Too much speed?


#1

im going to be a freshmen this next year…i have seen that an average sophmore throws upper 70s lower 80s…but i already throw between 80 and 85…should i hold up on velocity or just keep throwing like that???


#2

Why hold up? if you can throw that fast already it’s a good thing as long as you can control it and it doesn’t easily wear down your arm.


#3

my arm doesnt wear down i can usually throw around 100 pitches a game at that speed…if needed…yea i can control it…my strike to ball ratio is about 4 to 1


#4

I have no idea why u would hold up. If anything you should try to get faster. It doesn’t matter if you throw 90 that is no reason to let up at all. Why are you worried about throing harder anyways?


#5

Hold Up? Are you crazy. I was always told you cant teach speed. Thats like telling a football player who is quicker and more agile than the rest that maybe he should slow himself down rather than use his speed.

Keep working on your velocity because alot can happen for you if you throw hard, thats just the nature of the beast.


#6

I would hold up.

Once he reached the majors, Greg Maddux rarely threw at full speed (low 90s). Instead, he threw in the high 80s. Holding up places less stress on your arm. Sandy Koufax also had to hold up to improve his control.

This also gives you the advantage of being able to reach back and really up the velocity on your FB once or twice in a game.


#7

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]I would hold up.

Once he reached the majors, Greg Maddux rarely threw at full speed (low 90s). Instead, he threw in the high 80s. Holding up places less stress on your arm. Sandy Koufax also had to hold up to improve his control.[/quote]Obviously, those guys made adjustments because they had to. There was a reason. We don’t know enough about this pitcher to draw any conclusions. If his control is good, that’s out as a reason. If he’s having shoulder or elbow pain, that’s a reason to consider holding up but I’d look at his mechanics first. We haven’t seen this guy pitch. He might be all arm. If so, let’s fix that.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]This also gives you the advantage of being able to reach back and really up the velocity on your FB once or twice in a game.[/quote]The danger here is that he’ll “air it out” that once or twice in a game but, not having trained for it, he won’t be “fit” to do it and will increase his risk of injury.


#8

…If he’s having shoulder or elbow pain, that’s a reason to consider holding up but I’d look at his mechanics first. We haven’t seen this guy pitch. He might be all arm. If so, let’s fix that…

To that i just want to say that i havent had any shoulder or elbow problems…and i believe my mechanics are alright…so i dont know…but i appreciate the comments


#9

well…if u havn’t had any elbow pains or arm pains, then u shouldn’t have a problem and u might want to hold up maybe a couple pitches every inning to take some relief to your arm even if your not feeling any pains…but if your only gonna be a freshman and you throw between 80-85 then i would use that to your advantage.


#10

I think far fewer pitchers would be injured if they (and their parents and coaches) followed the lead of Trevor Hoffman’s father and took a proactive approach to pitching rather than a reactive approach; if they threw only as hard as they needed to rather than as hard as they could.

I’m taking this approach with my 11 YO son.

He has some mechanical problems that are costing him MPH (in particular hips not rotating far enough ahead of his shoulders) that I have deliberately chosen not to address because he doesn’t need the speed.

Instead, we spend our time focusing on location and control (e.g. keeping the ball down), and that works just fine.

Against average hitters, he strikes them out. Against good hitters, he either strikes them out or gives up ground balls that are fielded by the infield.


#11

He of course has to condition his arm so that it can handle the maximum load that he places on it.

However, if he does that then by holding back most of the time he’ll end up with the ability to both slow down from and speed up from his standard fastball. He’ll end up with a change-up, a fastball, and an “11” fastball (the last pitch being an homage to that great baseball movie “This is Spinal Tap”).

That will wreak havoc on the timing of the batters he faces.


#12

He may not need the speed but unless he is intentionally slowing down his arm (which is a whole different problem), he is putting more stress on his arm than is necessary. With improved separation, he will recruit more of his core strength to throw with and place less stress on his arm. Besides, the sooner you fix the mechanical problem, the easier it will be to fix.


#13

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]He of course has to condition his arm so that it can handle the maximum load that he places on it.[/quote]How’s he going to do that if he doesn’t practice it? How do you really know that his mechanics won’t change when he attempts to air it out if he doesn’t practice that? Don’t slow the kid down for no reason at all. We don’t have a clue what this kid is doing. He might have the smoothest, most flawless mechanics you’ve ever seen OR he might be doing something that will result in surgery. We just don’t know. All of this talk is absolutely USELESS, not having even seen the pitcher. Speculation, at best.

Actually, I’m wasting my own time just writing this. :roll:


#14

He of course has to condition his arm so that it can handle the maximum load that he places on it.

However, if he does that then by holding back most of the time he’ll end up with the ability to both slow down from and speed up from his standard fastball. He’ll end up with a change-up, a fastball, and an “11” fastball (the last pitch being an homage to that great baseball movie “This is Spinal Tap”).

That will wreak havoc on the timing of the batters he faces.[/quote]
Won’t he be wreaking havoc on his own timing? By “holding back”, it sounds like you’re saying he would use different amounts of separation to produce different velocities? That means using different mechanics and timing. And that will probably make him more inconsistent as well as possibly tip off batters.