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[quote=“coolhand3030”]

I came across this website and wanted to post a video.[/quote]

Looks good.

you have a short stride

very short stride
another thing i don’t like is how his foot lands but then strides more. its not a mechanical problem just i don’t like it. :evil:

you’re throwing across your body which will affect your consistency and put more strain on your elbow

[quote=“futureKazmir”]very short stride
another thing i don’t like is how his foot lands but then strides more. its not a mechanical problem just i don’t like it. :evil:[/quote]

agreed it looks weird, and I actually think if you didnt do that, you would stride longer which in turn would allow you to add 2-3 mph.

rob nen?

First of all, no he doesn’t. He’s striding probably 80 to 90 percent of his height, which is normal.

Second, he’s going from the slide step, so his stride is going to be shorter.

Third, there’s nothing necessarily wrong with a short stride. It helps you release the ball higher.

He strides a little closed, but not very much.

This is not a big deal.

He’s wearing running shoes on Astroturf. Astroturf can get slick, expecially on a downhill.

That’s why his foot slides forward after plant.

It might be a good idea to wear nubby cleats when throwing in a situation like this. Otherwise you could end up hyperextending your knee.

This wouldn’t happen if he was wearing cleats and pitching from a real mound.

First of all, no he doesn’t. He’s striding probably 80 to 90 percent of his height, which is normal.

Second, he’s going from the slide step, so his stride is going to be shorter.

Third, there’s nothing necessarily wrong with a short stride. It helps you release the ball higher.[/quote]

Yes it is a short stride for someone that is 6’2. And there are things that are wrong with short strides -

short strides are the cause of three problems: lack of velocity, poor control and more stress on the arm or the low back.

a short stride causes the pitcher’s front leg to begin straightening or extending far too early while the pitcher is rotating both his hips and his trunk into the ball release position. This early extension of the front leg causes a jarring action of the body and for the pitcher it’s like throwing at a moving target. This early straightening of the front leg also can pull the back leg away from the ground much too early so the pitcher is now trying to hit a target while losing the stability of being on two legs as his body is rotating at high speed.

The same jarring action from the front leg straightening that reduces control also adds additional stress to the low back and the arm…and to the front knee and hip.

As a side note -

Steve Ellis has an article on this site i believe talking about the whole stride thing.

Different takes on it from different people.

All i know is that i have the same stride length as some 6’4 pitchers which is what allows me to throw 90 mph

Flying open into landing

If you can stay closed you should gain a couple mph.

[quote=“RIstar”]Flying open into landing

If you can stay closed you should gain a couple mph.[/quote]

he’s not flying open at all

If you pause the video you will see that he doesn not keep the shoulders back long enough. He does fly open it is very easy to see if you can slow the video down.

Also the flying open is on the 1st couple ones.

lanky lefty go on AIM

[quote=“LankyLefty”][quote=“RIstar”]Flying open into landing

If you can stay closed you should gain a couple mph.[/quote]

he’s not flying open at all[/quote]

I agree.

He’s pretty much perfect in this respect.

His hip/shoulder separation is great.

I dunno if it’s been said already but you throw across your body as well.

You have really good arm speed. Even though you’re only pitching like 80%, you can tell from the video that you’ve got a really quick arm. just keep your weight back more before you explode. And if you put on some weight and straighten up your stride, I bet you’ll be low to mid 90s

Striding to the throwing arm side often results in a late posture change as the upper half attempts to get back in line with and square up to the target. The posture change is usually a bend at the waist to the glove side and that usually results in falling off to the side. Starting on the left side of the rubber is one way to address this. You already do this though I’d be curious if you start on the left side of the rubber back in high school.

Appears to start on the extreme left side of the rubber, I would be interested to see same video with him middle to right side of the rubber and see what that does to his stride…also from windup. Just a personal preference, I don’t like rhp only from left side (sinkerball specialist aside). But a very athletic move with an apparent quick arm … I likey.