Too much?

My catchers always yell at me for doing so much benchpress. I was doing it everyday, but now I do it almost every other day. They say it puts too much pressure on the shoulder, having all the pec muscle. I havent felt musclebound or anything at all. Im 6’0 205 lbs and I max out at 200. I know pitchers arent supposed to bench (I think), but I plan on playing football next year. Plus its kinda what gets talked about when you compare strength. I love it.
Do you guys think my frame handles it well enough? Or should I stop?

It’s a hot button issue, but I havent seen any evidence beyond empirical (ie. personal experience).

Me personally, I think benching is highly overrated as a marker of overall strength. There are quite a few guys that can bench more than I can, but very few that can actually overpower me (I train grappling/ mma, so it is a bit more obvious than for a pitcher). That being said, benching can be used as part of your program. Every other day seems like overkill- try to back it off to once a week with the barbell + once a week with DB’s (or pushup variations).

If you want to work on your weight room numbers, focus on deadlifts, squats, and high pulls. Increasing your strength in those lifts will provide huge dividends on the football and baseball fields. I’d also add some dynamic upper and lower body work (plyos, med ball, etc.).

Remember, you want to be a well rounded athlete, not a powerlifter. Lifting is a means to that end, not the end in itself. Plan your program accordingly.

I’d take kc’s advice there. I’d also like to add that alignment of the humerus (upper arm bone) in the shoulder socket is a key component in reducing injury risk. Toward that end, balanced strength around the joint, any joint, is essential. You need to be very careful that you aren’t favoring the pecs over the other surrounding musculature. Strength in the front and weakness in the back can cause mis-alignment of the humerus in the socket, potentially resulting in impingement issues or unbalanced stresses in that joint. Balance.

Yup, I agree with dm59 here. If you’re going heavy and frequently with the “push” movement of bench, you need to balance it out with a “pull” movement, such as rows and scapula stabilizations exercises. See this article for more about this topic:

http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/articles/workout_mistakes.htm

I bench as part of my normal workout routine, I don’t think theres anything wrong with benching as a pitcher, but like Steve said you need to balance every push out with a pull (Literally, rule of thumb is a set of rows that work the lats and traps for every set of bench you do) People say that if you get musclular you’ll get to tight. Most people don’t realise how muscular you need to get to become muscle bound, and almost nobody gets to that point. A good fullbody Chest/Arms/Back/Shoulders/Abs/Legs workout isn’t going to hurt any pitcher, it’ll make you throw harder and with more stamina. Just make sure to stretch!

[quote=“kc86”]It’s a hot button issue, but I havent seen any evidence beyond empirical (ie. personal experience).

Me personally, I think benching is highly overrated as a marker of overall strength. There are quite a few guys that can bench more than I can, but very few that can actually overpower me (I train grappling/ mma, so it is a bit more obvious than for a pitcher). That being said, benching can be used as part of your program. Every other day seems like overkill- try to back it off to once a week with the barbell + once a week with DB’s (or pushup variations).

If you want to work on your weight room numbers, focus on deadlifts, squats, and high pulls. Increasing your strength in those lifts will provide huge dividends on the football and baseball fields. I’d also add some dynamic upper and lower body work (plyos, med ball, etc.).

Remember, you want to be a well rounded athlete, not a powerlifter. Lifting is a means to that end, not the end in itself. Plan your program accordingly.[/quote]

Thanks for the advice. I do deadlifts, and Im gonna start doing squats (bad knees, cant help but let my heels come up). I also do power cleans and our gauntlet, which are pretty good for doing all your muscles. But I think Im going to fall back to benching once a week, because at my max of 200 Im the strongest in the program (for that excersize), and being a sophomore it makes me feel kind of wierd.
We have a pretty small weightroom so I cant really do medicine balls and such.
Also thanks to Ellis and DM for the push pull note. I had forgotten about rows, which I can do at home.
Our weightroom is pretty limited. We have benches, squat racks, deadlift cages, dumbells, a dip machine, a curl bar, and a thing for your forearms, plus dot drillls.
I think my core lift workout will be:

Monday: Deadlift, Tuesday: Bench Press, Wednesday: Power Cleans, Thursday: Either more deadlifts or squats.
Does that sound ok? On Mondays I’ll add rows, and Ill be doing other excersizes as well.

I’ve also heard that while benching, when bringing the weights down to your chest, you should make a 90 degree angle with your elbows at the most instead of going with the full range of motion (elbows down past the bench) because that really puts a great deal of stress on the rotator cuff. Again, this is just something i’ve heard a couple of times and i’ll let the experts on this (steven, kc, dm, etc.) verify this myth.

[quote=“Jacobs 21”][quote=“kc86”]It’s a hot button issue, but I havent seen any evidence beyond empirical (ie. personal experience).

Me personally, I think benching is highly overrated as a marker of overall strength. There are quite a few guys that can bench more than I can, but very few that can actually overpower me (I train grappling/ mma, so it is a bit more obvious than for a pitcher). That being said, benching can be used as part of your program. Every other day seems like overkill- try to back it off to once a week with the barbell + once a week with DB’s (or pushup variations).

If you want to work on your weight room numbers, focus on deadlifts, squats, and high pulls. Increasing your strength in those lifts will provide huge dividends on the football and baseball fields. I’d also add some dynamic upper and lower body work (plyos, med ball, etc.).

Remember, you want to be a well rounded athlete, not a powerlifter. Lifting is a means to that end, not the end in itself. Plan your program accordingly.[/quote]

Thanks for the advice. I do deadlifts, and Im gonna start doing squats (bad knees, cant help but let my heels come up). I also do power cleans and our gauntlet, which are pretty good for doing all your muscles. But I think Im going to fall back to benching once a week, because at my max of 200 Im the strongest in the program (for that excersize), and being a sophomore it makes me feel kind of wierd.
We have a pretty small weightroom so I cant really do medicine balls and such.
Also thanks to Ellis and DM for the push pull note. I had forgotten about rows, which I can do at home.
Our weightroom is pretty limited. We have benches, squat racks, deadlift cages, dumbells, a dip machine, a curl bar, and a thing for your forearms, plus dot drillls.
I think my core lift workout will be:

Monday: Deadlift, Tuesday: Bench Press, Wednesday: Power Cleans, Thursday: Either more deadlifts or squats.
Does that sound ok? On Mondays I’ll add rows, and Ill be doing other excersizes as well.[/quote]

I would suggest adding some explosive lower body work into there as well, because while your building strength with that program, its going to be useless if all the muscle your building is of the slow twitch variety.

AND DON’T FORGET CORE WORK!!! Get yourself on a really excellent core program, and make yourself throw up from pain every time you do it.(Exaggeration, but work intensely)

Mine, done on days 2 and 4 of my 4 day workout program, 5 being rest, and 1 and 3 being HIT cardio.

3x15 Crunches on medicine ball w/40 pound plate
3x15 lying leg raises w/10 pound dumbell
3x15 side plank raises w/10 pound plate (3 on each side)
3x15 bycicle maneuver
3x15 V-ups
Planks to failure

One thing you have to keep in mind is that your training to throw a 5 oz. ball, not a 300 lb. lineman (unless you’re more serious about football).

Haha Nicely said.

But would you say a 6’3" 210 pound body like Roy Williams of the Dallas Cowboys is bad for a pitcher. Some of the inheritly leaner positions in football are great examples of what a pitcher can hope to acheive in my oppinion, strong upperbody, great core strength and explosive lower body

I agree with most of you guys in saying you need a pull for every push. But I will say benching will not help you in your pitching. Core strength and momentum.