57%


#1

Just read the book The Arm by Jeff Passan. Factual and informative, though Passan does not come right out and tell us what he thinks is the cause of the epidemic of UCL tears in baseball. He does confirm a fact that Dr. James Andrews has written and talked about at length, and it is this: In the 1990s, of all Tommy John surgeries performed, 0% were performed on teenagers; today, 57% of all Tommy John surgeries are performed on teenagers. That is a shocking increase. What changed in youth baseball from the 1990s to today? We all know, don’t we?


#2

lol yeah definitely


#3

South_paw,

“Just read the book The Arm by Jeff Passan.”

Hope he does another book where the answer and mitigation to the problem is spread through out the baseball community, rather than be avoided because of marketing systems as it is now.

“Factual and informative”

He did not have the complete information to form an actually factual report, he does now!

“Passan does not come right out and tell us what he thinks is the cause of the epidemic of UCL tears in baseball.”

This is because he has been told in person and now knows why the MCL(UCL) degrades in the elbow !!!

The answer is not “pitch counts” or inning year long oppertunities.

I would say that 98% of all the pitching coaches out there are still voluntarily ignorant about why this pathomechanic is prevalent!

If your Humerus is late in arriving (glove side foot plant benchmark) along with the incorrect forearm rotational (pronated at the back) arrival, you will then hard backwards bounce the forearm during the rotational acceleration phase that micro tears the UCL with every rep.

This is so easy to fix, it’s like insanity to the 6th power.

Humeral/forearm arrival (at simultaneous glove side foot plant, benchmark) after their transition to length should have the Humerus 80% outwardly rotated and the forearm close to fully supinated at the back to start the rotational acceleration phase, no UCL involved.