Torso seperation

I recently changed my mechanics to get more torso hip seperation. However when I throw on a mound and try to get that seperation, I realized that I have basically no stride. It feels natural, but could this just be because I am not yet comfortable with my delivery yet to take a longer stride, or is there any possible problems I could be having?

For stride length think like Freddy Garica. Also my torso hip seperation is (not to brag) Lincecum-Esque.

I guess another question is more torso hip seperation likely the cause of me having better control, because I’ve noticed I have alot better inside outside control, I however still have some problems high-low.

are you wanting to lengthen your stride or stay where you’re at. linc has an extremely long stride, much farther than his height.

What did you do to get more separation?

Depends what you did to get more separation.

What did you do to get more separation?

Depends what you did to get more separation.[/quote]

To get more seperation I tried to open my hips up earlier, I realized in watching tape of myself that my hips were closed at footstrike, i tried to get them so they were open at foot strike.

What did you do to get more separation?

Depends what you did to get more separation.[/quote]

To get more seperation I tried to open my hips up earlier, I realized in watching tape of myself that my hips were closed at footstrike, i tried to get them so they were open at foot strike.[/quote]

It’s a lot easier to get hip shoulder seperation when one shortens his stride. This is basically what you have done. The better control is probably a result of it as well. It probably helped correct a timing issue that you where unaware off. This is how I teach younger kids to get better control. I shorten their stride some, which comes at a cost of a liitle loss in velocity. However, as one becomes accustomed to throwing with better balance and control, one slowly starts to naturally extend his stride while continuing to maintain balance and control, resulting in more explosive throws. Continue what you are doing, while working on progressively extending your stride, but don’t be in a hurry. You can’t learn to get better hip shoulder seperation overnight without sacrificing something.

The lack of control with the highs and lows indicates you may have a problem with the shifting of the weight mechanics. Some videos could confirm this. It sound like you may be letting your upper torso weight fall forward while striding. When you stride, you want to make sure you are keeping your head and shoulders over your waist until foot strike. Then as you begin to open up your shoulders, shift your weight forward as you throw your chest forward over your GS knee.

Thanks for the input, I think I actually have more velocity because I am throwing with more than just my arm now. I used to be more low 70s now I think I’m more mid 70’s. I am hoping after more core exercises I could get even more velocity

Instead of opening the hips earlier, I would strive to rotate the shoulders later. That means you’ll have to fix anything that’s causing early shoulder rotation.

I will try to get a video of my mechanics as soon as possible, but in the mean time if you see cliff lee at foot strike thats about what I am at.

Heres a picture from O’Leary’s website:

What could be a cause of my shoulders rotating too soon and how could I fix that?

Balance and posture issues, glove-side instability, etc.

[quote=“Priceless”]What could be a cause of my shoulders rotating too soon and how could I fix that?[/quote]Many times, it’s a result of excessively early hip rotation. By that I mean back near the rubber, as soon as the first forward movement starts. This, combined with mental imagery in the kid of throwing with the arm, “throwing darts”. Pointing the glove at the target and pulling it back. Sweeping the glove with a straight arm around and back. The lack of a mental image that includes moving sideways toward the plate and throwing late.

Many things and combos of them. In younger kids, I find that I can get improvement by drawing a line in the dirt from their back foot toward the target and asking the kid to move sideways along that line as long as he can before he finally rotates his shoulders to throw, reaching a good flat back finish. It eliminates a lot of mechanics fog in his mind and gets him throwing with the body more. Last summer, I used it with some 16 and 17 year olds and saw improvement there as well.