Too Buff

You know yall say, you don’t wanna be too buff or stocky as a pitcher or you’ll loose flexibility and can cause injury?
If that happens, what can you do? Can you do anything to gain flexibility again?
Just out of curiosity

Another one of those old geezer’s tales.
How a pitcher is built has little or nothing to do with flexibility, velocity, or even whether he takes the subway or drives. What does have to do with it is what sort of shape the pitcher is in. If you’re in good shape, well conditioned, have your stuff working for you, it doesn’t matter whether you’re constructed like C.C. Sabathia or Randy Johnson.
Many moons ago the Yankees had two pitchers who were similarly built: Ed Lopat, 5’10" and 180 to 185 pounds, and Whitey Ford, 5’10" and 180 to 185 pounds. Lopat was a pitcher who didn’t have a fast ball to speak of; Ford was only slightly faster. Both of them were winning pitchers and then some. Nowadays we see a lot of skinnybones of extreme height in the majors as well as the Sabathias and the Chamberlains—so what? As long as they stay in shape, they won’t get hurt. :slight_smile:

It’s not that you don’t want to be too buff … TONS of pitchers are “buff.” But the point is that you want to be balanced - front/back, upper/lower - so that you’re able to maintain flexibility. Big is generally good in pitching. Just make sure it’s the right kind of big :slight_smile:

Yep, and I doubt too many people in here are close to being too big.

Just as an example, here is a pic of former Mr Olympia Ronnie Coleman.

Would the sheer size of his musculature prevent him from being a good pitcher? Sure. But it wouldnt be from lack of flexibility.

That dude is almost as buff as Kyle Farnsworth when he was in his prime on the Cubbies :lol: :lol: :lol:
Can we explain that??? Kyle was a 100mph flame throwing buffed out guy…right Steven? He did get better as he lost muscle mass but I don’t remember how hard he was throwing in his last couple of teams.

It’s not about being buff…It’s about being good-looking, am I right? :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

[quote=“jdfromfla”]That dude is almost as buff as Kyle Farnsworth when he was in his prime on the Cubbies :lol: :lol: :lol:
Can we explain that??? Kyle was a 100mph flame throwing buffed out guy…right Steven? He did get better as he lost muscle mass but I don’t remember how hard he was throwing in his last couple of teams.[/quote]

Can someone say steroids?

[quote=“Hammer”][quote=“jdfromfla”]That dude is almost as buff as Kyle Farnsworth when he was in his prime on the Cubbies :lol: :lol: :lol:
Can we explain that??? Kyle was a 100mph flame throwing buffed out guy…right Steven? He did get better as he lost muscle mass but I don’t remember how hard he was throwing in his last couple of teams.[/quote]

Can someone say steroids?[/quote]

Yeahh budday. Yeahhh budday. Nothing but a peanut.

I would agree with most of what’s been said so far. The key for me is balance. When I train for spring training, I focus most on lower body and core strength. The more squats and dead lifts the better. As for upper body, I think you def. do bench press, but within reason. Pullups and rows are great as well.

If you get “too buff” to best thing to do is lower your weight and up your reps. Spend some time doing band work and “quick twitch” muscle exercises (e.g. clap push ups) Spend some more time stretching and doing yoga like exercises.

Of course, there are many shapes for a good pitcher to take…Know your own body and feel how it responds to your workouts