreases the benefit. There are 6-8 very good tubing exercises that work each rotator cuff muscle as well as the major surrounding groups. These exercises are not about high stress. After all, we are talking about a little 5 oz ball, we need not be pumped up like Hans and Franz.


#9

Coach Paul,

No question, like anything else it comes down to your intent. The same principal applies here. If its all about blood flow and warming up, the same exercises could be performed using the glove w/o buying tubing.


#10

You are 100% correct. I just see tubing as a great way to warm up targeted muscles more quickly and thoroughly than just holding a weight in the hand like a glove or a weighted ball, and I don’t see the things you listed as negatives to be prohibitively significant .

Tubing offers light resistance in both directions and I can feel the muscles heating up faster than anything else I’ve tried.

I’m not saying there is not benefit to the use of weighted balls. I certainly see the overload and underload potential. I just think that scrapping the use of tubing is not warranted.


#11

I am just looking for some good tubes to buy the boys so they can do some band work before they even throw a baseball before games or practices.


#12

SPRI is fine. Alan Jaeger’s bands are the best quality IMO.

CoachPaul it’s fine to promote products you like using, it only helps everyone else out.

We sell our own sets as well (value line, 5 bands and 4 cuffs for $39) on our site, but anything really works as long as it is used properly.


#13

Kyleb,

which ones would you recommend for 13 yr olds and 14 yr olds?

CoachPaul, which one did you buy?


#14

I answered in the crossover symmetry thread.